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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/16/2021 in Posts

  1. This is the system I guessed. The after market wheels have much wider bearing placement than the OEM's, and as a result they are much more stable. I hesitate to make recommendations because I'm not sure they would work, but if it were me, I would try to find a set of Edgerider wheels for an old Gammill Classic and see if I couldn't fit them to my Lenni. I have a set of those on my Ult 2 and they work fine. The "V" shape for the Edgerider wheel will solidly position it on the rail so there would be no back and forth movement allowed by the "U" shape of the OEM wheels. I was able to fit a set to my machine by simply buying Imperial bolts and nuts to replace the metrics supplied with the Edgerider set, and adjusting for any machine height change the new wheels made. I don't know whether Edgerider wheels are still available for Gammill Classics machines or not. They also are a bit pricey. I think I paid about $200 for a set 10 years ago. The other issue is the lack of adjustment offered in the Lenni table you have. I built my table so I could adjust the height of my leveling and take-up roller. I don't think the roller height can be adjusted on yours. If you decide to pursue this modification, I'd suggest you contact a Gammill dealer or Kasa Engineering directly to check the availability of the wheel set. If they are no longer available then the whole modification possibility is mute. Good luck. If there is anything more I can tell you, feel free to ask. Jim
    1 point
  2. SueD

    Cutting Off a Customer?

    Just my opinion here so take it for what it's worth. I don't quilt as a business and my quilting for others has been limited to handful of charity quilts..... It would seem unlikely that someone looking at the low-skill-level quilt would be doing so in order to select a longarmer for their own project. It's probably not on display as a sample reference of your work or a showpiece, but being used as a quilt. In my limited experience, people who don't do their own quilting don't notice flaws. I haven't done many quilts, but I notice every bump and wobble and others just ooh and aah over how great it looks. As with many artistic endeavors, we are our own worst critics. Bottom line is it's your choice to accept or decline a customer. I'm thinking it's more likely that you will get more bad references from the "fired" customer than potential lost customers noticing pleats/tucks in another customer's quilt.
    1 point
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