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Battynurse

Frustrated

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So it seems lately that I've spent more time fiddling on my machine than actually sewing on it. I've replaced the leaders and added leader grips (although I'm not sure I did that well at it). I just now finally replaced the speed dial and while it seems to do fine on speeds above 5 it still doesn't move on lower speeds. Amy said this could be because it needs a new motor but since the previous owner stated she had changed the motor when she got it I decided to change the speed dial first. I do understand that this is typical for a 20 year old machine but I'm not really enjoying being a sewing machine repair person. Right now I'm feeling like I would have been just as happy with a sit down machine if not more so but if I switch now I'd need to sell this one and I'm not sure that is even possible. I do know if I had a sit down machine I'd already be quilting as I had already been doing FMQ on my domestic. My reasons for going long arm was that I could do pantographs and that I was thinking I would like to try maybe doing a little business for others. Right now those reasons don't feel good enough. Any input?

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It is a bummer to keep fixing a machine......is there anyway you could have a tech come to your house and fix it?  Is there a dealer close to you that you could check with and see if there is anyone?  Or....have you considered sending the head back in ....I know that is a hassle too....I do like my long arm as I never did get the hang of sitting down free motion and my aging body couldn't handle moving the quilt around anyway....I just had a new problem pop up on mine which stumped me for a bit....but I was able to figure it out and found two gobs of thread and dust removal of which great improved the handling of the machine....we now have a local shop where you can rent time on a machine....and if that had been there before......I may have gone that route and left the techy stuff to someone else....Lin

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Sorry to hear that, maybe you can use some help from Dave Jones. He travels around buying/selling/servicing/moving APQS machines. We also have a showroom in Rancho Cucamonga, they have a technician that will troubleshoot & help you.


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Corey Starkey

IQ & Bllissed Millennium

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BN:

 

There is a study from 1993 that says it takes 10,000 of an activity to become an expert.  Some studies have debunked that theory, but regardless it comes down to practice, practice, practice.  

 

That being said, while you do not enjoy fixing your machine, it does give you a better understanding of it.  Knowing how it works will give you a better understand of why it quilts or does not quilt at particular times.  Like anything new, it is going to take time for you to grow comfortable with your machine.  No different than when you get a new car or some other device.  

 

Why are my darn windows down just a crack, when I came back from shopping?  Because some darn computer geek too bright for me decided if you push the unlock button for more than half a nanosecond, that it would crack them to cool off the inside of the car.  Never mind that the button was pushed when I stuffed me keys in my pocket.  Its a great aid for some, while a total hinderance to others….just have to remember to put keys in pocket outside of 40 feet from car.  It just took me time to learn this little trick.

 

Back to your issues.  APQS can probably tell if or when the seller purchased a motor for your machine.   This will give you a good idea if the motor truly needs replacing.  You can also remove the motor brushes, and blow out the dust inside which might help.  Just be sure to have some rags around to catch the black particles.  Not a white quilt top.  After that, try removing the top thread, and the bobbin from your machine.  Without any quilt top or batting turn on your machine and let it simply run locked in a position for a minute or two at say speed 6.  Then turn it up to the max speed (10 I think)  for minute.  Then work your way down to 9, 8, 7, 6.  Each time for 30 seconds or so.  By the time you get to 5 the motor should be nice and warm.  See if you can then get it to run a slower speeds.  A 20 year old machine has her own quirks and idiosyncrasies, she just may need to be warmed up before she will slow down a find her groove.

 

I saw Jamie Wallen once, and he talked about how he removes the bobbin each day, oils the the area and lets the machine run for 3 minutes at full speed to work in the oil before he quilts each day.  I believe he says the same on his you tube video about caring for you machine.  He said he liked to have the machine warmed up before he started his quilting for the day

 

You have shown some nice quilting jobs since you got your machine.  So it does work well.  You just need to get comfortable with it more.  That will take time.  It may be worth the money to have someone come out to your home that know how to repair the machine, to get you fully setup and comfortable.  The old adage, "Pay me now, or pay me later", probably hold true in this situation.   A little money spent now to help you get your machine fully up and running and more importantly you comfortable with it, will be a lot cheaper than you being frustrated, trying all these non-expert suggestions (me/others), and never figuring it out.  As an instructor in my profession, I believe you are just a little frustrated and need some guidance.  A few good teaching moments, and you will be up an running in no time.  Just hang in there, once you figure out your machine, you will be happy, and look back on this a great learning experience.  

 

Best of luck.

 

Cagey


May your threads be balanced, and your bobbin forever full….

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Thanks everyone. Cagey you are right. It is a matter of practice and when I put something on and it doesn't work like I wanted it to I get frustrated, then don't use it much. Right now it does run, just not at the slower speeds. I need to keep working on it though. So today I'm actually loading one of my finished quilt tops and going to start it, and see if I can get it finished in a manner that I can live with.

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