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Should I own a longarm quilting machine?

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Hello,

I have been making quilts about 5 years or less, I enjoying quilting my own quilts.  I have a Baby Lock Tiara II sit down quilting machine for 1 year, before that I quilt on my home machine.  Now I'm thinking maybe own a longarm machine but do I really need it since I don't own a quilting business?  Is it worth to invest one?  I'm interested in APQS Lenny or Lucey model.  Do you use your longarm machine for business or personal use?  Thank you in advance for sharing your stories.

 

Christine


 

Christine

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I've owned my Millie since 2005 and I love it. I only quilt for myself and very occasional I will do a quilt for a friend. I do not quilt as a business. I say if you can afford it you want a stand-up quilting machine, go for it. You can't go wrong with an APQS machine. I have a bad back and shoulders so I could never quite get the "hang" of quilting on my DSM. I am also computerized which makes it possible for me to continue to quilt.


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Sue in Phoenix, AZ
Millennium with IntelliQuilter
http://www.flickr.co...aciouscreations

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Hi, I bought a used Lenni off this forum in 2016, and couldn't be happier.  I just quilt for myself and yes my Lenni is worth every penny.  If you have the room and one is in your budget I'd say go for it.   Also, if  I have a question or issue that can't be answered with a search on here, APQS is just a phone call away. I have always been treated at APQS like I just purchased their most expensive new machine,  Anyway that's my two cents.  Sharon

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Christine,

I got my demo Lucey about 7 years ago when I retired......I am glad I did....have I done enough quilts on her to earn my money back?  No.....but have I had fun?  yes!!!  and am I glad I got her?  Yeppers to that also....now I am not a fancy quilter but it is sure nice to be able to finish off my own quilts......so much easier than doing all that basting and pushing under my DSM.....I think it is a good idea if you can to take a lesson or two if you have a local quilt shop that offers that cuz it really helps to help you decide if you really want to do this...some people find that they do not like it and then are more content to "quilt by check"....but I mainly make bedquilts....and it is so cool to just get them done...Lin

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Christine, if you can afford it, go for it. It's so much easier than quilting on a domestic machine. I quilted everything - and that includes big bed quilts - on my DSM for years. It's definitely possible but hard on your shoulders and not as much fun as quilting on a stand up machine. I love my Millie, and I don't ever want to go back to quilting without her. If you are fairly confident about quilting on your DSM, then the transition to a stand up machine should be pretty smooth. It just takes a little practice to get used to moving the machine but in general I find quilting on Millie easier than on my DSM. It's like finally being able to move your pen again while writing instead of the paper!


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I went from quilting on a DSM to a HQ Sweet Sixteen Sitdown machine to a Lenni and now to. a Lucey.  I only quilt for myself and some charity quilts. I love the machine quilting part as much as the piecing. I have no desire to quilt for business.   I loved my Sweet 16 but did not love the basting of the quilt sandwich, so that was the main reason I switched to a longarm. If you can rent time on a longarm to try it and you like it and can afford it, go for it.  


Kathy :)

2017 APQS Lucey

Janome 6600P

 

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I don't own a machine but am planning to purchase one when my house is paid off (a year and a half to go!).  However, I have been renting time on a Millie at a quilting studio.   I would highly suggest that you do this if possible.  There is a difference between demoing and doing your own quilts.   In addition to confirming or validating your decision, you will learn how to load a quilt and do pantos.   Then, when you get your machine, it won't be scary -- you will know just what to do!

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Thank you for all of your responses, I took a longarm quilting lesson a year ago on a Baby Lock machine and got me thinking of a sitdown machine; after using a sitdown machine for 1 year I started to seriously thinking about owning a longarm machine.  The main reason is, like some of you, just not enjoying basting process, especially a big quilt meanwhile move quilt while quilting is a physical demanding job. I have a few bed size or bigger quilt tops been done for years, finally sent 2 of them to a local quilt shop to get the job done so I can use them.  We don't have any APQS dealer nearby; the quilt shops don't use APQS machines so I am excited about going to APQS road show to try it out in early Feb.  Thanks again for all of your input and information, really appreciated.


 

Christine

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I had a George for a few years with the future dream of a frame machine.  A couple years ago I was at the MN Quilt Show in Duluth and ended up with Lucey.  I had always figured that if life changed and I needed to support myself a quilting business would be my choice.  This summer our income was taken away through a business merger so I am starting that quilting business.  I am so glad I already had Lucey and some of the accessories that were nice to have available.  It is all paid for so I don't have to go into debt more to pay bills on the business tools.  Think ahead to your future, what do you want to be able to do?  What do you want to have on hand to make that future more enjoyable?  This worked out well for me since I am no longer driving due to a condition that keeps you safer on the road when I am not. 


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Hello Ladies,

 

I would like to update some news for you - I purchased a Freddie machine! Yes, I did.  I purchased it in Feb. during my visit to APQS' Road Show, received the beginner's lesson in late March and now I have completed two quilts.  I like it, really happy that I no longer need to baste my quilts.  I have the L bobbin, sometimes I am thinking it might be a mistake, should have the M bobbin so I don't need to change bobbins too often, but it is not a big deal.  Do you guys have L or M bobbin? If you have L bobbin, are you happy with it?

 

Cheers and y'all have a great day.


 

Christine

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 HI,

congratulations on your new Freddie......glad you are liking it.......I got a Lucey a few years back and I have an L bobbin....at the time I got mine, the APQS machines were just starting to offer the M bobbin.....I decided to stay with the L bobbin because some folks thought you had fewer tension problems with the L bobbin....I think folks now don't seem to worry as much about that.....I do have to say...that I like using thread that is thinner like "so fine" or "bottom line" as you can wind more on a bobbin....it really doesn't take that long to reload a bobbin and I usually wind several before I start......pre-wounds hold even more thread and lots of folks like to use them too......Lin

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I converted my Ult 2 to an M system about eight years ago.  I did it because I didn't like changing bobbins so often especially with TEX 40 thread.  It seemed like it was just a few minutes sewing before I had to change bobbins.  But mostly I changed it because I noticed that I experienced most of my tension issues immediately after changing bobbins.  L bobbin twice as many changes, M bobbin half as many.  L bobbin twice as many chances for tension problems.  Jim

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Congratulations and welcome to the gang!  Thank you for the update.   I've had Millie's since 2007 and love her them to death.  I stayed with the L Bobbin due to the initial thought that the M Bobbin tension wasn't as good as the L.  Less backlash.   I can say that I totally love my L Bobbins,  I've never had a problem with tension using them.   I don't wind my own bobbins because I prefer the prewounds, especially the magna-bobbins from Fil-Tech (can't remember their new name right now).  I know I have to change my bobbins often but it's a quick change.  I don't even have to look under the quilt/machine to put the bobbin case back in the machine any longer.  I just pop out the case, pop in a new bobbin, and  snap the case back in place without looking.  Basically it's what your  preferences is, what makes you feel comfortable.   I'm getting ready to order a new Millie 30 and my mind is telling me to stay with the L, why tempt fate, lol. 


Connie
Port Huron, MI   48060
APQS Sales Rep and Educator
Millennium with Intelliquilter (IQ)

"Be a good listener, your ears will never get you in trouble" Frank Tygr


sewsweetgator@aol.com
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Congratulations and welcome. I have the M bobbin. On my previous mid arm machine I had an L bobbin. I prefer the M bobbin so I don’t have to change the bobbin so often. Someone here said she changed to the M bobbin and was able to do it herself. 

Deb. 


 

 

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