Darlene Epp

Dealer
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  1. Like
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Gail O in Ruler Mate for Lucey   
    I wish APQS would create a base like the Ruler Mate, since Donita isn't consistent with customer service. I think they still sell the Hartley Base, but it just doesn't fit as well. I have a Ruler Mate on both of my Millenniums and they are never removed. 
  2. Upvote
    Darlene Epp reacted to zeke in ATTENTION: ZEKE   
    Hey Darlene.   I have to go get a Zip drive later before work and I'll send you off a few updates.   Personally, I prefer the 5.071.  It still has the hot keys when the last update, 5.57.07, does not.  Send me your address on a personal message and I'll get it out to you asap.   Zeke.  
    That's roxie my shepherd.  I thought you might enjoy her cute face.  

  3. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Mary Beth in TrilliumHouseDesigns.com Closing down CLEARANCE!   
    Thank you Mary Beth. I needed that today! Bless you.
  4. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from LCQuilts in NQR-Fibromyalgia and Rx Cymbalta   
    Day 4 of withdrawal. I'm happy to report that I haven't needed to take another pill since noon yesterday. This evening I was feeling "almost" normal, except for some shortness of breath and the ongoing "hot flashes". I even walked my pup around the block tonight. (It's a small block!) Considering that I could hardly get out of bed for the last few weeks, that feels like a huge accomplishment!
    I see my Dr. tomorrow so it will be interesting to hear what he has to say. I've done more reading online, and found a lot of people that have had significant pain relief with Cymbalta, but as one lady said, it should never be given to someone who is NOT depressed! Many also felt that the side effects far outweighed the benefits and that over the counter pain meds were just as effective. I feel that most of the time, "less is more".
  5. Upvote
  6. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Parm in Digitizing software for LA quilters?   
    Very good advice Sue. But if you DO decide to venture into digitizing your own designs, you absolutely can't go wrong with Art and Stitch. The training and support are second to none! Check out the training videos on the website. That will give you a glimpse into what the software can do. There is also a very comprehensive manual which takes you step by step through all the functions, and as other quilters discover new ways to use the software, addendums are added to the manual. Also, webinars which you can attend online.
  7. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from JeannieB in Digitizing software for LA quilters?   
    Very good advice Sue. But if you DO decide to venture into digitizing your own designs, you absolutely can't go wrong with Art and Stitch. The training and support are second to none! Check out the training videos on the website. That will give you a glimpse into what the software can do. There is also a very comprehensive manual which takes you step by step through all the functions, and as other quilters discover new ways to use the software, addendums are added to the manual. Also, webinars which you can attend online.
  8. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from quiltyourown in 2005 APQS Liberty For Sale   
    Yes, the Liberty has the same amazing stitch regulator as the Millennium. It's a great machine! Wish I still had mine.
  9. Upvote
    Darlene Epp reacted to speedsew99 in 2012 Millennium with new Bliss system for sale   
    The Millennium is sold. The new owner picked her up yesterday. I am sure she will have hours of quality quilting with the machine. 
  10. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from delld in 2011 APQS Millenium Head and 14 foot Bliss Table for sale   
    Warranties are not transferable, but these are such well built machines, the lack of warranty wouldn't worry me one little bit. APQS will always be there to service or help you over the phone. Phone help is free and you would seldom, if ever, need anything else.
  11. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from marquetta in Quilt Glide - how often do you use   
    I use it for SID work and going around appliqué. Love it!
  12. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in Quilt Glide - how often do you use   
    I use it for SID work and going around appliqué. Love it!
  13. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from HeidiP in NQR-Fibromyalgia and Rx Cymbalta   
    Thank you all so much for your responses and prayers. They mean a lot! I'm on day 3 of the weaning process and not enjoying it one bit. I'm taking one capsule 2 hours earlier every day until I can get back to the original time of 10 am. I feel so much better after just 20 minutes that I'm actually able to get a few things done and put a complete sentence together when speaking. (You have no idea how long it takes me to type these notes and then go over and over them, correcting grammar and spelling!)
    Heidi M: If your MIL is nicer to you than she was before taking Cymbalta, I'm very thankful! Yes, keep her on it! LOL
    Heidi P: I'm so sorry you've had to go through this with your dear Mom! I believe that many of the problems with the elderly that are in Care Homes is the over medication of them. It's just easier to keep them doped up. So sad.
    Laura:Thank you for the info on the oils. I so completely believe in "alternate" medicine. Reflexology is helping my knee more than anything else! It really is amazing what she can do.
  14. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Brenni in Milsoft for softening batiks   
    Hi K. I've quilted quite a few JN quilts over the last 3 years. Most were for a certified JN teacher and some of her students. I use only Superior Bottom Line for all the SID work. On my own Summer Solstice quilt, I used Superior Kimono Silk in several different colors. I LOVE it! When I want the quilting to show more I use a contrasting color and sometimes Rheingold Poly in the metallic colors. I've also used Aurifil 40 and 50 weight. I almost always use So Fine or Bottom Line in the bobbin and ask my customers to wash the quilt backing twice if they want to use a batik.
  15. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in NQR-Fibromyalgia and Rx Cymbalta   
    Thank you all so much for your responses and prayers. They mean a lot! I'm on day 3 of the weaning process and not enjoying it one bit. I'm taking one capsule 2 hours earlier every day until I can get back to the original time of 10 am. I feel so much better after just 20 minutes that I'm actually able to get a few things done and put a complete sentence together when speaking. (You have no idea how long it takes me to type these notes and then go over and over them, correcting grammar and spelling!)
    Heidi M: If your MIL is nicer to you than she was before taking Cymbalta, I'm very thankful! Yes, keep her on it! LOL
    Heidi P: I'm so sorry you've had to go through this with your dear Mom! I believe that many of the problems with the elderly that are in Care Homes is the over medication of them. It's just easier to keep them doped up. So sad.
    Laura:Thank you for the info on the oils. I so completely believe in "alternate" medicine. Reflexology is helping my knee more than anything else! It really is amazing what she can do.
  16. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from K. Szymaszek in Milsoft for softening batiks   
    Hi K. I've quilted quite a few JN quilts over the last 3 years. Most were for a certified JN teacher and some of her students. I use only Superior Bottom Line for all the SID work. On my own Summer Solstice quilt, I used Superior Kimono Silk in several different colors. I LOVE it! When I want the quilting to show more I use a contrasting color and sometimes Rheingold Poly in the metallic colors. I've also used Aurifil 40 and 50 weight. I almost always use So Fine or Bottom Line in the bobbin and ask my customers to wash the quilt backing twice if they want to use a batik.
  17. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from CattyWampus in NQR-Fibromyalgia and Rx Cymbalta   
    If a Dr. Tries to give you a Rx for Cymbalta, run as fast as you can in the other direction!
    The supposed relief from this med is FAR worse than the FM Syndrome. Coming off of
    It is even worse!!!
    Fair warning! Read what the side effects are and also research the withdrawal symptoms.
  18. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from gardenslug in Milsoft for softening batiks   
    Hi K. I've quilted quite a few JN quilts over the last 3 years. Most were for a certified JN teacher and some of her students. I use only Superior Bottom Line for all the SID work. On my own Summer Solstice quilt, I used Superior Kimono Silk in several different colors. I LOVE it! When I want the quilting to show more I use a contrasting color and sometimes Rheingold Poly in the metallic colors. I've also used Aurifil 40 and 50 weight. I almost always use So Fine or Bottom Line in the bobbin and ask my customers to wash the quilt backing twice if they want to use a batik.
  19. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from ffq-lar in What happens when...? a thought   
    I just tell people that if I let them use the machine, my insurance policy won't cover any damage they do to it and that they would be responsible for any parts and repairs. "Take a class & follow my instructions, or keep your hands off my babies!"
  20. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from dbams in Darlene Epps Pocket guild books   
    You can find them here!
    http://www.trilliumhousedesigns.com/shop/category/freehand-books/

  21. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in Darlene Epps Pocket guild books   
    You can find them here!
    http://www.trilliumhousedesigns.com/shop/category/freehand-books/

  22. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Bekah in Texas Hold'em question   
    Hi Meg,
     
    BOTH sides of the backing are attached to the zippers on the leaders. Otherwise, what would you do when you got to the end of the quilt? I guess if you had a lot of extra backing you could just use the magnets, but that doesn't happen often.
     
    What I mean is; attach the backing as described. Baste on the batting and then lay the top onto both layers and baste down at the top edge. Now, loosen the backing roller so there is NO STRETCH on the backing fabric. It doesn't need to be floppy, just smooth with no stretch on the fibres. (BTW, "fibre" is not misspelled if you're Canadian! ) Now, baste down the sides, THEN add a bit of tension to all 3 layers at once.
  23. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Bekah in Texas Hold'em question   
    When I first started in 1997, there was no such thing as a "float". We pinned the backing to the "front" backing roller, then pinned the top to the "front" top roller. Then the batting was fed between the rollers and then ALL 3 layers were pulled TOGETHER and pinned to the "takeup" roller. Yup! Awkward and time consuming.
     
    The very first customer quilt I got was made out of old jeans, with thick polyester batting, AND a striped sheet for the backing! As tho' that wasn't bad enough, the customer wanted me to leave 2" all around so she could turn the sheet to the front and use it for the binding!  On that very first quilt, I had no choice but to do what I now call a "partial float". The backing are batting was pinned to the takeup roller, and the top of the topper was pinned 2" down from where the backing and batting were pinned. Several years later, it was common to "Partial Float" like this.
     
    Then came channel locks and stitch regulators! Heaven on earth for longarmers!!! The lock was just a knob that was tightened down on the rail, but it worked for horizontal lines and that's what we used to make sure the batting was basted down to the backing in a perfectly straight line.
    Then the topper was laid along that line and sewn down, with further stitching being added down the sides as the quilt was advanced.
    This is what we term a "Partial Float", because the topper is only attached to the roller at the bottom end.
    (BTW, I ONLY use zippers to attach my backing to the canvas leader, so no more pin jabs or snagged T-Shirts!)
     
    The "Full Float" came next. (I think we got both smarter and lazier!) After the topper is basted down to the backing and batting at the "top" end, the rest of the quilt is allowed to "float". That is, it's not attached to any roller, but simply lays free between the backing and top rollers. This works, but it's still difficult to get access to the batting and makes it harder to keep the quilt straight and deal with fullness "at the source". I did it this way for about a year but wasn't completely happy with the results.
     
    Then a brilliant APQS Dealer in Texas by the name of Connie Keller, took off the top roller and devised a partial roller, which APQS now manufactures and calls the Texas Hold'em ($49.95). When you remove the "top" roller, you can "full float" your quilts, have complete access to the batting, and easily spot where the problems are in the quilt top. It also makes it a whole lot easier to pull up your drafting stool to do some "frog stitching" because you have a perfectly flat surface to work on. YES, I'm very good at frog stitching! The longer you do it, the better you get! LOL
     
    The latest brilliant idea came from someone who uses Harbor Freight, strong 18" magnetic bars, to hold the top & batting down to the "backing" roller, or "belly bar". This allows you to make sure seam lines are kept straight along the length of the rollers, and again, to deal with any extra fullness "at the source", instead of it getting pushed down to the bottom of the quilt. Usually, just a bit of steam with shrink extra fullness into submission.
     
    The next idea I got while I was at Sharon Schamber's studio for 3 days in April. THIS one makes SO much sense I don't know why I never thought of it before!
     
    One of the biggest problems we have as longarmers, is how much tension to put on the backing and top when we advance. It really doesn't matter how careful you are, the tensions are NOT going to be the same on all 3 layers if you tension them individually. If you're using polyester batting, it has a built in memory, and it WILL try to go back to it's original size and shape once it is no longer under tension. Then you end up with a quilt that "buckles" and you can't figure why!
     
    Here's the trick: Treat all three layers as tho' you were "hooping" them for an embroidery machine (your longarm). Before you baste down the sides, take ALL tension off the backing, so the batting and top are laying smoothly on top of the backing, also with no tension. Now baste down the sides, THEN pull ALL 3 layers taut at once! (Don't over do it!) You can now add your side tension clamps and voila, you have a large embroidery hoop! Since I've been doing this, I've had very little extra fullness to deal with when I get to the bottom, and no pleats at the sides on the backing.
     
    I've also started "side tensioning" my quilts with canvas leaders (also Sharon Schamber) that are pinned the full length between the rollers (AFTER basting down the sides!) This leader is then clamped around the inserted doweling at the other end, which holds the whole quilting space firm and taut. I do a LOT of custom quilting, lots of SID etc. and this side tensioning system keeps everything from moving, even when doing diagonal ruler work in the border.
     
    I use my CompuQuitlers for intricate designs, and also do a lot of freehand fillers and ruler work. Keeping the quilting space stable is really important when doing computerized designs. I also leave my Ruler Mate base on all the time. This gives me a place to put my hands so I can "manipulate" the fabric when needed.
     
    Hope that helps. Wish I'd known it all 16 years ago, but I guess I'm a slow learner!
  24. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Bonnie in Ok in Texas Hold'em question   
    When I first started in 1997, there was no such thing as a "float". We pinned the backing to the "front" backing roller, then pinned the top to the "front" top roller. Then the batting was fed between the rollers and then ALL 3 layers were pulled TOGETHER and pinned to the "takeup" roller. Yup! Awkward and time consuming.
     
    The very first customer quilt I got was made out of old jeans, with thick polyester batting, AND a striped sheet for the backing! As tho' that wasn't bad enough, the customer wanted me to leave 2" all around so she could turn the sheet to the front and use it for the binding!  On that very first quilt, I had no choice but to do what I now call a "partial float". The backing are batting was pinned to the takeup roller, and the top of the topper was pinned 2" down from where the backing and batting were pinned. Several years later, it was common to "Partial Float" like this.
     
    Then came channel locks and stitch regulators! Heaven on earth for longarmers!!! The lock was just a knob that was tightened down on the rail, but it worked for horizontal lines and that's what we used to make sure the batting was basted down to the backing in a perfectly straight line.
    Then the topper was laid along that line and sewn down, with further stitching being added down the sides as the quilt was advanced.
    This is what we term a "Partial Float", because the topper is only attached to the roller at the bottom end.
    (BTW, I ONLY use zippers to attach my backing to the canvas leader, so no more pin jabs or snagged T-Shirts!)
     
    The "Full Float" came next. (I think we got both smarter and lazier!) After the topper is basted down to the backing and batting at the "top" end, the rest of the quilt is allowed to "float". That is, it's not attached to any roller, but simply lays free between the backing and top rollers. This works, but it's still difficult to get access to the batting and makes it harder to keep the quilt straight and deal with fullness "at the source". I did it this way for about a year but wasn't completely happy with the results.
     
    Then a brilliant APQS Dealer in Texas by the name of Connie Keller, took off the top roller and devised a partial roller, which APQS now manufactures and calls the Texas Hold'em ($49.95). When you remove the "top" roller, you can "full float" your quilts, have complete access to the batting, and easily spot where the problems are in the quilt top. It also makes it a whole lot easier to pull up your drafting stool to do some "frog stitching" because you have a perfectly flat surface to work on. YES, I'm very good at frog stitching! The longer you do it, the better you get! LOL
     
    The latest brilliant idea came from someone who uses Harbor Freight, strong 18" magnetic bars, to hold the top & batting down to the "backing" roller, or "belly bar". This allows you to make sure seam lines are kept straight along the length of the rollers, and again, to deal with any extra fullness "at the source", instead of it getting pushed down to the bottom of the quilt. Usually, just a bit of steam with shrink extra fullness into submission.
     
    The next idea I got while I was at Sharon Schamber's studio for 3 days in April. THIS one makes SO much sense I don't know why I never thought of it before!
     
    One of the biggest problems we have as longarmers, is how much tension to put on the backing and top when we advance. It really doesn't matter how careful you are, the tensions are NOT going to be the same on all 3 layers if you tension them individually. If you're using polyester batting, it has a built in memory, and it WILL try to go back to it's original size and shape once it is no longer under tension. Then you end up with a quilt that "buckles" and you can't figure why!
     
    Here's the trick: Treat all three layers as tho' you were "hooping" them for an embroidery machine (your longarm). Before you baste down the sides, take ALL tension off the backing, so the batting and top are laying smoothly on top of the backing, also with no tension. Now baste down the sides, THEN pull ALL 3 layers taut at once! (Don't over do it!) You can now add your side tension clamps and voila, you have a large embroidery hoop! Since I've been doing this, I've had very little extra fullness to deal with when I get to the bottom, and no pleats at the sides on the backing.
     
    I've also started "side tensioning" my quilts with canvas leaders (also Sharon Schamber) that are pinned the full length between the rollers (AFTER basting down the sides!) This leader is then clamped around the inserted doweling at the other end, which holds the whole quilting space firm and taut. I do a LOT of custom quilting, lots of SID etc. and this side tensioning system keeps everything from moving, even when doing diagonal ruler work in the border.
     
    I use my CompuQuitlers for intricate designs, and also do a lot of freehand fillers and ruler work. Keeping the quilting space stable is really important when doing computerized designs. I also leave my Ruler Mate base on all the time. This gives me a place to put my hands so I can "manipulate" the fabric when needed.
     
    Hope that helps. Wish I'd known it all 16 years ago, but I guess I'm a slow learner!
  25. Upvote
    Darlene Epp got a reaction from Ann Wight in Texas Hold'em question   
    When I first started in 1997, there was no such thing as a "float". We pinned the backing to the "front" backing roller, then pinned the top to the "front" top roller. Then the batting was fed between the rollers and then ALL 3 layers were pulled TOGETHER and pinned to the "takeup" roller. Yup! Awkward and time consuming.
     
    The very first customer quilt I got was made out of old jeans, with thick polyester batting, AND a striped sheet for the backing! As tho' that wasn't bad enough, the customer wanted me to leave 2" all around so she could turn the sheet to the front and use it for the binding!  On that very first quilt, I had no choice but to do what I now call a "partial float". The backing are batting was pinned to the takeup roller, and the top of the topper was pinned 2" down from where the backing and batting were pinned. Several years later, it was common to "Partial Float" like this.
     
    Then came channel locks and stitch regulators! Heaven on earth for longarmers!!! The lock was just a knob that was tightened down on the rail, but it worked for horizontal lines and that's what we used to make sure the batting was basted down to the backing in a perfectly straight line.
    Then the topper was laid along that line and sewn down, with further stitching being added down the sides as the quilt was advanced.
    This is what we term a "Partial Float", because the topper is only attached to the roller at the bottom end.
    (BTW, I ONLY use zippers to attach my backing to the canvas leader, so no more pin jabs or snagged T-Shirts!)
     
    The "Full Float" came next. (I think we got both smarter and lazier!) After the topper is basted down to the backing and batting at the "top" end, the rest of the quilt is allowed to "float". That is, it's not attached to any roller, but simply lays free between the backing and top rollers. This works, but it's still difficult to get access to the batting and makes it harder to keep the quilt straight and deal with fullness "at the source". I did it this way for about a year but wasn't completely happy with the results.
     
    Then a brilliant APQS Dealer in Texas by the name of Connie Keller, took off the top roller and devised a partial roller, which APQS now manufactures and calls the Texas Hold'em ($49.95). When you remove the "top" roller, you can "full float" your quilts, have complete access to the batting, and easily spot where the problems are in the quilt top. It also makes it a whole lot easier to pull up your drafting stool to do some "frog stitching" because you have a perfectly flat surface to work on. YES, I'm very good at frog stitching! The longer you do it, the better you get! LOL
     
    The latest brilliant idea came from someone who uses Harbor Freight, strong 18" magnetic bars, to hold the top & batting down to the "backing" roller, or "belly bar". This allows you to make sure seam lines are kept straight along the length of the rollers, and again, to deal with any extra fullness "at the source", instead of it getting pushed down to the bottom of the quilt. Usually, just a bit of steam with shrink extra fullness into submission.
     
    The next idea I got while I was at Sharon Schamber's studio for 3 days in April. THIS one makes SO much sense I don't know why I never thought of it before!
     
    One of the biggest problems we have as longarmers, is how much tension to put on the backing and top when we advance. It really doesn't matter how careful you are, the tensions are NOT going to be the same on all 3 layers if you tension them individually. If you're using polyester batting, it has a built in memory, and it WILL try to go back to it's original size and shape once it is no longer under tension. Then you end up with a quilt that "buckles" and you can't figure why!
     
    Here's the trick: Treat all three layers as tho' you were "hooping" them for an embroidery machine (your longarm). Before you baste down the sides, take ALL tension off the backing, so the batting and top are laying smoothly on top of the backing, also with no tension. Now baste down the sides, THEN pull ALL 3 layers taut at once! (Don't over do it!) You can now add your side tension clamps and voila, you have a large embroidery hoop! Since I've been doing this, I've had very little extra fullness to deal with when I get to the bottom, and no pleats at the sides on the backing.
     
    I've also started "side tensioning" my quilts with canvas leaders (also Sharon Schamber) that are pinned the full length between the rollers (AFTER basting down the sides!) This leader is then clamped around the inserted doweling at the other end, which holds the whole quilting space firm and taut. I do a LOT of custom quilting, lots of SID etc. and this side tensioning system keeps everything from moving, even when doing diagonal ruler work in the border.
     
    I use my CompuQuitlers for intricate designs, and also do a lot of freehand fillers and ruler work. Keeping the quilting space stable is really important when doing computerized designs. I also leave my Ruler Mate base on all the time. This gives me a place to put my hands so I can "manipulate" the fabric when needed.
     
    Hope that helps. Wish I'd known it all 16 years ago, but I guess I'm a slow learner!