jimerickson

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  1. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from quiltmonkey in How To Load a King Quilt on a Lenni with a 12' frame?   
    No.  What you're experiencing is normal.  As you roll up the quilt on the take-up roller it takes up space in the "harp".  Each pass you make will  shorten your  "stitching field".  Just plan accordingly.  If you're stitching a panto, make sure that it is no deeper than the smallest stitching field will be.  Probably 2 or 2 1/2 inches less.  Good luck.  Jim
  2. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Cheeky Cognoscenti in Tension Trouble Only in Certain Directions -- What Should I Tweak?   
    Turning you needle will help with skipped stitches, but not with tension issues.  If you're using equal ruler tension in all directions, then I think it's a matter of tension adjustment.  The direction you are sewing affects stitch tension by drag on the  top thread. e.g. more tension in some directions, less tension in others.  With very light tension the direction tension variables become magnified.  My suggestion:  Tighten your bobbin tension to 200 on you TOWA, then tighten your top tension enough to balance your stitches.  With this tighter stitch, the direction tension differences will be a much smaller percent of total tension, and stitch balance will be easier to achieve.  Jim   
  3. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from LinneaMarie in What to do about pokies!   
    LinneaMarie:  Shana's right about the fabric, but I'd like to add that the 80/20 batting you're using isn't the best when it comes to bearding as well.  I prefer to use a poly or more preferably, wool because they don't beard.  I don't use 80/20 much anymore unless the customer wants cotton batting.  Jim
  4. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from LittleHipkitty in APQS Convertible Table help   
    I've never seen one of these before. 
    I think you've probably pretty well figured out how to use it.  I might consider using a rod to roll the quilt up on as it's completed and stored in the "tray.  I think the grey tubing that's laying in the front black channel, is probably intended to hold the quilt "sandwich" in place as you quilt.  Get yourself some inexpensive materials, and try it out.  As you work, the function of the various pieces will probably become apparent.  Good luck.  Jim 
  5. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from tootsquilts in Barbara   
    The M bobbin holds almost twice the thread that the L bobbin holds.  Jim
  6. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from quiltmonkey in tension mystery issue   
    When I get loops, it is usually because there is something wrong with the upper tension.  Try tightening and see if the problem goes away.  Jim  PS:  because Tut is cotton, check your bobbin case for hidden lint.
  7. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Poor quality backing fabric?   
    I dislike Moda fabrics for exactly that reason. Rather than being dyed, it appears that the fabric is "painted" and the back side is very light colored.  When you sew on it, some of the threads roll over showing the light color of the "wrong" side.  The "pokies" aren't really the batting showing through but a problem with the under lying fabric.  Jim 
  8. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Gail O in Poor quality backing fabric?   
    I dislike Moda fabrics for exactly that reason. Rather than being dyed, it appears that the fabric is "painted" and the back side is very light colored.  When you sew on it, some of the threads roll over showing the light color of the "wrong" side.  The "pokies" aren't really the batting showing through but a problem with the under lying fabric.  Jim 
  9. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from sdrunge123@gmail.com in 10 ft rods for a used longarm set I just purchased (APQS wooden table/Ultimate II machine).   
    Just a suggestion:  Take all 3 rollers to the welder/fabricator at the same time.  Have him cut off the end without the gear, and then re-weld the shaft caps after the rollers have been shortened.  Tell him you want them to all be shortened exactly the same amount.  After the rollers have been shortened then take to shortening the actual table top.  With the rollers in hand it will be easier to get the top cut to the right length.  No chance of measuring errors, or communications mistakes.  Good luck.  Jim
  10. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from InesR in Legacy batting? Wool batting?   
    Sorry, you're right Cagey.  I use Heirloom, buy it by the roll.  The 96" comes in a 30 yd roll, and the 110" comes in a 25 yd roll.  I don't buy the single batts or the small yardage offerings.  Jim 
  11. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from RedDeb in Have I just bought trouble?   
    Deb:  Not really a long arm.  I had a stretched 622.  It was based on Singer 96 industrial machine.  It had a 15 inch throat.  I noticed a while back that the then current 622's were no longer stretched, just 9".  I don't remember what the 633 was.  It wasn't one of KenQuilts real long arms.  KenQuilt went out of business 5 or 6 years ago.  Their "real" longarms were pretty good machines.  I don't understand your question about the location of the needle and foot.  I think they are in the same place you'd expect to find them on almost any other machine.  Jim
  12. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from gkazee in Difference in features between Millie and Freddie   
    Amy:  I have an Ult 2 which of course came without electronic channel locks.  I found the "manual" channel lock to be user unfriendly.  As a result, I built myself a set of electronic channel locks.  I use them all the time.  In fact I was thinking about the channel locks the other day while quilting, and thought "what would I do without my channel locks".  At least at one time, some of the other long arm manufacturers offer the electronic channel locks as an option.  I think the option cost between $800 and $1000, so the extra $1100 APQS wants for the Millie over the Freddie is appropriate.  I personally would buy the Millie just for the channel locks.  Jim
  13. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Gigi59 in Creases in my backing fabric   
    Safety pins work fine.  The one benefit they offer is that they don'e accidentally come out.  Use whatever you like.  The point being that you must stabilize the quilt before you roll.  Jim
  14. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Amy Chaney in Difference in features between Millie and Freddie   
    Amy:  I have an Ult 2 which of course came without electronic channel locks.  I found the "manual" channel lock to be user unfriendly.  As a result, I built myself a set of electronic channel locks.  I use them all the time.  In fact I was thinking about the channel locks the other day while quilting, and thought "what would I do without my channel locks".  At least at one time, some of the other long arm manufacturers offer the electronic channel locks as an option.  I think the option cost between $800 and $1000, so the extra $1100 APQS wants for the Millie over the Freddie is appropriate.  I personally would buy the Millie just for the channel locks.  Jim
  15. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from quiltmonkey in How to Shorten a table   
    Mercedes:  I don't think there has been any actual instructions on how do do it.   What you'd need to do is go to a local welder/fabricator, explain what you want done, and let them do it.  It would involve cutting the rollers to the proper length and re-welding them, cutting the table rails, and the top itself, drilling any new holes necessary to reassemble it.  Not too big a job.  Jim 
  16. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from ORNurse56 in Discovery?   
    ORN:  I think Nolting will install an Intellistitch regulator on a Discovery, if that's what you're trying to get.  They are expensive, the one on my Ult 2 cost me $3200 back in 2011.  If you're just wanting a robotic machine, then if this Discovery has needle positioner, it would be a good candidate.  If on the other hand you want a stitch regulated machine for hand guided quilting, you're probably better off looking for a machine that is already regulated, unless you can buy the Discovery really cheap.  Jim
  17. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in How dense to quilt when there's fullness   
    When I have a quilt with a lot of fullness, I use a high loft batting, and quilt as heavily as necessary to control the fullness.  Jim
  18. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in motor smells   
    Sew:  Did the motor get hot?  If so, you might have the drive belt set too tight.  When you press your finger on the belt, it should move about 1/4 inch.  If it's tighter than that, loosen it a bit, and try sewing again.  Good luck.  Jim
  19. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Apqs ultimate 11   
    Sandy:  If you're missing stitches, it's probably timing. It might be presser foot tension.  If the foot doesn't put some pressure on the quilt sandwich, you could miss stitches as well.
    I think APQS used to have manuals you could buy.  I have a manual that is full of notations to myself, that might confuse other users.  If you can't find one somewhere else, let me know and I'll try and copy mine.  There are 24 pages.  Some of the drawings did not perfectly match my machine, and that can be confusing as well.  I will have to say, the timing photos included in my manual are great.  Jim
  20. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Cascading Quilts in Quilt Path vs. Intelliquilter   
    Maribeth:  I don't have a computerized system, and my experience is limited to nearly a decade of reading posts, but I think the IQ is a better choice.  I believe Quilt Path is a Grace product, and of course Grace makes all sorts of quilting products.  Intelliquilter is made by Kasa Engineering, who make only the Intellistitch stitch regulator, and the Intelliquilter.  A lot narrower focus.
    I've had experience with Kasa since I had two older long arms fitted with the Intellistitch  regulators.  Besides being one of the best stitch regulators on the market, they are very responsive to any problem you might have.  They really do stand behind their product.
    From simply looking at the two systems, the Intellistitch seems to be better engineered.  Their drive motors seem to be a better design choice than the belt drive system of the Quilt Path.  APQS is a great company, so they won't sell you a poor product, so Quilt Path must be good, but if I were buying a full featured robotic system, it would be the Intelliquilter.  It seems like folks with experience with both products prefer the IQ.  I hope my thoughts are helpful.  Jim
  21. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from sewcute in Ult 2 Table Modifications   
    Several of you have asked me to show photos of some of the modifications I've made to "Zelda" and her table.  I've loaded a several pictures, thanks to the specific instructions BossQuilter gave me.  They show the 4 roller rack configuration, the gas spring assisted batting access system, my toggle roller clamp system, the horizontal and vertical channel locks, and the leveling roller set up I built.
     
    These modifications along with the addition of an Intellistitch stitch regulator have made Zelda thoroughly modern.  Hope they are of interest to some of you.  Jim  
  22. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Did not tighten needle enough - now it is stuck   
    MEB:  Don't turn on your machine until you've removed the needle from the hook, and it turns easily by hand.  If you do , you'll just blow the fuses again.  Pull the needle with the pliers and rock the hand wheel back and forth until it comes out, and the machine turns free.  Jim 
  23. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Quilt Path vs. Intelliquilter   
    Maribeth:  I've been quilting for over 10 years now.  Started with a KenQuilt stretched 622. moved to a P17.(a Singer 201 based stretched machine), and then to a Gammill Classic, and a year later added my APQS Ult 2.  I've had the Ult 2 for nearly 9 years.  Having had a couple of "lesser" machines, I really appreciate the design and quality of the Gammill and APQS.  I do the occasional commission quilt as well as most of the quilting for our sewing group, and have probably quilted about 1000 quilts over my quilting "life".
    I'm happy to share some of the insights I've gained as a result of my experience, and hope my thoughts are helpful to the folks here on the forum.  Jim
  24. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from RunningThreads in Quilt Path vs. Intelliquilter   
    Maribeth:  I've been quilting for over 10 years now.  Started with a KenQuilt stretched 622. moved to a P17.(a Singer 201 based stretched machine), and then to a Gammill Classic, and a year later added my APQS Ult 2.  I've had the Ult 2 for nearly 9 years.  Having had a couple of "lesser" machines, I really appreciate the design and quality of the Gammill and APQS.  I do the occasional commission quilt as well as most of the quilting for our sewing group, and have probably quilted about 1000 quilts over my quilting "life".
    I'm happy to share some of the insights I've gained as a result of my experience, and hope my thoughts are helpful to the folks here on the forum.  Jim
  25. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Quilt Path vs. Intelliquilter   
    Maribeth:  I don't have a computerized system, and my experience is limited to nearly a decade of reading posts, but I think the IQ is a better choice.  I believe Quilt Path is a Grace product, and of course Grace makes all sorts of quilting products.  Intelliquilter is made by Kasa Engineering, who make only the Intellistitch stitch regulator, and the Intelliquilter.  A lot narrower focus.
    I've had experience with Kasa since I had two older long arms fitted with the Intellistitch  regulators.  Besides being one of the best stitch regulators on the market, they are very responsive to any problem you might have.  They really do stand behind their product.
    From simply looking at the two systems, the Intellistitch seems to be better engineered.  Their drive motors seem to be a better design choice than the belt drive system of the Quilt Path.  APQS is a great company, so they won't sell you a poor product, so Quilt Path must be good, but if I were buying a full featured robotic system, it would be the Intelliquilter.  It seems like folks with experience with both products prefer the IQ.  I hope my thoughts are helpful.  Jim