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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/23/2021 in Posts

  1. This is the system I guessed. The after market wheels have much wider bearing placement than the OEM's, and as a result they are much more stable. I hesitate to make recommendations because I'm not sure they would work, but if it were me, I would try to find a set of Edgerider wheels for an old Gammill Classic and see if I couldn't fit them to my Lenni. I have a set of those on my Ult 2 and they work fine. The "V" shape for the Edgerider wheel will solidly position it on the rail so there would be no back and forth movement allowed by the "U" shape of the OEM wheels. I was able to fit a set to my machine by simply buying Imperial bolts and nuts to replace the metrics supplied with the Edgerider set, and adjusting for any machine height change the new wheels made. I don't know whether Edgerider wheels are still available for Gammill Classics machines or not. They also are a bit pricey. I think I paid about $200 for a set 10 years ago. The other issue is the lack of adjustment offered in the Lenni table you have. I built my table so I could adjust the height of my leveling and take-up roller. I don't think the roller height can be adjusted on yours. If you decide to pursue this modification, I'd suggest you contact a Gammill dealer or Kasa Engineering directly to check the availability of the wheel set. If they are no longer available then the whole modification possibility is mute. Good luck. If there is anything more I can tell you, feel free to ask. Jim
    1 point
  2. SueD

    Cutting Off a Customer?

    Just my opinion here so take it for what it's worth. I don't quilt as a business and my quilting for others has been limited to handful of charity quilts..... It would seem unlikely that someone looking at the low-skill-level quilt would be doing so in order to select a longarmer for their own project. It's probably not on display as a sample reference of your work or a showpiece, but being used as a quilt. In my limited experience, people who don't do their own quilting don't notice flaws. I haven't done many quilts, but I notice every bump and wobble and others just ooh and aah over how great it looks. As with many artistic endeavors, we are our own worst critics. Bottom line is it's your choice to accept or decline a customer. I'm thinking it's more likely that you will get more bad references from the "fired" customer than potential lost customers noticing pleats/tucks in another customer's quilt.
    1 point
  3. 1 point
  4. Will

    Cutting Off a Customer?

    Well this is a tricky question like many that have pointed out you are renting the machine and they are quilting it, HOWEVER it also sounds like you are spending even more time assisting this person instead of just quilting it yourself. This is where boundaries must be established in the beginning. I don't rent my machine, for several reasons but that is another topic. I do know several others that have rental programs and most of them require a basic training class before even letting them rent their machine. But during this basic training you then need to set the boundaries that YOU are not there to hold their hand all the time, you obviously have other things to do that is why you are renting your machine. When people rent a car do they expect the rental company to be with them the whole time explaining what all the car does ??? No they don't they provide a basic understanding and then it is understood that the person driving has and understanding of driving a car. I know that it not exactly apples to apples, but I think you get my drift. NOW as far as those of us that do quilt for customers I have a similar situation I've had this customer that has now brought me in 2 absolutely terrible quilt tops, I spend a great deal of time trying to make them look the best that they can, but they still look God awful, and here is my problem with "well it's just a quilt that will be loved and the customer will be happy to have it quilted" There will be others that might look at this quilt and what do you think the first thing they will notice ??? that's right they will notice all the pleats and tucks and all that is bad, and guess what they will immediately think ? "Who quilted this" so no I don't agree to quilt someones treasure just because it is going to be loved. I have a reputation and granted I'm not always the friendliest person, but guess what I always have a waiting time for my quilting. I will be honest I'm having a hard time with HOW to tell this lady that I just cannot continue to quilt tops that are in this type of condition. My problem is I don't have a very good filter and tend to say exactly what I think sometimes, I think that is why most of my customers actually like me. I don't take advantage of anyone and I tell the truth. Okay this reply went WAY longer than I expected. The bottom line and something that I need to revisit myself is SETTING EXPECTATIONS !!! No matter what it is even if it means losing a customer if you set the tone then you are normally respected and they can not say they were never told anything. Thank you, The Grumpy old MAN quilter in Texas.
    1 point
  5. Spam reported
    1 point
  6. I have the Circle Lord front/back stylus system with accessories. $250 plus shipping I have the queen size baptist fan $215 plus shipping SOLD I have a zipper system for 126" ( for backing and for bottom of quilt top) $15 plus shipping Have 3 18" square templates: background tiny filler, curved crosshatch and medallion: $35 each plus shipping or $75 for all 3 plus shipping. SOLD Brand new Red Snappers for a 12 ft table. $35 plus shipping SOLD Contact me: mwakefield@scspk12.org or 417-838-1036
    1 point
  7. If you want to choose only one , go with the Bliss system. Quilt Glide evens out the stitch regulator for micro-quilting and while it's nice to have, it won't be used often and it's not a necessity. Bliss is great and makes a huge difference for smooth quilting. I retro-fitted mine and it cost $3000 plus shipping. It was a good decision. Best, of course, to try out both additions first---maybe the dealer knows an accommodating owner locally who will allow you to try theirs.
    1 point
  8. SueD

    Forum rules?

    I know there isn't much activity on here with so many groups available on Facebook. (Too bad because to me this is more user friendly than FB.) However, I still check it regularly and find lots of useful information. I also regularly report spam posts that are clearly not related to quilting or quilting machines. That being said, where do we find the forum rules? I agree this post isn't appropriate for a Forum. It's general advertising for the manufacturer's website - not even a specific dealer.
    1 point
  9. Thanks for stating your position Mark. I know APQS is not afraid of being compared to the competition but I don’t see anything that makes me think this anything more than a competitor advertising on your forum. Nigel
    1 point
  10. APQS Does allow any brand of long arm machine to be sold on this Forum. I am watching to see if this person puts anything else suspicious on our forum. So for now I am leaving this up.
    1 point
  11. jimerickson

    M&m wheels

    Monika: The table you have will determine what wheel options that are available. Can you post photos? A picture of the table, and a picture of the wheels on your Lenni will help. Jim
    1 point
  12. All five you mention are good industrial quality machines. APQS, Gammill and Innova have their own robot systems. I think A-1 and Nolting use Kasa Engineering's IntelliQuilt system. Something to think about. Let me preface what I have to say by saying I have not studied the features closely in about 5 years, so some of what I say may no longer be accurate. While the primary features of all these machines are pretty much the same, there are little differences that can affect how happy you will be when using each. Bobbin size is one. All offer M size bobbins, but a couple still offer L size. Personally, I would not consider an L, but some folks love them. All of the top of the line models have high quality robust tables, but the features from company to company do differ. Here's where there is probably more differences than any other aspect of the quilting systems. Batting access is one item. Innova, Nolting, and A-1 offer roller lift systems that allow you to access the batting as you go. APQS does not, and Gammill's system is a joke as far as I'm concerned. At least one (Innova) has gas strut assisted lift assembly to reduce the lift effort. I think only APQS and A-1 offer power advance and retreat. I'm not sure all of these manufacturers offer power lift features or not. Take up roller structures also differ. APQS an Innova have dual rollers so that no adjustment of take-up roller height is necessary. I think both Gammill and A-1 have single adjusting wheels for raising the take-up roller, while you have to adjust both ends of the Nolting roller. What you plan to do with the machine has a lot to do with the items you find most necessary. Robot use may value some features (M bobbin for instance) differently than hand guided. Edge to edge is different than custom work. If you plan to do robotic quilting, then the features of the robot system itself, and the ease of use becomes very important. Finally, support is important. I think all five company's support their product well. I personally only have experience with APQS, and Gammill, both of which have been very good. If you study each system carefully, and pick the features that fit your type quilting, a quilting system from any one of these companies will serve you well. Start thinking about important aspects of your planned quilting, and study how the different machines support your "style". Careful consideration of this should help you choose properly. Good luck. Jim
    1 point
  13. I would consider this inappropriate.
    1 point
  14. Plumpurple

    Circle Lord

    Hi, I am looking for the large Circle Lord boards Star Dance or Milky Way. I have been contacted to do some Quilts of Valor and would love to volunteer, however my skills are limited. Does any one who has gone computerized have either of these patterns they would be willing to sell? Thanks, Sharon
    1 point
  15. All of the brands that you mention are reputable. The best thing you could do is to check to see if there are any large quilt shows scheduled in your area where you could go and try the different machines. It is a little like buying a car, one make and model doesn't fit everyone. APQS has road shows in various parts of the country and they are a good place to start. I don't know if the other companies do anything similar. It is a good idea to stick with a company that produces purpose built industrial machines and has been in the business for a long time. There are lots of machines out there that are just little more than a stretched version of a DSM. Buyer beware! Check if you are able to do the maintenance yourself or if the machine has to be shipped back to the factory? Is telephone support available? Is there any training offered when you buy the machine? Think carefully about the throat size. There often seem to be quite a number of smaller machines for sale as owners decide that they would prefer a machine with a larger throat. Have you checked out the APQS demo machines? They come available occasionally and are a good deal. I bought my Millie during a demo sale and have been very happy with it. Good luck with your search and welcome to the forum.
    1 point
  16. Peach click on Daniel’s screen name and you will see a way to send a message. That will go straight to his email. Works for most online forums. Nigel
    1 point
  17. ffq-lar

    M&m wheels

    Hi Monika. What you own is a pre-2000 Ultima longarm, not a Lenny. I don't know if that wooden table can even be upgraded to the Bliss system, which replace heavy-duty aluminum rails not used on your frame. The wheels are wood composite and I don't know if M&M wheels available now are a match to the ones on your machine. After 2000, APQS used edgerider wheels---that are horizontal and ride on the edge of the rail instead of on top. To investigate solutions for easier movement on those wheels, you should check that the tracks are pristinely clean without oxidation build-up, and clean the grooves of the wheels with alcohol on a Q-tip to remove any oxidation build-up there. Investigate if there are bad bearings in the wheels (they should turn easily) and that they aren't bent on the axles, which would cause drag. Drag can also be caused by a flexed/torqued table, so make sure it's level front-to-back in several places and along the length. If you can isolate where the drag is (like the length of the table means to check the frame rails and wheels, or front to back check the carriage wheels) it will be easier to diagnose. If it's in one distinct spot, the frame needs to be leveled. If you were able to stitch nice curves before, you should be able to again. New wheels won't fix that unless the things that support the wheels are correctly aligned. Good luck and email your closest dealer for more advice.
    1 point
  18. SueD

    Hopping foot

    If you email or call APQS, they will tell you what you need and give you the pricing.
    1 point
  19. Austin Bell

    skipping stitches

    Have you reviewed page 108 in the manual that offers some explanations of why it could be skipping stitches? I would rethread everything and start over with a finer thread in the bobbin and the upper thread like Bottom Line, or Glide. Pages 23-25 of the manual shows how to set the needle. You need to match the size of the needle to the thickness of the thread. If you're using a thicker thread like Perma Core, YLI, Omni you will need to use a little larger needle. Are you pulling down 6-8" of bobbin thread so you can bring up your bobbin thread and have enough upper thread and bobbin thread to hold on to when you start to quilt? I hope one of these tips help.
    1 point
  20. Do you measure the quilt tops before loading? That would give you advance warning that there is a problem. If it is always the right side that is longer, I have to wonder if it is something you are doing as you advance the quilt, as Debbie mentioned above, or if your leaders are not quite square. Debbie gave good advice.
    1 point
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