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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/26/2017 in all areas

  1. 7 points
    I dew quilting

    Vintage Quilt

    This is a customer quilt that I recently finished. It has been delivered so I can share The top is about 40 years old. She loves vintage pieces. The top is 74X90, with a lot of open space. She didn't want any quilting on the face or arms but said do whatever I wanted with feathers and pebbles. Had fun quilting this one. All quilting is freehand on my Millie. 2 layers of batting, 80/20 on the bottom and wool on the top, SoFine thread. Sorry can only load one picture
  2. 2 points
    Here are a few more Collage projects I just finished . I am teaching and have the opportunity to offer this technique through a satelite class hosted by Sharon Blackmore of Love Shack Quilts, if you are interested here is the link ( https://www.loveshackquilts.ca/product-page/terry-s-collage-workshop-satellite ). I will give you preparation videos to be ready for the class on Sept 30th, Then she will video me though out the day with tips on how to get started, cutting tips, eye options, finishing your project to be able to hang it. I encourage to jump out of your box and create a one of a kind project. The videos will be live so you will be able to ask questions as I am being videoed. The videos stay on the facebook page so you will be able to go back and watch them over and over or watch at a later date if you are busy that day. Or if you are in the Airdrie Alberta area I would love to teach you in person. This is a fun and freeing process once you get going you can have a lot of fun.
  3. 2 points
    quilterkp

    FIFTEEN Quilt tops!

    I am in the process of deciding between an APQS and an Innova. I can't buy for two years, but in that time, plan to decide which machine to buy and also am going to practice by renting time on Innova and APQS longarms. A dear friend has given me 15 tops to quilt for her! She pieced all but one of them. One she purchased for $1 from a garage sale. It is pretty bad -- hand pieced and not even, but practice is practice! One of them is a darling chicken quilt and another is a top of hers that I have admired for years. Some of them want pantos and others are demanding custom. And, of course, there are the rebels that just aren't saying anything. Some of them are gorgeous and others, not so much. This is going to be FABULOUS practice for me. I am so excited!!!! And I will be posting them on here for ideas for quilting.
  4. 1 point
    PamelaG

    Ordering a new Millie (gulp)

    My friend is a dealer and has let me play with her Millie. Just put in an order and am somewhat panicking. Finding room, cost, etc. Husband said okay as long as you can pay it back by quilting. So am researching starting a long arm business. There are apparently many other long arm quilters in my area. Can you all share tips on starting that business and truly making it work? And maybe calm me down in my fear that I'm making a huge expensive mistake. Pamela Tucson, Az
  5. 1 point
    Mary Beth

    I cleaned my studio

    If I ever get a different house, I will be in charge of the quilt studio, and it WILL NOT include carpet!
  6. 1 point
    Sharon Deming

    I cleaned my studio

    OMG. Rip that stuff up andput down some self-adhesive something or other- even on the bare subflooring. And hard smooth surface is better than ANY shag carpet!
  7. 1 point
    loraquilts

    Ordering a new Millie (gulp)

    Pam, you're going to love it. Promise! (if you bought the 30" Millie and decide you made a mistake, give me a shout. I may be able to take it off your hands) ... But before you despair, give it a good try. Breaking into longarm quilting as a business is going to be challenging, but with perseverance and LOTS of practice, you can make a go of it. I'm in San Diego and there are tons of longarm quilters here. You have to develop your skills so that you can compete, not only in terms of price and turn around time, but in terms of quality for your customers. Find what you like to do best -- pantos, meander, freehand, or custom. I specialize in custom quilting, but will also do pantos when my customers don't want to pay for custom work. You may want to go to a local quilt store that does charity quilts and ask them if you can quilt some of their charity quilts for FREE. This is a good way for you to get some practice in on your machine. Do a dozen of the free charity quilts (or more if needed) until you get to the point where your circles are round (you'll understand this one once you start playing with freehand circles), and your lines are smooth. After you return the free quilts, ask the store if you can leave some business cards with them. Most quilt stores have a display rack for this purpose -- usually near the register. Join a quilt guild, if you have the time. The people in the guild are usually very friendly and helpful. Many of them will already have a longarm quilter that they are using and are loyal to, so you need to come up with some enticement for them to give you a try. ..... maybe turnaround time or price will get some to give you a chance. I know in my area most of the longarm quilters only do pantos, so with me specializing in custom work, I get a lot of customers that way and then the word spreads. If you have an embroidery machine, you can offer to make a free custom embroidery label for first time customers. I do this and find that my customers really like that little extra "thank you". Then on future orders, they order an embroidered label for their quilts. It's a win-win. Make a very conservative plan at first -- how many quilts will you need to do to recover the cost of the machine and how long will it take you to get and complete orders. In the beginning, your biggest challenge is going to be finding customers. Your order quantity will be low, but as you become known, it should pick up. Plan on recovering the cost of your machine over several years, not just one. For example, if you spent $25K on the machine and will charge an average of $120 per queen sized quilt, and can reasonably expect to get three customer orders per month, you can recover the cost of the machine in six years. Of course the three quilts a month may be difficult to find in the first year, but by year three to six, you may be doing many more than three quilts per month. I just read back over what I've written. I hope that you don't get discouraged by the fact that at first things may be more challenging than rewarding. This post was meant to give you a dose of reality rather than just paint a rosy picture. Be patient and set realistic expectations. Once you get going, I think you really will love it. You can always post here to get words of encouragement as well. I have found the men and women on this forum are EXCEPTIONAL!!! They are honest, friendly, and always helpful. Welcome! Wishing you much success on your new adventure!
  8. 1 point
    Cagey

    FIFTEEN Quilt tops!

    While not longarm quilting, you could SID on your DSM using invisible thread to help hide the somewhat straight lines. Once the funky tops are stabilized you might be able to roll the whole sandwich onto the longarm and quilt away as you see fit. Though a non-sitdown quilter would have to tell you if this is feasible. If not, quilting on your DSM or a sit-down machine is great learning too. Cagey
  9. 1 point
    Sheri Butler

    FIFTEEN Quilt tops!

    Use the "Canned Soup" method on that quilt when you longarm it...and remember STEAM will be your best friend thru that! ALOT of us have longarmed those older wonky quilts. Those big "D" cups that poke out at you require you to decide whether you put a full can of soup on it (in the can of course)....or you create a crease in it. Ask the quilt top owner which she prefers, and let her know there probably WILL be issues with it considering it is not square. Always inform them of this BEFORE you quilt it.
  10. 1 point
    Bliss Quilter

    2013 APQS Lenni for SALE

    Sharon, If you do FB there is a group "Longarm & Accessories 4 Sale, Also, if you do Instagram post it there. Good Luck. You will love Millie!
  11. 1 point
    bttyboopette

    First quilt path panto attempt

    Got the binding done today!
  12. 1 point
    Sharon Deming

    FIFTEEN Quilt tops!

    - Yup - hand quilting needed. I know a couple of people in my area who do it for others, so there is likely someone in your area willing to do it, too. I have a friend who is hand quilting a very old and wildly distorted and wonky - and she is just doing her best. It would be impossible on a longarm.
  13. 1 point
    RosemaryJ08

    Two quilts finished....

    Absolutely Beautiful Vicki, I am also new to Long Arm and the site, so Thank you Mary Ann for bringing this up again.. There are so many beautiful quilts !! Thanks everyone for sharing your talents.. Piecing and Quilting!!
  14. 1 point
    Charlene

    Size of Quilting Design?

    I use the size of the block many times to determine the size of the quilting. I don't want the size of the quilting the same size as the block. I either make it smaller than the block size or larger. It just depends on the size of the prints. For a larger print, a larger pattern, etc.
  15. 1 point
    Gator

    Size of Quilting Design?

    It all depends on your batting and what your eye likes. Your batting info will tell you how close your quilting needs to be.
  16. 1 point
    Robin

    Size of Quilting Design?

    I think a flower the size of the pink one in the lower left hand corner of your first picture would be a nice size. Just my humble opinion.... Robin in MT
  17. 1 point
    MaryQuiltsTx

    Size of Quilting Design?

    I've often wondered this myself Rosemary and I did a sort of test....I made three charity quilts from the same pattern, similar to what you are showing. I quilted each one differently ....one looser, one medium, and one closer. I laid them over the back of the couch for a few days just to see if one of them would look "wrong" to me when I passed by. Had my husband and daughter do the same thing. None of them looked wrong to us. You actually couldn't tell much difference between the medium and dense or the medium and loose. The biggest difference was between the loose and dense. But they didn't look bad so I think it is personal preference and your batting that dictates your spacing. FYI: my idea of close=@ 1/2"-1" medium @1 1/2"-2" loose @ 2 1/2"-3"
  18. 1 point
    dbams

    Size of Quilting Design?

    Rosemary, I don't know that there is really any "rule of thumb" on this. You do need to check your batting, because it will say the maximum distance for quilting, but I think 1.5" to 2" should not be a problem for batting. Pretty much, I go with what pleases me, unless it is a quilt for a charity, like Quilts For Kids, which have requirements for quilting density. Cute quilt!
  19. 1 point
    Quilta93

    Totally finished with label

    Very nice label. Binding looks good to me. Deb.
  20. 1 point
    MaryQuiltsTx

    Totally finished with label

    Nice label. Who cares how the binding got on there, it looks great and it's done!
  21. 1 point
    dlnewell

    Totally finished with label

    My hands don't go numb, but I don't like sewing down the binding by hand either. I often do it by machine...unless it's for a show quilt.
  22. 1 point
    Plumpurple

    Totally finished with label

    Love it, very nice, and your binding looks way too good to even give "machine sewn" a second thought!