RunningThreads

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  1. Like
    RunningThreads got a reaction from dbams in Machine drags with ruler base on   
    Jamie
    Look to see if the drag is happening when the head is near the leveler bar.  Can you get a finger up to the first knuckle between the base and the bar with a quilt on the machine?  If not you probably  should raise the bar.  If you have a round leg table it is very easy to do, undo the bolt holding bar to the heim joint on the left side (should only be hand tight) and remove the bar, loosen the jam nut on the heim joint and unscrew the joint a couple of turns and tighten the jam nut back up.  Do the same for the heim joint on the right side exactly the same number of turns  then reinstall the roller and you should be good to go.  If you have the quilt too loose it could be dragging on the base as well.  I believe the table would have left the factory to work with the Hartley base but if you have added a Circle Lord or upgraded the wheels the machine height may have changed.
    Nigel
  2. Upvote
    RunningThreads reacted to judyday in needle position   
    NonI,  I live in Wortham. Not really far from you. I have a George sit down machine but I think the mechanics are very much alike. I would be glad to come help you. 
    I will pm you my phone number
  3. Upvote
    RunningThreads reacted to quiltmonkey in My Dilemma   
    OK I will be brutally honest and say this: There are lots of great quilting machine brands out there. But, if I were you, I'd strongly suggest you spend a little extra money and get the quality product that will last forever, is easy to use, isn't fussy, is sturdy and built to work, a product that is world renown for its quality and service and many many years of excellent reputation. So, that said, there are lots of great machines out there. But you know what? You are guaranteed to be happy with an APQS product. There are some things you shouldn't skimp. Get the best you can afford, even used. I know many people who have bought APQS and are so very very happy with the choice they made. 
  4. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from quilterkp in My Dilemma   
    Welcome Gail
    In my opinion I think the better deal would be a used professional quality machine like an APQS.  If you find you don’t want to quilt after a couple of years the used APQS machine will be easier to sell and will depreciate less.  The factory has wonderful support and encourages  you to service the machine yourself.  They will send detailed instructions with excellent pictures should you ever have to make repairs.  Let the BC dealers and Sparrow Studioz in Edmonton know what you are looking for as they may hear of someone wanting to sell or upgrade to a newer machine.  If you are patient a deal will come along.  There is one for sale right now in Surrey but let it sit for a while, I don’t think it will sell for anywhere near the current asking price.
     
    Nigel
  5. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from quiltmonkey in My Dilemma   
    Welcome Gail
    In my opinion I think the better deal would be a used professional quality machine like an APQS.  If you find you don’t want to quilt after a couple of years the used APQS machine will be easier to sell and will depreciate less.  The factory has wonderful support and encourages  you to service the machine yourself.  They will send detailed instructions with excellent pictures should you ever have to make repairs.  Let the BC dealers and Sparrow Studioz in Edmonton know what you are looking for as they may hear of someone wanting to sell or upgrade to a newer machine.  If you are patient a deal will come along.  There is one for sale right now in Surrey but let it sit for a while, I don’t think it will sell for anywhere near the current asking price.
     
    Nigel
  6. Like
    RunningThreads got a reaction from NHDeb in My Dilemma   
    Welcome Gail
    In my opinion I think the better deal would be a used professional quality machine like an APQS.  If you find you don’t want to quilt after a couple of years the used APQS machine will be easier to sell and will depreciate less.  The factory has wonderful support and encourages  you to service the machine yourself.  They will send detailed instructions with excellent pictures should you ever have to make repairs.  Let the BC dealers and Sparrow Studioz in Edmonton know what you are looking for as they may hear of someone wanting to sell or upgrade to a newer machine.  If you are patient a deal will come along.  There is one for sale right now in Surrey but let it sit for a while, I don’t think it will sell for anywhere near the current asking price.
     
    Nigel
  7. Like
    RunningThreads got a reaction from Quilta93 in Vicky   
    Glad you got it figured out. Make blowing out the carbon dust and checking the brush length a regular maintenance item.  I believe the brushes are half inch long when new and replace when they get to three eights.  Check about every six months should be sufficient.
     
    Nigel
  8. Like
    RunningThreads reacted to harcathy in Baby gift   
    Made this little quilt for baby shower gift for a coworker. I’m new to ruler work and am pleased with the result. Just needs binding 

  9. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from Vicky Silkie in Vicky   
    Glad you got it figured out. Make blowing out the carbon dust and checking the brush length a regular maintenance item.  I believe the brushes are half inch long when new and replace when they get to three eights.  Check about every six months should be sufficient.
     
    Nigel
  10. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from quilterkp in Carolyn   
    Hi Carolyn
    It was back in August and here is a link to the discussion.  Cagey got a more up to date list of recommended power supplies.
    Nigel
    http://forum.apqs.com/topic/41689-surge-protectors/?tab=comments#comment-542179
     
  11. Like
    RunningThreads got a reaction from dbams in Superior Bottom Line   
    I’m confused as well.  Are you talking about the thread breaking on the bobbin winder or the Millie?  I read it as a problem with the bobbin Winder.
     
    Nigel
  12. Like
    RunningThreads got a reaction from dbams in User Guide   
    Steve
    Go to the APQS website at the top of this page.  From there you will find a Support tab and in there you will find common service questions and service videos most of the stuff that is in the manual will be answered there.  That should get you started until you find a manual.  Is there anything specific you need help with?  Ask here and someone will help.  Call the factory and ask about a manual I’m pretty sure they can help you their support is great.
    Nigel
     
  13. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from quilterkp in batting costs   
    We do it just like Linda charge by the linear inch and don’t undercut the Local Quilt Store.  If the quilt is less than 48 wide we will usually cut the batting in half and charge accordingly and use the other piece on another customer’s baby quilt.
    Nigel
  14. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from InesR in Top Thread Repeatedly Shredding and Breaking   
    The more info you can give us the better for someone to help you.  How old is the machine or how many quilts have been done on it?  Have you run this combination before successfully or is this the first time?  Are you having the problem stitch regulated or manual,  computerized or hand guided?
    Now both of our machines are old so the first thing we check when top thread shreds and breaks is the pig tail guides.  Grab the thread above and below each guide and drag it around the inside of the guide and see if you can feel it catch where it might be wearing a groove into the guide.  If you feel the groove loosen the screw and rotate the guide so it is upside down and tighten the screw back up.  That will last for months and you can order some new guides.  (Get extras as that is the most common wear item).  The check spring can also get a groove worn into it but that usually takes a number of years of good use.
     
    Let us know how you make out.
    Nigel
  15. Like
    RunningThreads got a reaction from dbams in Top Thread Repeatedly Shredding and Breaking   
    The more info you can give us the better for someone to help you.  How old is the machine or how many quilts have been done on it?  Have you run this combination before successfully or is this the first time?  Are you having the problem stitch regulated or manual,  computerized or hand guided?
    Now both of our machines are old so the first thing we check when top thread shreds and breaks is the pig tail guides.  Grab the thread above and below each guide and drag it around the inside of the guide and see if you can feel it catch where it might be wearing a groove into the guide.  If you feel the groove loosen the screw and rotate the guide so it is upside down and tighten the screw back up.  That will last for months and you can order some new guides.  (Get extras as that is the most common wear item).  The check spring can also get a groove worn into it but that usually takes a number of years of good use.
     
    Let us know how you make out.
    Nigel
  16. Like
    RunningThreads got a reaction from Quilta93 in Check Spring Not Moving   
    Melissa
     Before you take anything apart.  Push the spring down with your finger, does it snap back?  If so there is nothing wrong there.  I reread your original post and you mentioned adjusting tension, if you have the tension backed way off that spring won’t deflect much if at all when pulling the thread through it.  Try tightening about half a turn and see what happens.
    Fyi the purpose of that spring is to take the slack out of the thread when the needle is out of the fabric so the thread doesn’t get tangled around the needle.  It actually doesn’t have much if any effect on the tension.
    Nigel
  17. Like
    RunningThreads got a reaction from MaryQuiltsTx in Check Spring Not Moving   
    Melissa
     Before you take anything apart.  Push the spring down with your finger, does it snap back?  If so there is nothing wrong there.  I reread your original post and you mentioned adjusting tension, if you have the tension backed way off that spring won’t deflect much if at all when pulling the thread through it.  Try tightening about half a turn and see what happens.
    Fyi the purpose of that spring is to take the slack out of the thread when the needle is out of the fabric so the thread doesn’t get tangled around the needle.  It actually doesn’t have much if any effect on the tension.
    Nigel
  18. Like
    RunningThreads got a reaction from Cagey in Check Spring Not Moving   
    Melissa
     Before you take anything apart.  Push the spring down with your finger, does it snap back?  If so there is nothing wrong there.  I reread your original post and you mentioned adjusting tension, if you have the tension backed way off that spring won’t deflect much if at all when pulling the thread through it.  Try tightening about half a turn and see what happens.
    Fyi the purpose of that spring is to take the slack out of the thread when the needle is out of the fabric so the thread doesn’t get tangled around the needle.  It actually doesn’t have much if any effect on the tension.
    Nigel
  19. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from Gail O in encoder wheels   
    My broken wire was at one of the pins in the Molex connector.  I managed to solder the wire to the pin because I didn't have any new pins at the time.  I guess I should repair it properly, I think it's only been about six or seven years.
  20. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from dbams in encoder wheels   
    My broken wire was at one of the pins in the Molex connector.  I managed to solder the wire to the pin because I didn't have any new pins at the time.  I guess I should repair it properly, I think it's only been about six or seven years.
  21. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from quilterkp in M bobbins   
    I would think preferably the solid side against the backlash spring.  I have two winders that rotate opposite to each other so I've had the holes in and out and both seem to work.  My steel bobbins don't have the notch for the drive spring so they don't work on the Turbo Winder.  If you have bobbins with the notch they should be fine on the Turbo Winder.
     
    Nigel
  22. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from dbams in Needle Down Adjust Screw   
    Hi Sue 
    Here you go.  To find it again go to APQS main page click support and then select service videos and there is lots of stuff to see there.
    Nigel
    https://www.apqs.com/needle-adjustment-fluorescent-fight-machines-video/
  23. Upvote
    RunningThreads got a reaction from AnnP in Rollers won't stay tight on Lenni   
    Liz
    Now that you know how to adjust the brake get some blue loctite loosen the bolt apply one or two drops of loctite on the threads and tighten back up.  You brake will not come loose again.
     
    Nigel
  24. Upvote
    RunningThreads reacted to Cagey in Surge Protectors   
    Here is a link to the different types of UPS systems (line interactive verses double conversion);  http://www.qpsolutions.net/2015/06/line-interactive-vs-double-conversion-ups-which-ones-best/  It explains the two systems better than I did.
    Cagey
  25. Upvote
    RunningThreads reacted to Cagey in Surge Protectors   
    This is from APQS.  I cannot attach the actual .pdf file, so here is my best rendition cutting and pasting the images.  Edited to include images from pdf file.
    Cagey
     
     
     ELECTRICITY AND YOUR APQS MACHINE 
    With more and more electronics being used in quilting machines, electricity supply is more important than ever! If the incoming power fluctuates, the circuit board will starve certain functions in order to keep the boards powered, and the motor can be affected as well. 
    The printout below shows the incoming power here at the APQS factory. Notice how much the power dips towards the end of the printout – we are on the same power grid as Pella Windows, and at the time the power dipped in this printout, Pella had a large motor blow up. You can see how much we were affected by this, and it wasn’t even in our building!

     Even different types of power supplies can vary the incoming voltage to your home – solar, hydroelectric, wind – these types of power vary greatly, and the circuitry on your machine will suffer the consequences. 
    The next printout is from a customer of ours in Colorado. He was having problems with his needle positioner acting up at times. He asked for this printout of the power supply to his home over a 4 day period, and was greatly surprised at the varying voltages and amperages that was powering his home.

    Purchasing a battery back-up or UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) for your APQS machine is a great ”insurance policy”. APQS has done extensive testing on battery back-ups and found one type that is capable of running both the motor and supplying the needed power for the circuit boards as well. 
    Most battery back-ups or UPS’s output is a square wave. This wave type will not keep both the electric motor and the circuit boards running in a voltage drop situation. It will keep the circuit boards powered, so it is fine for other electronic equipment.

    The UPS systems that are recommended for our machines are able to output a pure sine wave, which is capable of keeping the electric motor running and keep the circuit board powered at the same time.

    With these UPS devices, you are able to even unplug the cord from the wall outlet, and run the machine for a period of time – which can be very handy during power outages!! 
    Technical information from the UPS devices we tested is on the next page. There are several companies on the web that sell these specific devices, and prices vary from site to site. The models listed on the next page show a variety of options; however, one is NOT pure sine wave so it is not recommended. The others are Dual Conversion backup systems, which are slightly different than the standard ‘Standby UPS’ battery backup systems. 
    Dual Conversion On-Line UPS is the same as the standby UPS, except that the primary power path is the inverter battery instead of the wall outlet. The incoming power from the wall outlet is stored in the battery, and the battery supplies the power to the machine – this keeps the incoming power consistent, without having the delay that is caused by normal battery backup systems when they ‘kick in’ to supply power. The Dual Conversion On-Line UPS provides nearly ideal electrical output performance.

    Be aware that UPS units can look very similar so it can be easy to select the wrong one. Look for a unit that is a PURE SINE WAVE output. For added advantages, choose one that is DUAL CONVERSION.
    The CyperPower CP1500AVRLCD unit above left does NOT have a pure sine wave output and would not be a good choice. Lower priced units typically are not pure sine wave units. Read the product descriptions carefully before buying.
     
    End APQS pure sine wave pdf.
     
    I spoke with SYCOM, and they told me that they do not have any Dual Conversion / Double Conversion units that would meet the price points above.  Theirs would be more in the $1000 range.  They did review all three items above, and suggested the Tripp Lite as  having the best power factor.  That is to say that how much power does the unit use to provide electricity to the quilting machine.  The Tripp Lite is 0.8, the Minuteman is 0.7, and the CyberPower is 0.6.  To clarify what I just wrote, the Trip Lite uses about 20% of the power to provide the pure sine wave coming into the unit.  The Minuteman would use 30% of the power to produce the same sine wave, and the CyberPower would use approximately 40% of the incoming power to produce the pure sine wave output.  Their units run in the 0.9+ power factor range, which increases the cost.
    They did go on that by using the device you would hypothetically extend the life of anything plugged into the device by 50%.  This is because unlike with most surge protectors with battery backup, there is a lag time for a surge or lag to be experienced before the unit switches to battery power.  With a pure sine wave generator, the item plugged into the device is somewhat always being run off the battery.  The unit is constantly soothing out the highs and lows of the electricity coming out of the wall plug, and providing a very pure power source to the output plug and the quilting machine/anything plugged into the unit. The battery backup run time is to allow you time to shut the item plugged in, without damaging the device.