Sheagatzi

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  1. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from redhotmama in Locking stitches and hopping to another spot..   
    I have no idea what it's called.  I have a quilt with a clamshell/sashiko design,  and in certain areas are some appliqué circles that I have to either 'hop' over to the other side or stop, lock stitches, tie off/bury threads,  restart on other side of appliqué shape.
     
    Have you locked stitches and then just hopped over without cutting threads?   (cut later?)  How do you approach this kind of thing? Is there some kind of youtube/tutorial that you know of that I can watch it done in action?   I saw on green fairy quilts youtube video (she did a diamond pattern) where she did this kind of hopping..but it was so quick, I could quite get it.
     
    How many tiny stitches do you take before you are confident that they will stay in place before 'hopping' to the next spot.  I've done a practice of it and my 6 tiny stitches in place still don't seem very secure.   -  when I trim the top threads and then flip to the backing side and trim - there seems to be a bit of stitching coming undone.  
     
    When you trim locked stitches,  do you snip the thread above the little knot that sometimes comes up, or below the knot?
  2. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from Quilta93 in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    Linda said it perfectly -   find 3 or so edge to edge patterns that you have mastered and can do without thinking and planning too much.   The more quilts you do,  the more you will perfect and create a system of loading, straightening, basting, etc.  
     
    Tools -  have a thread and bobbin system that gives you consistent thread tension and you don't have to waste time playing around with it all the time.   pre-wound bobbins also save time.     Many people prefer leader grips or red snappers for loading quilts as they find it quicker to load up a quilt.   
    distractions - laundry, coffee making, phone, internet, changing channels on the tv/radio all create distractions.  ( speaking from experience)
     
    Take one quilt and use it as a tool to really pay attention to where you are spending your time -  is it the physical quilting time that is taking so long, or is it all f the other things like clipping threads, loading, straightening, pressing, thinking, contemplating, auditioning colours, planning, winding thread, tidying areas...   I've done this a few times and realized that after each pass on an e2e I tend to 'wander' my focus.   Now that I am aware of it,  I allow myself some time to 'wander' but also the awareness gives me more focus to redirect back to the task.   Hope that makes sense.
     
    The one thing I haven't done yet is actually time myself and record in a little book - how long each quilt, design, size, etc takes me to quilt so that over time I can get a better idea of my average.   
     
    And again....like Linda said,  if you work too quickly you will make mistakes, your tension will futz and then your frustration will kick in.   :-)
  3. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from Quilta93 in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    Meant to add -   when I time myself, a tip I recently learned to keep in mind :  when working at a workplace, office, etc  you get up walk around, grab a coffee, go to the bathroom,  sometimes someone stops by your desk to ask you how your weekend was etc.  and you still get paid that hourly wage/salary -   so don't be super regimented with timing your actual quilting time either :-)  
     
    there is no way I could do 7 quilts in a day!! LOL  That is insane!  
  4. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from Gail O in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    Linda said it perfectly -   find 3 or so edge to edge patterns that you have mastered and can do without thinking and planning too much.   The more quilts you do,  the more you will perfect and create a system of loading, straightening, basting, etc.  
     
    Tools -  have a thread and bobbin system that gives you consistent thread tension and you don't have to waste time playing around with it all the time.   pre-wound bobbins also save time.     Many people prefer leader grips or red snappers for loading quilts as they find it quicker to load up a quilt.   
    distractions - laundry, coffee making, phone, internet, changing channels on the tv/radio all create distractions.  ( speaking from experience)
     
    Take one quilt and use it as a tool to really pay attention to where you are spending your time -  is it the physical quilting time that is taking so long, or is it all f the other things like clipping threads, loading, straightening, pressing, thinking, contemplating, auditioning colours, planning, winding thread, tidying areas...   I've done this a few times and realized that after each pass on an e2e I tend to 'wander' my focus.   Now that I am aware of it,  I allow myself some time to 'wander' but also the awareness gives me more focus to redirect back to the task.   Hope that makes sense.
     
    The one thing I haven't done yet is actually time myself and record in a little book - how long each quilt, design, size, etc takes me to quilt so that over time I can get a better idea of my average.   
     
    And again....like Linda said,  if you work too quickly you will make mistakes, your tension will futz and then your frustration will kick in.   :-)
  5. Upvote
    Sheagatzi reacted to ffq-lar in Quilting for show   
    Here's a tip if you want to leave the threads for your customer to knot and bury and keep them out of your way---insert a straight pin next to the exiting threads and wrap the two threads around the pin as many times as they can. They are now out of your way and easy for the customer to find and deal with. Watch out for pin pokes and glass heads pins hold better. The customer can give the pins back to you or you can charge a nominal amount for them. (This way you'll also see how many ends you would have needed to bury if you did them yourself!)
  6. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from Southern Quilts in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    Meant to add -   when I time myself, a tip I recently learned to keep in mind :  when working at a workplace, office, etc  you get up walk around, grab a coffee, go to the bathroom,  sometimes someone stops by your desk to ask you how your weekend was etc.  and you still get paid that hourly wage/salary -   so don't be super regimented with timing your actual quilting time either :-)  
     
    there is no way I could do 7 quilts in a day!! LOL  That is insane!  
  7. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from Oma in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    Linda said it perfectly -   find 3 or so edge to edge patterns that you have mastered and can do without thinking and planning too much.   The more quilts you do,  the more you will perfect and create a system of loading, straightening, basting, etc.  
     
    Tools -  have a thread and bobbin system that gives you consistent thread tension and you don't have to waste time playing around with it all the time.   pre-wound bobbins also save time.     Many people prefer leader grips or red snappers for loading quilts as they find it quicker to load up a quilt.   
    distractions - laundry, coffee making, phone, internet, changing channels on the tv/radio all create distractions.  ( speaking from experience)
     
    Take one quilt and use it as a tool to really pay attention to where you are spending your time -  is it the physical quilting time that is taking so long, or is it all f the other things like clipping threads, loading, straightening, pressing, thinking, contemplating, auditioning colours, planning, winding thread, tidying areas...   I've done this a few times and realized that after each pass on an e2e I tend to 'wander' my focus.   Now that I am aware of it,  I allow myself some time to 'wander' but also the awareness gives me more focus to redirect back to the task.   Hope that makes sense.
     
    The one thing I haven't done yet is actually time myself and record in a little book - how long each quilt, design, size, etc takes me to quilt so that over time I can get a better idea of my average.   
     
    And again....like Linda said,  if you work too quickly you will make mistakes, your tension will futz and then your frustration will kick in.   :-)
  8. Upvote
    Sheagatzi reacted to Quilting Heidi in Quilting for show   
    I knot and bury every quilt I do.  I don't find it any more time consuming than trying to do the tiny stitches.  I have seen quilts with ribbons and they didn't knot and bury though.  You have to decide what is right for you.
  9. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from Southern Quilts in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    Linda said it perfectly -   find 3 or so edge to edge patterns that you have mastered and can do without thinking and planning too much.   The more quilts you do,  the more you will perfect and create a system of loading, straightening, basting, etc.  
     
    Tools -  have a thread and bobbin system that gives you consistent thread tension and you don't have to waste time playing around with it all the time.   pre-wound bobbins also save time.     Many people prefer leader grips or red snappers for loading quilts as they find it quicker to load up a quilt.   
    distractions - laundry, coffee making, phone, internet, changing channels on the tv/radio all create distractions.  ( speaking from experience)
     
    Take one quilt and use it as a tool to really pay attention to where you are spending your time -  is it the physical quilting time that is taking so long, or is it all f the other things like clipping threads, loading, straightening, pressing, thinking, contemplating, auditioning colours, planning, winding thread, tidying areas...   I've done this a few times and realized that after each pass on an e2e I tend to 'wander' my focus.   Now that I am aware of it,  I allow myself some time to 'wander' but also the awareness gives me more focus to redirect back to the task.   Hope that makes sense.
     
    The one thing I haven't done yet is actually time myself and record in a little book - how long each quilt, design, size, etc takes me to quilt so that over time I can get a better idea of my average.   
     
    And again....like Linda said,  if you work too quickly you will make mistakes, your tension will futz and then your frustration will kick in.   :-)
  10. Upvote
    Sheagatzi reacted to Zora in Quilting for show   
    If they want to pay me adequately, I would be glad to knot and bury. If not, small stitches to start and end. Knotting and burying on heirloom custom takes forever and is not included in my prices. And on the one client quilt that was entered into MQS, and on which I knotted and buried every last one of the (seemingly) thousands of them..not one thing about starts and stops was mentioned on the judging sheet. Not even a box to check.
  11. Upvote
    Sheagatzi reacted to FloridaMissy in Quilting for show   
    I always knot and bury my threads for any customer who is entering a quilt in a show.  In fact it is my preferred method on all quilts.  I can tell you that when a customer says oh just do some simple cross hatching I just want to cringe as it can mean a thousand threads to knot and bury.
  12. Upvote
    Sheagatzi reacted to Sue E. in Quilting for show   
    I have only entered a couple of quilts into shows and I knotted and buried all my ends. I usually do this on all my quilts whether they are for show or not. I think it looks better. I also think that is what the judges are looking for. I hope others who do more "show" quilts will chime in.
  13. Upvote
    Sheagatzi reacted to ffq-lar in Quilting for show   
    Some of my customer send their quilts to Houston and Paducah. They can't afford my rates for knot-and-bury and none of them expects an award---just participation. Judges check the back for tension and good stitches. If they find snarls or obvious build-up where the starts and stops are, they will comment. But they don't usually comment unless there's an issue. I'm a tiny-stitches-and-clip kinda girl.That's why I use thin and blending thread in the bobbin.
  14. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from dramaqueenB in Tula Pink Butterfly Quilt   
    Hi everyone...I'm trying not be as addicted to this forum as I once was but I really love this quilt that I recently quilted and wanted to share.  I have really stepped up and challenged myself to go more into custom work.  I have a blog post that is pic heavy with more details of my quilting, but here is a snapshot.   This is The Butterfly Quilt by Tula Pink.  The piecer did unbelievable fussy cutting and piecing and so it made it even more fun to quilt.   
     

  15. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from mamaahma in Tula Pink Butterfly Quilt   
    Hi everyone...I'm trying not be as addicted to this forum as I once was but I really love this quilt that I recently quilted and wanted to share.  I have really stepped up and challenged myself to go more into custom work.  I have a blog post that is pic heavy with more details of my quilting, but here is a snapshot.   This is The Butterfly Quilt by Tula Pink.  The piecer did unbelievable fussy cutting and piecing and so it made it even more fun to quilt.   
     

  16. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from jzollin in Tula Pink Butterfly Quilt   
    Hi everyone...I'm trying not be as addicted to this forum as I once was but I really love this quilt that I recently quilted and wanted to share.  I have really stepped up and challenged myself to go more into custom work.  I have a blog post that is pic heavy with more details of my quilting, but here is a snapshot.   This is The Butterfly Quilt by Tula Pink.  The piecer did unbelievable fussy cutting and piecing and so it made it even more fun to quilt.   
     

  17. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from Gail O in Tula Pink Butterfly Quilt   
    Hi everyone...I'm trying not be as addicted to this forum as I once was but I really love this quilt that I recently quilted and wanted to share.  I have really stepped up and challenged myself to go more into custom work.  I have a blog post that is pic heavy with more details of my quilting, but here is a snapshot.   This is The Butterfly Quilt by Tula Pink.  The piecer did unbelievable fussy cutting and piecing and so it made it even more fun to quilt.   
     

  18. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from Debi in Tula Pink Butterfly Quilt   
    Hi everyone...I'm trying not be as addicted to this forum as I once was but I really love this quilt that I recently quilted and wanted to share.  I have really stepped up and challenged myself to go more into custom work.  I have a blog post that is pic heavy with more details of my quilting, but here is a snapshot.   This is The Butterfly Quilt by Tula Pink.  The piecer did unbelievable fussy cutting and piecing and so it made it even more fun to quilt.   
     

  19. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from gkazee in Tula Pink Butterfly Quilt   
    Hi everyone...I'm trying not be as addicted to this forum as I once was but I really love this quilt that I recently quilted and wanted to share.  I have really stepped up and challenged myself to go more into custom work.  I have a blog post that is pic heavy with more details of my quilting, but here is a snapshot.   This is The Butterfly Quilt by Tula Pink.  The piecer did unbelievable fussy cutting and piecing and so it made it even more fun to quilt.   
     

  20. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from Oma in Tula Pink Butterfly Quilt   
    Hi everyone...I'm trying not be as addicted to this forum as I once was but I really love this quilt that I recently quilted and wanted to share.  I have really stepped up and challenged myself to go more into custom work.  I have a blog post that is pic heavy with more details of my quilting, but here is a snapshot.   This is The Butterfly Quilt by Tula Pink.  The piecer did unbelievable fussy cutting and piecing and so it made it even more fun to quilt.   
     

  21. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from GMALKB in Tula Pink Butterfly Quilt   
    Hi everyone...I'm trying not be as addicted to this forum as I once was but I really love this quilt that I recently quilted and wanted to share.  I have really stepped up and challenged myself to go more into custom work.  I have a blog post that is pic heavy with more details of my quilting, but here is a snapshot.   This is The Butterfly Quilt by Tula Pink.  The piecer did unbelievable fussy cutting and piecing and so it made it even more fun to quilt.   
     

  22. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from CrazyAboutQuilting in A modern quilt for my bed   
    I call myself the 'cobbler with no shoes'  because I quilt for everyone else except me!  
    So my goal was to make a quilt for our new house,   our new bed....
     
    I wanted calm neutral colours reminding me of sand or pebbles.....I made this quilt  using the pattern "Sweet Garden" from Carolina Patchworks.    I was intending to make the entire king size with this pattern -  and I did.  Then I hated it, so I chopped 2/3s of the pattern off and added white for some neutral breathing space.  
     
    Simple quilting in between the blocks.   
    And then I got carried away in the white.     [
     
     
  23. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from meg in A modern quilt for my bed   
    I call myself the 'cobbler with no shoes'  because I quilt for everyone else except me!  
    So my goal was to make a quilt for our new house,   our new bed....
     
    I wanted calm neutral colours reminding me of sand or pebbles.....I made this quilt  using the pattern "Sweet Garden" from Carolina Patchworks.    I was intending to make the entire king size with this pattern -  and I did.  Then I hated it, so I chopped 2/3s of the pattern off and added white for some neutral breathing space.  
     
    Simple quilting in between the blocks.   
    And then I got carried away in the white.     [
     
     
  24. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from dyequilter in Black bits/dust appearing once in awhile   
    About once a session in the last while I have noticed a little chunk (when I say little - it is like a grain of sand or smaller, and has a few friends of dust particle size) of dust/carbon/charcoal stuff that lands on my quilt top right near where my needle is.     If I touch it,  it crushes, and it is like a charcoal colour -  black but powdery when it gets crushed.   It leaves a mark if I touch it, but it comes out of the fabric if I rub it with my white cloth.   I blow it away.    Any suspicions of where this is coming from?  
     
    This has occurred several times now in the past few weeks.  It may have occurred more often, but lately, I am doing lots of dense and closeup quilting on light fabrics so I am noticing it now.  
     
    My sessions last about 4-6 hours, and it only appears once or so.  But i am curious to where this comes from.   
     
    Any takers?    I want to be sure that there is nothing wrong about to happen to my machine and this may be the warning sign.    
     
     
  25. Upvote
    Sheagatzi got a reaction from JeannieB in Black bits/dust appearing once in awhile   
    oh! yes!  I do!  hmmm.... will check this out. Thanks Nigel!