sammi357

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  1. Like
    sammi357 got a reaction from NHDeb in Tell me about your travel machine   
    I love machines.  One might say they are a bit of an addiction!  Almost all of my machines are pre-loved and from either yard sales or 2nd hand shops.  (I bring them home, clean, oil and stitch them in... and dh says, "That will keep you occupied for the weekend!") (People have actually left machines on my patio....) 
    They are all wonderful! They all have their little quirks and personalities!  I want to save them  all!... unfortunately, I'm running out of floor space! 
    I have a Bernina 1530 for my stay at home, best machine. It doesn't go anywhere, b/c I'm afraid of jostling the machine and messing up the computer bits. (It's probably made of stronger stuff, but I am just unwilling to take a chance with it, after a qgf had her machine in her car, slammed on the brakes and it went tumbling! yeek!)  Seat belts!
    The runner up is the Bernina 1001..it's a mechanical machine, and a real work horse...that machine sews through anything I've thrown at it without hesitation.  LOVE!  Just have a JA's roller bag for it.  It's a mid-weight model, has a built-in handle to make it easier to lift in and out of the tote. It goes to retreats and sewing night on a regular basis. It's only drawback, the silly thing does not have a button-hole stitch which I could really use for machine applique.  'ninas can be pricey. (just looked: The new model of this one is the 1008, their website lists it at ...whew...1699!)  I got the 1001 at an estate sale.   (I just weighed it...21 lbs)  While dh (dear hubby) got me the 1530 which is set up in the sewing room and I use it all the time; the 1001 is really my go-to travelling machine. I don't ever worry that there's something I will need to do but won't be able to sew, because there's always some cute thing, like a new bag or wallet pattern or something someone will bring to retreat...!
    Also have an old green Bernina Record...that thing EATS denim and canvas like it's butter. I've replaced Carhardtt jacket zippers, but, it's chunky, not exactly easy to move about.  Found a portable, folding sewing machine table at a parking lot sale, and... It FITS!  Green beastie is going to be set up in this table soon to re-do camper seat covers, and I have no doubt it will chug through them with no hesitation. 
    My DM (dear mom) just blessed me with her best friend's Featherweight. I have given it a spa treatment (thanks to the Singer Featherweight Shop tune-up kit..what a kit!  Comes with all kinds of great stuff to give your FW some tlc!  (Not affiliated, but really impressed with kit and service!  Be sure to read their article on FW grease comparisons.)  I'm in the process of fixing the case; it was badly damaged. As in, the bottom fell off!  There are a ton of patterns now, for totes that wrap the cases! fun!  There are a lot of places that have FW's that are more reasonable now, the prices used to be wild. 
    Singer has a ton of little electric machines...they're really indestructible. Oh, and not to forget, there's the little Singer Genie...so MOD!  
     I also love a little Kenmore Rose...it's a green, light weight portable and has a case that has roses embossed on the outside. If you can find one, they are light weight, more wallet-friendly than a Featherweight, and has a zig-zag.  15 lbs, self-contained accessory tray, etc.
    Older Kenmore straight-stitch/ziz-zag machines...those are not light, but worth their weight in gold. I have a blue one that isn't easy to lug around, but it sure sews great. 
    Pfaff...they have a couple of lighter weight portables... the Grasshopper, of course, but not to overlook the Supermatic, which does a lot of different stitches with cams. 
     Elna 1010 that is a great little portable machine. I have sewn quilting fabric on it, but haven't done anything like jeans mending or a big bag on it yet. It has lots of stitches.  I was going to re-home it, but discovered that it has all these little snap-on feet, and friend gave me a 1/4 circle piecing foot and it fits this baby, so ....now I have to keep her!  lol!  Oh, that foot is great, btw, if anyone is doing a drunkard's path or anything that has a circle shape...NO pinning!  (Curve Master)
    Too many machines, so little sewing time!  (omg...no, I haven't actually counted lately...?!)
    Maybe we should start a pool? lol!
     
     
    sammi
     
     
  2. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from T Row Studio in Kaffe tote bags   
    Those are great bags!  Wow. 
    I think you should make a tutorial and a pattern and market them.  
    I  *LOVE* anything 'technique-y' and if you've come up with something new or a new spin on an old idea, there are lots of sites where you can sell patterns and make yourself a little 'egg money'.
     
    s
  3. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from Hawaii in Kaffe tote bags   
    Those are great bags!  Wow. 
    I think you should make a tutorial and a pattern and market them.  
    I  *LOVE* anything 'technique-y' and if you've come up with something new or a new spin on an old idea, there are lots of sites where you can sell patterns and make yourself a little 'egg money'.
     
    s
  4. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from quiltmonkey in oil sludge on quilt   
    Good Grief! 
     
    I've been in a bit of a sewing slump for a while, haven't felt like sewing, and haven't done much but a little bit of mending/hemming for hubby.  
     
    So, I finally felt like getting in the sewing room. Found out a friend is expecting, so got out a "Newton" baby panel that's been aging for a while and did some simple square in a square style stuff with the complimentary fabric. Had enough fabric for two little tops. They're baby sized, so it went really fast.  Nice! Instant gratification! (and, omg...Newton is SO cute...od on sweetness!) 
     
    Chucked them right onto the la, try to quilt it while the sewing bug is still around, and DANG if the machine didn't blob oil on the edge of the quilt...the SECOND quilt...!  
     
    I try to test stitch a little on the edge before starting, just to make sure the machine doesn't do something goofy, and it didn't, til almost the end of the second top.  Dang thing!  
     
    I remembered chatter here about what to do, so I grabbed powder and liberally dosed it, but I had to get the binding on before I could do anything about washing it. 
     
    I hand washed just the edge with a little bit of Dawn, and then put it on the line to dry.  There's a little bit of dark area in the batting...but I figure that they're meant to be baby quilts and used well, so it'll probably get washed soon enough.  It's mostly not visible unless one knows where it's at.  
     
    Fortunately, it wasn't someone's prize possession! But, I knew what to do because I read it here, first!  
     
    (Edited because I got his name wrong.)
  5. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from Primitive1 in oil sludge on quilt   
    Good Grief! 
     
    I've been in a bit of a sewing slump for a while, haven't felt like sewing, and haven't done much but a little bit of mending/hemming for hubby.  
     
    So, I finally felt like getting in the sewing room. Found out a friend is expecting, so got out a "Newton" baby panel that's been aging for a while and did some simple square in a square style stuff with the complimentary fabric. Had enough fabric for two little tops. They're baby sized, so it went really fast.  Nice! Instant gratification! (and, omg...Newton is SO cute...od on sweetness!) 
     
    Chucked them right onto the la, try to quilt it while the sewing bug is still around, and DANG if the machine didn't blob oil on the edge of the quilt...the SECOND quilt...!  
     
    I try to test stitch a little on the edge before starting, just to make sure the machine doesn't do something goofy, and it didn't, til almost the end of the second top.  Dang thing!  
     
    I remembered chatter here about what to do, so I grabbed powder and liberally dosed it, but I had to get the binding on before I could do anything about washing it. 
     
    I hand washed just the edge with a little bit of Dawn, and then put it on the line to dry.  There's a little bit of dark area in the batting...but I figure that they're meant to be baby quilts and used well, so it'll probably get washed soon enough.  It's mostly not visible unless one knows where it's at.  
     
    Fortunately, it wasn't someone's prize possession! But, I knew what to do because I read it here, first!  
     
    (Edited because I got his name wrong.)
  6. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from Wyonut2run in oil sludge on quilt   
    Good Grief! 
     
    I've been in a bit of a sewing slump for a while, haven't felt like sewing, and haven't done much but a little bit of mending/hemming for hubby.  
     
    So, I finally felt like getting in the sewing room. Found out a friend is expecting, so got out a "Newton" baby panel that's been aging for a while and did some simple square in a square style stuff with the complimentary fabric. Had enough fabric for two little tops. They're baby sized, so it went really fast.  Nice! Instant gratification! (and, omg...Newton is SO cute...od on sweetness!) 
     
    Chucked them right onto the la, try to quilt it while the sewing bug is still around, and DANG if the machine didn't blob oil on the edge of the quilt...the SECOND quilt...!  
     
    I try to test stitch a little on the edge before starting, just to make sure the machine doesn't do something goofy, and it didn't, til almost the end of the second top.  Dang thing!  
     
    I remembered chatter here about what to do, so I grabbed powder and liberally dosed it, but I had to get the binding on before I could do anything about washing it. 
     
    I hand washed just the edge with a little bit of Dawn, and then put it on the line to dry.  There's a little bit of dark area in the batting...but I figure that they're meant to be baby quilts and used well, so it'll probably get washed soon enough.  It's mostly not visible unless one knows where it's at.  
     
    Fortunately, it wasn't someone's prize possession! But, I knew what to do because I read it here, first!  
     
    (Edited because I got his name wrong.)
  7. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from Zora in oil sludge on quilt   
    Good Grief! 
     
    I've been in a bit of a sewing slump for a while, haven't felt like sewing, and haven't done much but a little bit of mending/hemming for hubby.  
     
    So, I finally felt like getting in the sewing room. Found out a friend is expecting, so got out a "Newton" baby panel that's been aging for a while and did some simple square in a square style stuff with the complimentary fabric. Had enough fabric for two little tops. They're baby sized, so it went really fast.  Nice! Instant gratification! (and, omg...Newton is SO cute...od on sweetness!) 
     
    Chucked them right onto the la, try to quilt it while the sewing bug is still around, and DANG if the machine didn't blob oil on the edge of the quilt...the SECOND quilt...!  
     
    I try to test stitch a little on the edge before starting, just to make sure the machine doesn't do something goofy, and it didn't, til almost the end of the second top.  Dang thing!  
     
    I remembered chatter here about what to do, so I grabbed powder and liberally dosed it, but I had to get the binding on before I could do anything about washing it. 
     
    I hand washed just the edge with a little bit of Dawn, and then put it on the line to dry.  There's a little bit of dark area in the batting...but I figure that they're meant to be baby quilts and used well, so it'll probably get washed soon enough.  It's mostly not visible unless one knows where it's at.  
     
    Fortunately, it wasn't someone's prize possession! But, I knew what to do because I read it here, first!  
     
    (Edited because I got his name wrong.)
  8. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in oil sludge on quilt   
    Good Grief! 
     
    I've been in a bit of a sewing slump for a while, haven't felt like sewing, and haven't done much but a little bit of mending/hemming for hubby.  
     
    So, I finally felt like getting in the sewing room. Found out a friend is expecting, so got out a "Newton" baby panel that's been aging for a while and did some simple square in a square style stuff with the complimentary fabric. Had enough fabric for two little tops. They're baby sized, so it went really fast.  Nice! Instant gratification! (and, omg...Newton is SO cute...od on sweetness!) 
     
    Chucked them right onto the la, try to quilt it while the sewing bug is still around, and DANG if the machine didn't blob oil on the edge of the quilt...the SECOND quilt...!  
     
    I try to test stitch a little on the edge before starting, just to make sure the machine doesn't do something goofy, and it didn't, til almost the end of the second top.  Dang thing!  
     
    I remembered chatter here about what to do, so I grabbed powder and liberally dosed it, but I had to get the binding on before I could do anything about washing it. 
     
    I hand washed just the edge with a little bit of Dawn, and then put it on the line to dry.  There's a little bit of dark area in the batting...but I figure that they're meant to be baby quilts and used well, so it'll probably get washed soon enough.  It's mostly not visible unless one knows where it's at.  
     
    Fortunately, it wasn't someone's prize possession! But, I knew what to do because I read it here, first!  
     
    (Edited because I got his name wrong.)
  9. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from whitepinesquilter in UPS   
    They have WAREHOUSES to store the stuff that gets lost!  It took me forever, but I finally climbed the food chain on the phone one day, and spoke to their main office, because they lost my husband's PICKUP seat.  They have people to track it down, and someone finally called me back and said, we found your truck seat!  ...except it wasn't ours, it was a different color, make and shape. 
     
    Exactly HOW does one lose a truck seat?  Let alone, TWO?.......really? 
  10. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from Oma in NQR...took a day off to have fun   
    Hey!  The Washington Post covered the two climbers yesterday.
     
    I had to show the article to hubby and told him that "one of my quilters" had posted a photo of the two climbers that looked like tiny gnats climbing up the wall. He thought I meant you'd posted the link, but I explained that you'd been there and it was your very own photo of the climbers.  
     
    To put it in perspective, they're climbing nearly half a mile...880 yards, almost nine football fields.  
     
    Cool!  Thank you for sharing the pic. 
     
    S
  11. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from dbams in Thread for sewing vinyl together   
    Any possibility that you could reinforce the stitching line so that it's not just vinyl? Perhaps stitch in a bias binding, or even a selvedge/selvage
    edges to give it reinforcement at the seams. (not like we don't have yards of those! lol!)
    I'd do both sides of the seam allowance.  Use the binder clips to hold the layers?  
    And, lengthen your stitch length. The needle's making little perforations, so make them farther apart & less likely to tear. 
     
    s
  12. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from whitepinesquilter in off quilt topic - hanky fabric   
    Thank you!
    I'll look at that site.
     
    As a follow up, I did make several hankies from different stuff out of my stash, with mixed results.  Softness is the key, and absorbency.  The 100% cottons are softer. Anything with a blend is not as absorbent.
     
    Quilting cotton: some got softer than others, and they seem to be washing well.  Some pieces are 'crunchier' than others. The softer ones of these are my favorites so far, because they are fun colors. Some people have commented, especially on the pink 'pigs'...lol!  I'm wanting to find more fun fabrics. Chickens would be fun. Sister-in-law really wanted the 'dancing skeletons' bandana, so I'll have to try to find something to make her one. 
     
    Flannel: was mentioned by some bloggers that had made wipers for kidlets.  They are soft, but kind of fluffy and fuzzy, and not my favorite, though, after washing some, maybe some of the fuzzy will go away, then they might be really soft.  I do find myself grabbing these when I am cleaning my glasses.
     
    Sheeting: a sewing friend bought new sheets which came with four king sized pillow cases. She cut two down to regular size and brought me the pieces. They're some 300 thread count or something, and they are really nice feeling. Still a little stiff yet, but these might soften up nicely. They feel really nice...I really like them, but they're kind of slick.  I've stashed a sheet that is well-aged, soft, and ripped in the middle, so I'll try that when I have time to cut some hankies out.
     
    Handkerchief linen: there were some scraps in my stash of unknown origin, some were marked and some weren't, but they were already cut into squares, presumably, someone was making handkerchiefs.  Those are a little stiff, so hopefully, will soften with washing. One that I tried a mitered corner and a little white-on-white machine embroidery turned out nice, but it's pretty stiff. Feels like wiping your nose on the dresser scarf! lol!  They do seem to be softening a little more. It was an excellent lesson on mitering. And, I learned that machine embr. does not look the same on both sides. 
     
    Already softened bandanas are still our first choice, hubby's and mine, but they tend to be really bulky in my pocket. I don't really want to walk around with a bulging wad in my hip pocket! lol!  Though, I do always have a 'dana with me in my coat or bag, always have.   I always had them for hair, tying around jeans for a belt, covering ears, riding motorcycles, covering face or neck from dust/sun. They're just all-around handy.  I'm going to watch for the parking lot sale at our local farm and ranch, and when they go on sale, I'm going to buy a few in pretty colors for myself. We usually stock up hubby there, and he likes the darker colors. And, yes, they are just about the best when they are worn to shreds! lol! 
     
    And, last but not least, a lady at quilt guild brought ladies hankies for the 'free' table. I nabbed them! 
     
    All of the hankies I made were serged with the rolled hem feature, and I just squared the corners off:
    The ladies at the serger store showed us this:
     Serge onto the fabric, down the side, at the end, take two stitches past the end, roll the needles out of the fabric, lift the foot, tug the fabric gently to the rear to pull the thread of the two stitches off the loopers, then turn to the next side, place back under the foot, adjust & roll the needles back onto the corner, drop the presser foot, and continue.  At the last side, instead of turning, serge to the end,  roll needles out again, lift the presser foot, gently loosen the needle thread by pulling it slightly, then flip the hankie over, replace under the foot, and stitch a few stitches back the way you came. It locks the stitches. Then, you can serge off the fabric edge and cut the threads, seal them, or leave a thread tail to hide the ends.
     
    Since these are for everyday use, I didn't 1/4 turn many of them. I did do a few that way, for bandanas.  It does take longer, but does make a nice finish. There's a tiny hem finish for fine fabrics in one of the sewing magazines, but I haven't tried it yet.
     
    The sizes came mostly as dictated by the scraps that I used, so they do vary a lot, but I'm finding that the really small ones aren't quite as useful as the medium ones, medium being somewhat smaller than a bandana, but bigger than a tissue.
     
    It also might be fun to try a variegated thread in the serger or machine embroidery.
     
    Trying to remember to bring a hanky has been my biggest learning curve!  I'm so used to tissues that sometimes I forget, and I don't always have my handbag with me.
     
    Thanks again for the input.
     
    Sammi
  13. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from maggienoella in Help-need opinion/options for yucky quilt job-Update   
    Is the 'yukky' factor because you don't LIKE the design?  If you don't like the design, don't find it pleasing to YOU personally, doesn't mean that the quilting is bad. 
     
    We see quilting and piecing so up close while things are in progress that sometimes it's hard to step back and see the big picture.
     
    Unsewing bits because the machine stitch isn't good is one thing, but frogging perfectly fine hand-guided work because you're not a computer is another!  
     
    I think the sample photo looks fine.  Free hand is not computer generated...it has a human, hands-on element that is what it is supposed to be.  wowies happen.
     
    dittos everyone, it's fine, smile, give it to her, take the check and breathe a sigh of relief. 
  14. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from Peggy (SewAsylum) in ruler storage?   
    Love those organizers. 
    Trouble is, I have very little wall space. At present, am using one of the mail sorter-type things...though, it's a 'pretty' one made of wire with a daisy design rather than the office industrial look. Fortunately, I don't have that many rulers and things to store. It also holds the French curve and etc, too.
    Scissors and rotary cutters, etc, are in a little Singer themed holder, it resembles a cardboard 6-pack holder. The front has three slots, the back is just one. If they have a home, usually I can keep things pretty well organized.
     
    Love the repurposed dish rack idea!
  15. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from LisaC in Buying a serger   
    Tell them,
     
    DON'T CHEAP OUT. 
     
    Cheap tools will always bite you on the
     
    This is one of those instances where the $$ spent up front for having a dealer to consult and a quality machine will save them headaches in the long run.  
     
    Dittos on buying better quality, used, than cheap quality, new. 
     
    Dh and I have just been having this conversation about a tool he wants.  Top of the line is what his 'guru' suggested, but, yes, there is a less $$ alternative.  I asked, "You know the answer. Get the good ones, you'll never regret it."  We have remodeled two houses, and we have learned, pretty  much the hard way, that cheap isn't always the way to go. It always seems to cost more in the long run, if not in the expense of replacing the tools, certainly in the frustration level. 
     
    That said, I have three sergers in the sewing room as we speak:  
     
    The first, dh bought as a surprise for me when we first got married.  (16 yrs) A basic model Bernina, it is a real work horse. I've never had any issues with this machine. Dealer in town, came with classes, which were really helpful, I learned a lot. No bells and whistles, does have differential feed, no air threading, but I learned how to thread it just fine. This machine will run til the cows come home. I do a lot of jeans on it...I always have to take things in use the serger to finish the edges. Just basic service, and haven't so much as had to replace the blades. 
     
    The second is a Bernina Fun Lock that I just found recently at one of the second-hand stores in town...talk about being in the the right place at the right time.  I threaded it and it sews just fine. I've used it for some simple projects just to test it out, and haven't had any trouble with it.  I am debating keeping this one, because so many people I know are looking for one, but, there's also the convenience of having a serger for dark thread and one for light thread.  No re-threading for a quick project. 
     
    The third is a Simplicity Easy Lock. It was a yard-sale bargain. Again, an instance of being in the right place at the right time.  It's not a bad little machine, and would probably do everything a beginner would want, but in a side by side comparison, it is very easy to hear the difference in quality between the machines....The motor on the Bernina just sounds more powerful and runs smoother, where the Simplicity one doesn't 'sound' as powerful and makes a lot more sewing noise.  It clatters a lot, noisy little beastie.  (Wish I could make a video for you, but I don't have the 'right tool for the job!' lol) It would probably do a decent job for most projects, but It doesn't have any adjustments, etc.  It is what it is, where the Bernina has stitch adjustments and the differential feed. This machine may be re-homed soon.  I was using it as my other light/dark thread machine. 
     
    The other issue I have with their argument is, WHO is posting the reviews? Is it someone that's been sewing for 40 years, or is it a newbie that doesn't have any room for comparison, took the thing out of the box and is simply happy it works?  another question is, if it's a brand that does have a dealer nearby?  One can still pay for service. 
     
    And, last but not least, my story with my brand new serger... my huge dog knocked a full glass of iced-tea over with his tail, all over the serger!  Who ya gonna call?  The dealer's ph # is in the phone book, called them at home, First he told me not to panic, then how to clean/dry out the machine, and then said they'd look at it the next day if I could bring it in. Ya just don't get that kind of service on the internet!  
     
    Hope this helps.  
    sammi
  16. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from quiltmonkey in getting there   
    We have a pic like that of hubby's head... his looks more like Homer Simpson!  (the dr did not find it the least bit amusing when I pointed that out, but dh and I did! lol!) 
     
    Wishing you a speedy recovery! 
     
    S
  17. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from chickenscratch in My mother's day gifts from my 21 year old son   
    Good parenting!  
     
    wink!
     
     
    s
  18. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from irene rose in pattern ~ HUGE quilting tote?   
    Lady at a quilt retreat had a HUGE quilting tote...it is free-standing, had Hawaiian applique on the sides, and is as large or larger than a regular sewing machine tote. It held her mat and rulers, fabric, etc and had a ton of pockets on the inside. It was deep and wide, not just a flat mat & ruler type bag. 
     
    She said it was a pattern, but she didn't have the name of the designer or any other information, other than she'd taken a class on the Hawaiian applique technique, then hand-quilted the sides of the tote bag. It had stiff stuff in the sides. 
     
    anyone seen it?  I've googled all morning but am coming up with nothing. 
     
    It had this kind of  shape:
     
    http://www.shabbyfabrics.com/Id-Be-Quiltin-P6097.aspx
     
    but was way bigger. 
     
    I could probably wing it, but I'm wondering how they assembled the tote with a rigid bottom. 
     
     
    thanks!
     
    s
  19. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from Sharonarooni in found a neat studio idea   
    http://www.bhg.com/decorating/storage/sewing-quilting/perfect-sewing-room/#page=6
    Found this cool idea for a cutting table while surfing sewing room ideas today. I love these chrome units...I have them filled with tubs of fabric.
    (Hi, I'm Sammi, I'm a hoarder...! lol! Just fabric, tho! lol!)
    I think the same idea could be used for those that have been asking about ironing surfaces, a cut-to fit board with an ironing surface on it could be fitted on the posts of the unit.
    They're reasonable and available at Costco, and the whole shelving unit could be used as two halves.
  20. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from whitepinesquilter in fast, quilt-y gift   
    If you need a fast, quilt-y gift, making a portable design wall / block book:
    The book can be used to keep track of pieces for complicated blocks, samplers, etc, and make transporting the pieces easy because they don't move around.
    Cut "pages" from an inexpensive, flannel-backed tablecloth and stack the pages 'flannel to slick', then stitch them together along one side. The pages should be large enough so that a 12" block, in pieces, will fit on the pages. The back page can be slick to the outside.
    The layers are surprisingly easy to stitch through, I used a longer stitch than usual. A matching 'binding' can be cut from fabric and folded around the back. (That said, my machine is a sturdy little piglet. I haven't fed it anything yet that it didn't sew right through. I mend hubby's overalls on it.)
    I used a large summer tablecloth on clearance from Wal-mart & adjusted the pages to get the most pages out of the dimension of the cloth. (sorry, I don't recall exactly what size it was, and I threw the wrapper away.) It may have been an outdoor one, for a picnic table, because it was pretty large and it wasn't 'finished' around the edges. It had square corners. Some of the regular ones have rounded corners. I ended up with 28-13-1/2" pages with some scraps. One could 'fancy' it up with a fabric cover, ties and closures.
    s
  21. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from kathyb in fast, quilt-y gift   
    If you need a fast, quilt-y gift, making a portable design wall / block book:
    The book can be used to keep track of pieces for complicated blocks, samplers, etc, and make transporting the pieces easy because they don't move around.
    Cut "pages" from an inexpensive, flannel-backed tablecloth and stack the pages 'flannel to slick', then stitch them together along one side. The pages should be large enough so that a 12" block, in pieces, will fit on the pages. The back page can be slick to the outside.
    The layers are surprisingly easy to stitch through, I used a longer stitch than usual. A matching 'binding' can be cut from fabric and folded around the back. (That said, my machine is a sturdy little piglet. I haven't fed it anything yet that it didn't sew right through. I mend hubby's overalls on it.)
    I used a large summer tablecloth on clearance from Wal-mart & adjusted the pages to get the most pages out of the dimension of the cloth. (sorry, I don't recall exactly what size it was, and I threw the wrapper away.) It may have been an outdoor one, for a picnic table, because it was pretty large and it wasn't 'finished' around the edges. It had square corners. Some of the regular ones have rounded corners. I ended up with 28-13-1/2" pages with some scraps. One could 'fancy' it up with a fabric cover, ties and closures.
    s
  22. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from DoryJM in fast, quilt-y gift   
    If you need a fast, quilt-y gift, making a portable design wall / block book:
    The book can be used to keep track of pieces for complicated blocks, samplers, etc, and make transporting the pieces easy because they don't move around.
    Cut "pages" from an inexpensive, flannel-backed tablecloth and stack the pages 'flannel to slick', then stitch them together along one side. The pages should be large enough so that a 12" block, in pieces, will fit on the pages. The back page can be slick to the outside.
    The layers are surprisingly easy to stitch through, I used a longer stitch than usual. A matching 'binding' can be cut from fabric and folded around the back. (That said, my machine is a sturdy little piglet. I haven't fed it anything yet that it didn't sew right through. I mend hubby's overalls on it.)
    I used a large summer tablecloth on clearance from Wal-mart & adjusted the pages to get the most pages out of the dimension of the cloth. (sorry, I don't recall exactly what size it was, and I threw the wrapper away.) It may have been an outdoor one, for a picnic table, because it was pretty large and it wasn't 'finished' around the edges. It had square corners. Some of the regular ones have rounded corners. I ended up with 28-13-1/2" pages with some scraps. One could 'fancy' it up with a fabric cover, ties and closures.
    s
  23. Upvote
    sammi357 got a reaction from Teresa Couch in EASY STREET MYSTERY   
    Saved the instructions, but I haven't started yet. In the recent fabric haul, there is a good black and white, like she showed, so I may use some of this 'new' stash to pull fabrics and try it. There was a grey, too, and I need to look and see if it's enough.
    I did do another one of their mysteries: it was a fun pattern, and I did like it when it was done, and though it's waiting for borders, I did complete the top. (ie, it's not sitting half-done in a tub!)
    One other mystery class, I did the block, sewed the sashings on, got the top completed, and hated, yes HATED, the sashing. The block was striking, but the sashing color and print just 'smooshed' the block and it disappeared. So, there it sat. for at least a couple of years. Finally, I admitted I hated the sashing, and I unsewed it all. Got a new color, put it all back together and LOVE it now.
    Doing a mystery helps overcome part of that control issue for me, because I tend to be obsessive about choosing colors. If I pull it all from stash, it also helps use up some of those fabrics. Most of the time, I completely immobilize myself with the possibilities.... there are too many to choose, so I don't start!
    Sammi