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AnnP

4 customers and growing

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Im being totally positive that my customers will grow past 4. My website is quiltingforyou.us. I am seriously thinking about rebuilding a new website,and Im talking it up at my quilt guild this weekend.  Just got my Lucey last week, and already she is a awesome quilting machine and she is ready to work. I'm not new at longarming. Thought it would take longer to get used to Lucey, but she is wonderful. Any ideas or tips would be useful. I am quilting quilts for Quilts of Valor, and charity quilts for my guild.

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There are several long armers in our guild so I do not blow my horn there. That being said my best advertising was doing charity quilts for the guild I always add a business card to the quilt when they are returned to the charity group, their is usually 10-14 quilters at their sew days and quilters talk. also the care group shows all the care quilts at our monthly meetings. they always mention who quilted it, this is free advertising for use donating our time. I have had several requests doing this. Hope some of this helps ...word of mouth is my best advertising.


 

Terry

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I have been in business with my Millie for 9 years.  The best thing I did for myself was first join a local Quilt Guild, then join a Friendship Group, and taking classes to meet more potential friends and customers.  I also visited local Quilt Shops showing my work, meeting up with customers at local shops to show completed work. 

It just takes time to build your business, but getting out there and meeting people really worked for me.  Word of mouth is, of course, the best.

BTW, I don't have a website....


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Susan

Suzy Q's Quilting

Millennium

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Ann;

 

I visited your website, and am only providing you constructive criticism.  Please do not take any comments personal, as I am only sharing how I interpret the link when I visited it.  

 

Your site gives the following charges;

 

Crib       $50.00  Lap        $75.00  Twin     $125.00  Full       $ 150.00  Queen  $175.00  I charge 20.00 an hour on top of that. Most quilts are 4-5 hours.

 

When I do an internet search for the different size quilts, I find differing sizes for the listed quilts.  I might suggest you provide specific maximum size measurements for your five listed quilts.  That is to say a Crib/baby quilt is a maximum of 52"x52", a Lap quilt is a maximum of 68"x68", etc.  Here is a link to one of the standard sizes I found, I am sure you can find others that give different sizes.   https://bcquilter.wordpress.com/quilting-information/common-quilt-sizes/

 

As I read your website, I would expect to pay approximately $130 to $150 dollars plus batting for a baby quilt.  

 

Using the $150 price, I calculate you are making $30 per hour (5 x $20=100+50=$150/5=$30).  If it only takes four hours for the crib quilt, you are making $32.50 an hour; (4 x $20=80+50=130/4=$32.5).  If it takes you one hour, you are earning $70 per hour; (1x$20=20+50=$70/1=$70). 

 

I cannot say if your rates for all over meander or stippling is a fair charge in your location.  For my area, I believe the charges are slightly high.  On my second quilt, which I did not actually quilt, I paid $98 for a nice computer edge to edge design.  This included an extra $25 next day charge for the 60 x 72 quilt, and it included them providing the batting.

 

Looking at the five pictures on your webpage, I can only see 3 pictures that clearly show your quilting.  The long middle picture is somewhat out of focus.  You need to have a lot of eye candy to catch visitors attention.  You have to show potential customers what kind of magic you are going to do with their quilts tops.  A customer has to be comfortable that you are going to turn their tops into masterpieces.  They are not going to see their piecing errors, but they will notice any issues you post in the images.  Also, show examples/pictures our custom quilting.  Maybe even give examples with total cost, so customer can better calculate what it is going to have you quilt for them.  

 

I would show some pictures of your studio.  Customers need to feel comfortable that they are visiting a real business.  You could include that your studio is a smoke free, animal free environment, and odor free.  As you probably work out of your home, you probably want to be sure the Korean kimchee you cooked last night does not linger when they arrive the following morning.  

 

I would have links to your Facebook page, showing all your quilting.  Keep your business Facebook separate from your private Facebook.  Jokes and political comments can turn some customers off.  If a comment can be misinterpreted, it will be.  It may be easier to continually update you Facebook page verses your webpage.  Though you may wish to update both rather frequently.  Look at your two links, as you would look at a business.  Emulate/copy the quilting businesses that you like.  You do not need to reinvent the wheel, just make the wheel yours. 

 

Finally, see if your local guild will post your name, phone number, and webpage under the longarm list in their monthly minutes and on their webpage.  My two guilds does that for all the longarm quilters in the group.  There are definitely more piecers then quilters in the guilds, so they are constantly looking for quilters to quilt their tops.   

 

I hope this helps, and I wish you the best of luck with your quilting business.  I think you are well on your way to success.

 

Cagey


May your threads be balanced, and your bobbin forever full….

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Ann;

 

I visited your website, and am only providing you constructive criticism.  Please do not take any comments personal, as I am only sharing how I interpret the link when I visited it.  

 

Your site gives the following charges;

 

Crib       $50.00  Lap        $75.00  Twin     $125.00  Full       $ 150.00  Queen  $175.00  I charge 20.00 an hour on top of that. Most quilts are 4-5 hours.

 

When I do an internet search for the different size quilts, I find differing sizes for the listed quilts.  I might suggest you provide specific maximum size measurements for your five listed quilts.  That is to say a Crib/baby quilt is a maximum of 52"x52", a Lap quilt is a maximum of 68"x68", etc.  Here is a link to one of the standard sizes I found, I am sure you can find others that give different sizes.   https://bcquilter.wordpress.com/quilting-information/common-quilt-sizes/

 

As I read your website, I would expect to pay approximately $130 to $150 dollars plus batting for a baby quilt.  

 

Using the $150 price, I calculate you are making $30 per hour (5 x $20=100+50=$150/5=$30).  If it only takes four hours for the crib quilt, you are making $32.50 an hour; (4 x $20=80+50=130/4=$32.5).  If it takes you one hour, you are earning $70 per hour; (1x$20=20+50=$70/1=$70). 

 

I cannot say if your rates for all over meander or stippling is a fair charge in your location.  For my area, I believe the charges are slightly high.  On my second quilt, which I did not actually quilt, I paid $98 for a nice computer edge to edge design.  This included an extra $25 next day charge for the 60 x 72 quilt, and it included them providing the batting.

 

Looking at the five pictures on your webpage, I can only see 3 pictures that clearly show your quilting.  The long middle picture is somewhat out of focus.  You need to have a lot of eye candy to catch visitors attention.  You have to show potential customers what kind of magic you are going to do with their quilts tops.  A customer has to be comfortable that you are going to turn their tops into masterpieces.  They are not going to see their piecing errors, but they will notice any issues you post in the images.  Also, show examples/pictures our custom quilting.  Maybe even give examples with total cost, so customer can better calculate what it is going to have you quilt for them.  

 

I would show some pictures of your studio.  Customers need to feel comfortable that they are visiting a real business.  You could include that your studio is a smoke free, animal free environment, and odor free.  As you probably work out of your home, you probably want to be sure the Korean kimchee you cooked last night does not linger when they arrive the following morning.  

 

I would have links to your Facebook page, showing all your quilting.  Keep your business Facebook separate from your private Facebook.  Jokes and political comments can turn some customers off.  If a comment can be misinterpreted, it will be.  It may be easier to continually update you Facebook page verses your webpage.  Though you may wish to update both rather frequently.  Look at your two links, as you would look at a business.  Emulate/copy the quilting businesses that you like.  You do not need to reinvent the wheel, just make the wheel yours. 

 

Finally, see if your local guild will post your name, phone number, and webpage under the longarm list in their monthly minutes and on their webpage.  My two guilds does that for all the longarm quilters in the group.  There are definitely more piecers then quilters in the guilds, so they are constantly looking for quilters to quilt their tops.   

 

I hope this helps, and I wish you the best of luck with your quilting business.  I think you are well on your way to success.

 

Cagey

Thank you for all our great info you have given me. I will take your suggestions on the pictures on website, Im already posted on our webpage and newsletter, We only have 1 other longarm quilter for our guild. Im not a greedy person, just want to quilt beautifully for them. Thanks again, Ann

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