Jump to content

juliagraves

Dealer
  • Posts

    515
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Upvote
    juliagraves got a reaction from quilterkp in Is Longarming Still a Viable Biz Option   
    I have had a profitable longarm business for 10 years.  There are many benefits to having a business - a lot of expenses that you would have had any way due to quilting being your hobby, will now become business expenses, offsetting your income. I agree that there is lots of business out there, especially for people that do quality work with a reasonable turn around.  Good luck!
  2. Upvote
    juliagraves got a reaction from donna Sterling in 2008 Lenni for sale in Washington DC area   
    2008 Lenni with 10 foot table for sale - only $6,500!
    Located in Lusby MD, 1 hour south of Washington D.C.
     
    I'm a dealer and this 2008 Lenni is my second machine, not used very much.  I had it primarily to demo to potential customers, as I mainly use my Millie.  It is very well maintained by a factory-trained mechanic.  I am downsizing and letting Lenni go... A new Lenni is $11,400, so $6,500 represents a big savings - get APQS quality at a very reasonable price!
     
    Includes:  10' table, stitch regulator, Hartley base extender for using rulers, 2 rulers, 2 pantographs, package of needles, package of 10 bobbins, thread, zippers attached to leaders (from Quilting Connection), a quilt set of zippers (for the quilt), reference materials and the CD.  I will also include the APQS Beginner Class/training at my studio in Lusby Maryland. 
     
    Prefer that you pick up the machine versus shipping.  Buyer is responsible for pick-up.  Cash or certified bank check only.
     
    Lusby MD is a convenient pick-up location for anyone in Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, West Virginia, New Jersey, New York...
     
    Lenni features:
     
    Throat size— 20 “ x 8”
    Weight 34 lbs (15 kg)
    APQS stitch regulator
    Laser light stylus— mounts from the front or back
    Quiet enclosed DC motor
    Variable Needle Speed
    Needle Up/ Needle Down
    Single stitch button
    LED lighting
     
     Please email me at juliagraves82@gmail.com with any questions. Photos available upon request.
    Julia Graves
    juliagraves82@gmail.com
    410-326-3043
  3. Upvote
    juliagraves got a reaction from whitepinesquilter in How do I load a quilt that will not have binding?   
    I have quilted any number of odd things for customers, including an envelope quilt as described.  I explained that there was a danger of tucks, and that I couldn't quilt up to the edges because I needed to have a place to attach the quilt to the frame and clamps, and the customer was good with it.  I wrote all this on the intake form and the customer signed it, acknowledging the risk of tucks and that there wouldn't be quilting within an inch of the edge of the quilt.
     
    I then pin based the quilt sandwich about every 5-8 inches.  I pinned strips of fabric (about 4" wide) to all the sides and then attached the fabric strip to the leaders and clamps.  I did a very large meander, taking out the pins as I approached them, and easing in any fullness on the top or backing.  I checked the back often to see if I had any problems.  I did end up with a few small tucks, but they weren't very noticeable.
     
    So - it's not the best situation, but not impossible.  I find that setting expectations with the customer up front really helps.  \
     
    I've also added additional quilting to an already quilted and bound quilt.  I did the same trick of pinning fabric strips to the sides so I had something to pin to the leaders and for the clamps.  It worked just fine.
     
    Julia
  4. Upvote
    juliagraves got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in 2008 Lenni for sale in Washington DC area   
    this machine has been sold, thanks to this forum!
  5. Upvote
    juliagraves got a reaction from WandaGerdes in How do I load a quilt that will not have binding?   
    I have quilted any number of odd things for customers, including an envelope quilt as described.  I explained that there was a danger of tucks, and that I couldn't quilt up to the edges because I needed to have a place to attach the quilt to the frame and clamps, and the customer was good with it.  I wrote all this on the intake form and the customer signed it, acknowledging the risk of tucks and that there wouldn't be quilting within an inch of the edge of the quilt.
     
    I then pin based the quilt sandwich about every 5-8 inches.  I pinned strips of fabric (about 4" wide) to all the sides and then attached the fabric strip to the leaders and clamps.  I did a very large meander, taking out the pins as I approached them, and easing in any fullness on the top or backing.  I checked the back often to see if I had any problems.  I did end up with a few small tucks, but they weren't very noticeable.
     
    So - it's not the best situation, but not impossible.  I find that setting expectations with the customer up front really helps.  \
     
    I've also added additional quilting to an already quilted and bound quilt.  I did the same trick of pinning fabric strips to the sides so I had something to pin to the leaders and for the clamps.  It worked just fine.
     
    Julia
  6. Upvote
    juliagraves got a reaction from meg in Tension problems.   
    if it breaks consistently at a certain place, check for burrs - little rough spots along your hook assembly or on the hole in the needle plate.  I take a pin and slowly go along the edges, looking for anywhere the thread can catch.  You don't have to break a needle to create a burr - just a temporary flex of the needle will do it.  Check your pigtails as well.  If you find a burr, you need to buff it out with something like emory cord.  For the pigtails, you can turn them 180 and a different part of the pigtail will be exposed rather than the part with the burr.
     
    Julia
×
×
  • Create New...