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Foundation paper left stiff in washed quilt

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HELP!! I just finished quilting a quilt for a customer and used foundation paper that was ok to leave in. I've washed it 3x leaving the triangles wrinkly, stiff & sounding like paper still underneath. Does anybody have any suggestions. There is no softness in the quilt either.

Thanks for any advice


Anne Marcellis :rolleyes: 

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I can't remember what brank I used but about 5 years ago I used a similar supposedly washout paper and it first went spongy or mushy when wet and then once dried it was crunchy like that. I washed it several times and it didnt get any better. It was a gift but I never thought to ask if it evenutally came out or not. My idea is once it is sandwiched in there even when it gets wet it cant very easily be washed away. Bummer!!

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I actually did that on my first applique quilt and the paper wasn't disolvable, I ended up picking open the appliques in small spots and using tweezers, removing the papers so my quilt wasn't "crunchy"....


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So glad you posted this! I'm working on a paper peiced project and was thinking about leaving the foundations in. Seems like a PITA to remove them. I'm thinking I may take them out before I quilt this. Has anyone found a foundation material that isn't to expensive, is transparent, and can be left in a quilt? This is my first paper peiced project.


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Ask the customer to look at the instructions on the so-called disolvable paper. They are usually very specific about water temperature (sometimes they need very hot water and plenty of rinsing to go away) and also length of time in the water. I think if it is already quilted upon and enclosed with batting, it is much more difficult to remove. The pieced top perhaps should have been soaked and all paper removed when it was a flimsy--before it was given to be quilted. A stay-stitch on the perimeter would have been enough to keep everything in line for quilting. What a shame to have to endure a crunchy, noisy quilt!

Hi Kay---please take the time to remove whatever paper you use. There are various products available for easy paper piecing and most recommend removal of the paper. You can piece the entire quilt first and then sit and remove the paper later. This allows for ease of aligning seams and keeping any bias edges from stretching before you get it stitched into a full top. Easiest way I have found to remove the paper is to lay the seams across a tailor's ham, use the blunt end of a seam ripper or other implement, and press along the seam. The paper pops off the seam easily with little stuck in the stitching--and soon you are surrounded by confetti!

For string-pieced blocks, Bonnie Hunter recommends the half-sized business phone books. She cuts the paper to size and says the ink never transfers to the fabric. She soaks them after piecing and the paper makes a gooey mess in the bucket but comes off easily without having to pick it off. Strain the pulp out with a screen and put in the trash/recycle bin.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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lightweight non-iron vilene makes a good foundation and can be left in , gives a slightly firmer feel but at least it doesn't crunch.


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Blue Rose Quilting

'07 Milly hand-guided

APQS rep West Australia

Quilts made with love don't have Made in China on the label...

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Were these quilts washed in a newer front loading high efficiency washing machine? They use less water. I wonder if the paper was designed for the older top loading machines that use more water and really soak the clothes.

Dianne

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Yes, I finally realized my high efficiency washing machine was the problem. I then soaked the quilt in the bath tub, air dried it & had the same results. I made the quilt as well as quilted it quite heavily. I used the foundation paper method for the entire quilt because I used Electric Quilt and found I needed to cut measurements like 2 3/16". Some of the foundation paper was tear away, which I did tear out. Some was wash away, which was impossible to tear. Some was "leave in". I don't know which of the last 2 were the problem. I finally gave the quilt to my customer. She didn't think it was a problem & loves it. -maybe because she doesn't know anything about quilts??? I don't know, but I'm relieved she's very pleased with it.

Don't you hate to learn from your mistakes? Note to self: ALWAYS USE TEAR AWAY PAPER!!!! :D


Anne Marcellis :rolleyes: 

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Guest Linda S

I actually love to sit and tear the paper out of foundation piecing. I find it a very relaxing thing to do. Sorry you had a problem with your quilt.

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I use regular copy paper from my printer. It tears away easily. Vellum works great too...but is more expensive.


Kristina at website http://withakquilting.blogspot.com/ and personal blog http://froggybottomquilting.blogspot.com/

 

Hoppily quilting along with FROGGER - my Green Millennium, and TOAD - my Liberty. Quiltazoid equipped too!

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I am making some foundation blocks and bought a pad of tracing paper tore them all out of the book, and printed on them. It is more see through to see the lines and tears off easy.


3903CF121430B009ACE771072A3FAF28.pngLenni 2009

on IQ carriage with edgerider wheels and 2012 Lucey on bliss

www.j-quilts.co.uk

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I use Carol Doak's foundation paper. The paper doesn't shrink when you use steam with your iron. Plus the paper tears off very easily, as long as you shorten your stitch length.


Sharon Dimberg

APQS Dealer, Quilt Design, Piecing, Long Arm Quilting

quirkyquilting@comcast.net

Quirky Quilting by Sharon

APQS Millennium

Sew Batik Associate #1049

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I use light weight vellum because it holds-up and is transparent. Costs more then copy paper but less than foundation paper. I don't mind tearing off the pieces, because it allows me to do some beautiful piecing. I'm not very trustworthy when an items says "leave in", there's just to many variables in our quilty world.:o


Connie
Port Huron, MI   48060
APQS Sales Rep and Educator
Millennium with Intelliquilter (IQ)

"Be a good listener, your ears will never get you in trouble" Frank Tygr


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I've tried several "Papers" and have settled on one made by Pellon. It is their Easy Pattern non-woven tracing material. 90%viscose and 10% polyester. It is machine washable and dryable (on a delicate cycle with low heat. I am going to leave this soft material in the quilt top. It is sold by the yard and I'm having to cut 81/2" x 11" sheets to fit in my printer. I do like that the material is somewhat transparent and so easy to line up the fabrics for peicing. I got this at my local Jo-Ann's in San Antonio, TX. it is 45" wide. I'm able to cut 4 sheets from each 8 1/2" strip so I'm getting a lower per sheet cost than the precut sheets I had seen in the stores. The price per yard is $2.49 but I used a 50% off coupon on this so the final price per yard was $1.25. I'm able to cut 16 sheets per yard so the per sheet cost is down to about 8 cents per sheet. Much better than the last stuff I got that cost me a $1.00 per sheet. I had rather cut my own sheets than pay that much for each one.

I would like to hear how the rest of you have managed this expense. And I'll let you know how my project turns out.


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Use regular paper or even ends of newsprint paper from you local newspaper. Just shorten you stitch length, If your paper is falling apart when stitching your stitch length is too short if it is hard to get off you stitch length is too long. Once you find the correct stitch length you shouldn't have a problem. I use "that purple thing" to get off stubborn pieces, usually only a few. Oh and use a topstitch needle that is new that helps also.

Shirley

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I bought a quilt and it has a freezer paper in it that is stitched as applique and piecing...I have tried washing and soaking, and really am tired of picking it out. I plan to quilt it if I ever get the paper out and not until then.


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APQS Representative for Federal Way, WA

klwheeler@yahoo.com

510-386-4156

www.feathersandloops.com

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I've commented before on using newspaper print paper which a person can buy end rolls for very little from a printer. Recently they had a roll of 17# vellum which I purchased (the heavier weight - think it's 30# weight - is too stiff and hard to tear off). I'm using it for a myriad of things including card making and paper piecing. It works very well and, like shirleyl says, stitches can be adjusted (depending on how much bias in the fabric piece) to help facilitate removal, and it holds up better than the newsprint, especially if your block has numerous pieces to stitch in place.


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2009 Freedom, and a 1989 Ulti I w/Intellistitch

 

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I just print my foundations on cheap 20# printer paper from Costco. I use a shorter stitch length and fold and finger press each seam, then very easily tear it off. I completed Sue Garman's 86" x 86" "Stars for a New Day", which is almost entirely paper pieced using this method. Many of the pieces were less than an inch square and there was NO problem with removing the paper.


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