quiltmonkey

Dealer
  • Content Count

    12,518
  • Joined

  • Days Won

    43

Reputation Activity

  1. Upvote
    quiltmonkey reacted to LinneaMarie in What to do about pokies!   
    I finally did finish it. And Shana is right; it was the backing because it was homespun loose woven stuff. But I changed to Quilters Dream BLACK poly so all went great after that. 
    On a side note, I used it on a set of placemats and the backing was RJR Thimbleberries from a long time ago. I had the same problem!
  2. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to mamu in Trapunto look without wool batting   
    Use poly extra loft for the trapunto and cotton for the foundation
  3. Like
    quiltmonkey got a reaction from LinneaMarie in What to do about pokies!   
    LinneaMarie, it's not the batting, it's the backing fabric. Can you change the backing fabric?
  4. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to Gator in Minkie/Fireside back problems   
    I use glide thread top and bottom not problems.  Do you ask your customers where they bought the minkie?  There are some really terrible copycats out there.  I have problems with the cheap brands.  I prefer "cuddle" over minkie, it comes out perfect every time.
  5. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to Gator in Robyn   
    I don't know anything about compuquilter but Zoltan at Intelliquilter now services them.  There is one guy quilter on here who knows a lot about the compuquilter also, hopefully he will chime in.
  6. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to RunningThreads in Robyn   
    Connie
    I think you are thinking of zeke.  Robyn click on the envelope icon at the top of the page and send a message to zeke I think he is the most knowledgeable Computer-Quilter person here.
     
    Nigel
  7. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to LinneaMarie in What to do about pokies!   
    I've got POKIES!! I hate pokies. I thought it was me, but this is the second quilt with them. The first was for me; just placemat. This one is a customer and it's homespun front and BACK! I'm using Hobbs 80/20. It used to be wonderful; not so much anymore!! So i'm thinking of taking out two rows and using Quilters Dream Blend. Shoulda known!!
     
  8. Upvote
    quiltmonkey reacted to dlnewell in Hello Everyone!   
    Hey Fellow Longarmers!
    I've been MIA for some time now, but Still Quilting!  I've had a couple of grandbabies, family members' illnesses and deaths, and you know...life in general.
    I have also been cleaning and decluttering my quilt quilting studio.  I have a Quilt Topper Tool circle maker with a star board and two feather wreath boards that I would love to part with.  The base fits a Milli machine.  It's yours for the cost of shipping.  I bought it used when I first started quilting, but do mostly heirloom custom quilting and don't and won't use it. 
    Please take this off my hands, or should I say, out of my studio.
    Have a great day!
    Debbie
  9. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to micajah in What to do about pokies!   
    Perhaps you should call her to come see what is happening to her quilt before you try to fix anything. None of the problems are related to anything you have done -it is all due to the materials she has given you.  
    Debbie
  10. Upvote
    quiltmonkey reacted to Quilta93 in Baby Quilt   
    So cute!! Love the quilting!
  11. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to RunningThreads in Man Quilter   
    Man quilter is Matt Sparrow.  He had a blog for a few years and some videos under that name.  It looks like the manquilter.com site has gone dormant but the Sparrow Quilt Company is still going strong.  Here is a video that may be what you are looking for.   Leader grips and red snappers are the same principle.  
    https://youtu.be/yx5mXoHwvuw
    Nigel
  12. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to ffq-lar in COVID 19 and Quilt Intake   
    I have my customers put the parts in a seal-able bag (like a big Zip-loc) and drop it in front of my garage. I put out a wire bin on a small table that is under cover. We may talk at a distance. They put any instructions in the bag. I wear protective gloves, wipe the bag thoroughly with a disinfectant, then it goes into an un-used, un-heated shop for three days (or longer).  I phone to discuss choices of thread and quilting. After quilting, she picks up in the same way and she uses whatever method she's comfortable with to assure it's safe. I'm in Washington State where people are advised to disinfect anything that comes into your living spaces. And I have a hubby with some lung problems so I'm not taking any chances. So far no one has balked and everyone is dropping off. I do four quilts a month so it isn't a parade of customers. One thing that stuck with me was a statement that "if you overreact, you'll never know if it was the right decision. If you under-react, you will know immediately". Stay well and safe. And if you decide it's necessary to stop all contact, provisions are in place to provide benefits to self-employed workers.
  13. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to ffq-lar in SCRIM on bTTING   
    With all batting, the scrim goes next to the backer---so it faces down. With that said, most scrimmed cotton batting has the scrim buried within the layers. The fibers are needle-punched into  the scrim (a sheet of very strong and very thin polyester) and the key to placement is the direction of that needle punching. Your machine needle should go through in the same direction as the needle punching. So look at the batting---one side is smoother and has tiny visible holes (dimples). The other side will be rougher-looking and a bit raggedy (pimples). So the rule is "show your dimples---up---and hide your pimples---down". Another way to tell is most batting is folded with the "good" side out, just like fabric. That good side goes up and the uglier side down---look for the center crease/fold line. Make it a mountain instead of a valley when it's loaded. Poly batting may have a chemical scrim---an application of a chemical that bonds the poly fibers on only one side. That side feels much rougher and it will be placed next to the backer. Hope this is helpful.
  14. Like
    quiltmonkey got a reaction from dianne31331 in Ruler work   
    Custom work using rulers - this is a highly specialized skill that take months, if not years to perfect. If it were me, I would charge by the hour, not by square inch. Don't underestimate your time and skills. I rarely do ruler quilting for customers because it's so expensive. I find other ways to quilt, or I choose to use minimal amount of rulers and then freehand the rest (combination) Find the going rate for custom heirloom quilting in your area, or ask other quilters in your area what they charge for ruler work. If I were doing ruler work, I would charge at least $35 per hour. For estimates, you could guess that it takes 40 hours and give them a quote. I'm not giving my time away for minimum wage. No way!  I've had many customers ask me to SID their quilt. I kindly explain the costs and time involved and I offer other solutions for them. 
  15. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to RunningThreads in Anita Heath   
    Sounds like needle flex could be a big part of your problem.  A larger needle and a shorter stitch length will reduce flex and should help. How old is the machine?  If it is a little old I would be checking for worn bushings in the needle bar.  I had this happen to me with one of our APQS machines years ago with a new shipment of needles, same brand and size.  The cure was to redo the timing and all was good.
     
    Let us know what you find.
    Nigel
  16. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to srichardson in Dawn Retired?   
    Good luck to you Dawn.  Thank you for all you have done over the years and for sharing your wisdom.  We will miss you.
  17. Upvote
    quiltmonkey got a reaction from Lauralorene in Ruler work   
    Custom work using rulers - this is a highly specialized skill that take months, if not years to perfect. If it were me, I would charge by the hour, not by square inch. Don't underestimate your time and skills. I rarely do ruler quilting for customers because it's so expensive. I find other ways to quilt, or I choose to use minimal amount of rulers and then freehand the rest (combination) Find the going rate for custom heirloom quilting in your area, or ask other quilters in your area what they charge for ruler work. If I were doing ruler work, I would charge at least $35 per hour. For estimates, you could guess that it takes 40 hours and give them a quote. I'm not giving my time away for minimum wage. No way!  I've had many customers ask me to SID their quilt. I kindly explain the costs and time involved and I offer other solutions for them. 
  18. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to Gator in Getting started on Millie 2005   
    Patty,
    APQS on You Tube and Quilted Joy Clubhouse (Angela Huffman)on You Tube are both great sites for videos.   I'm not sure if Myrna Ficken has videos but not sure if she has them online but your could google her.   Be sure to join the I love APQS group on Facebook also.   This should et you started.
  19. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to Kueser in Ruler work   
    I still find it amusing that folks think stitch in the ditch is an easy and cheap way to get their quilt quilted. 
  20. Like
    quiltmonkey got a reaction from Gail O in Ruler work   
    Custom work using rulers - this is a highly specialized skill that take months, if not years to perfect. If it were me, I would charge by the hour, not by square inch. Don't underestimate your time and skills. I rarely do ruler quilting for customers because it's so expensive. I find other ways to quilt, or I choose to use minimal amount of rulers and then freehand the rest (combination) Find the going rate for custom heirloom quilting in your area, or ask other quilters in your area what they charge for ruler work. If I were doing ruler work, I would charge at least $35 per hour. For estimates, you could guess that it takes 40 hours and give them a quote. I'm not giving my time away for minimum wage. No way!  I've had many customers ask me to SID their quilt. I kindly explain the costs and time involved and I offer other solutions for them. 
  21. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to ffq-lar in Beware of trolls and fraudulent members on this forum!!!   
    Hi MB! Those were the days, huh? What a great group! Through our forum friendships I got to personally meet Barb Mayfield (Washington like me), Mary Beth (Missouri), Shana (Alaska),  Rita Armstrong (North Carolina), Dell D (Florida), Myrna Ficken, Linda Alexander (remember her?), Dawn, almost the entire APQS sales group and a couple of techs, an entire group of owners from the Portland,OR area---we started a great longarming group--and many sisters I've never met. Yes, we had a few clunkers (remember Michaelalan---the dismissive man-splainer?) and cried along with family when we lost a few. I miss the old forum but I love FB and enjoy seeing lots of the old forum friends there.
  22. Like
    quiltmonkey got a reaction from Jan E. in How is your quilting business?   
    Regardless of what you've heard about "saturated", I still think you should follow your dreams and create a business plan. Stick to the plan. Give yourself time now to practice, build up skills, market your business. You will SLOWLY build up clientele. By the time you retire, you should be up on step with a steady customer base.
    I will tell you that customers like to try out other/new longarmers. So, don't be surprised once word gets around that you are in business. 
    As a business person, it's always good to find your niche in the market and get your name out there. That niche could be as simple as your friendly personality or your quick turnaround time. Advertising is expensive, but spending money on a Facebook page, paying for a blurb in the local longarm newsletters or even in the local advertising newspaper, creating cute business cards and trifold to hand out to potential customers. You have to get your name and face out there. It's who you know that gets the word of mouth moving around. Make quilts and put them in the local fair. Create quilts and DONATE them to charity fundraisers. Donating quilts to fundraisers gets your name out there as a business person. Attend guild meetings or other craft groups and hand out your cards and trifolds. Talk to local shops about displaying your information. Eventually when you can afford it, buy a domain name and create a web site. Customers like to look at your site on the internet. Be creative-- think out of the box on your advertising angles. You'll be surprised that even in a saturated market, you can find your place. Follow your dreams. 
  23. Like
    quiltmonkey reacted to ffq-lar in How is your quilting business?   
    The number of quilters with longarms and mid-arms has risen like crazy in the past four years in my area. If you can spend the five to seven years left to sharpening your skills while taking a few customers here and there, go for it. It hasn't impacted my business, but I do primarily custom and have little competition. My quilts come from those who save the big ones and the special ones for me---I do 4 per month and sometimes struggle to get them done. Mine is a different situation so if you are able to analyse the competition, see if you can figure out a niche market. Are there lots of overall/e2e quilters so you'll be competing with them? Are there Modern quilters looking for a kindred-spirit longarmer? Is the custom market fully covered? Also, would you be happy to purchase a used machine to start out and upgrade to a new w/computer later? Please remember as well, the longarmer who advised you only has her best interests at heart---not yours. Though her advice may be spot-on, don't be deterred until you do some more research.
  24. Like
    quiltmonkey got a reaction from Schlick in Same size Backing and Top   
    Even if you sew scraps of fabric to all four sides, if the quilt top is the same size as the back, it's absolutely impossible to avoid quilting the extra strip's seam line into the quilt while quilting it. Trust me in my 15 years of longarm quilting, it is nearly impossible to accomplish this very difficult and extremely stressful situation. 
    I would contact customer and ask her to provide you with larger backing fabric that is at a minimum 8" wider and  8" longer than the quilt top. 
    My job is to quilt the customer's quilt without pulling my hair out... it's not my job to perform miracles due to the failure of the customer to provide ample backing fabric. IMHO. 
  25. Like
    quiltmonkey got a reaction from tootsquilts in Same size Backing and Top   
    Adding one more thing:  I am (by nature) a very accommodating and nice person. Probably too nice sometimes. In dealing with my quilting customers, the word "no" is not a word I use, ever. Very rare situations when I need to tell a customer the word "no" ... and this situation is generally the only time I stand up for myself and say "No! Sorry, my requirement is to have 8" wider and 8" longer than quilt top." Period. End of story. I've almost hurt myself numerous times trying to quilt a quilt with barely enough backing fabric. It's dangerous. I draw the line when it comes to injuring myself because of a customer did not give me enough backing fabric.