jimerickson

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  1. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Sandra Darlington in New Generation Millie   
    I guess I'm just too "stick in the mudish".  I don't get too excited over "new and better".  I try and buy good quality to begin with, and then stick with it.  In fact I still have a Ford F250 I bought new in 1988.  It's a great truck and still serves me well.  I'm comfortable with it, as I'm comfortable with my Ult2.  I've upgraded her with stitch regulator, power lift, electronic channel locks, 2 position laser pointer, after market wheels, and a rebuilt roller rack.  All things I felt were really worth the trouble to buy/build.
     
    I do like the new switch configuration on the Milli.  I only test "drove" a Milli once at the Dallas quilt show, but the multiple buttons on the handle ends confused me.  I'd be more comfortable with the new configuration.  I'm sure I'd have gottern used the the all the buttons on the handlkes if I'd had such a machine.  After using some embroidery machines, I'm not too hot on all the electronic sensors (not just on sewing machines, but on cars as well).  They do neat things, but they are things that misbehave, and sometime fail.  As far as lifetime warrantee's go, the way APQS machines are built, there's
    no need for a lifetime warrantee.  The machines last forever!  I won't be rushing out to buy a replacement machine anytime soon.  Jim
  2. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from pumpkinpatchquilter in NQA Judge unethical? Has anyone heard?   
    If I were the judge, and I'm not a judge, and I recognized one of my quilts, I would not have awarded it a ribbon.  There is enough subjectivity in judging that that kind of decision could be easily defended.  Awarding yourself a ribbon on the other hand, is way harder to defend.
     
    My personal view is that too much stock is placed on quilt show awards.  Now I'm not a quilter who makes his living off my work, so maybe I under value awards.  But I've been to enough quilt shows to know there is no reliable way to determine what quilts will win.  Juging is too subjective.  Quilts that I've loved got no awards, and some, in my opinion, crap quilts got awards.  The award isn't that good a "yard stick".  I tell all my quilting friends to not concern themselves with awards.  If you get one, fine.  Enjoy it, but if you don't, don't feel bad.  The judge just didn't happen to like the kind of work you do.  No reflection on you.  Jim
  3. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from lindasewsit in NQA Judge unethical? Has anyone heard?   
    If I were the judge, and I'm not a judge, and I recognized one of my quilts, I would not have awarded it a ribbon.  There is enough subjectivity in judging that that kind of decision could be easily defended.  Awarding yourself a ribbon on the other hand, is way harder to defend.
     
    My personal view is that too much stock is placed on quilt show awards.  Now I'm not a quilter who makes his living off my work, so maybe I under value awards.  But I've been to enough quilt shows to know there is no reliable way to determine what quilts will win.  Juging is too subjective.  Quilts that I've loved got no awards, and some, in my opinion, crap quilts got awards.  The award isn't that good a "yard stick".  I tell all my quilting friends to not concern themselves with awards.  If you get one, fine.  Enjoy it, but if you don't, don't feel bad.  The judge just didn't happen to like the kind of work you do.  No reflection on you.  Jim
  4. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from LinneaMarie in NQA Judge unethical? Has anyone heard?   
    If I were the judge, and I'm not a judge, and I recognized one of my quilts, I would not have awarded it a ribbon.  There is enough subjectivity in judging that that kind of decision could be easily defended.  Awarding yourself a ribbon on the other hand, is way harder to defend.
     
    My personal view is that too much stock is placed on quilt show awards.  Now I'm not a quilter who makes his living off my work, so maybe I under value awards.  But I've been to enough quilt shows to know there is no reliable way to determine what quilts will win.  Juging is too subjective.  Quilts that I've loved got no awards, and some, in my opinion, crap quilts got awards.  The award isn't that good a "yard stick".  I tell all my quilting friends to not concern themselves with awards.  If you get one, fine.  Enjoy it, but if you don't, don't feel bad.  The judge just didn't happen to like the kind of work you do.  No reflection on you.  Jim
  5. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from LibbyG in For those who quilt for others.   
    I guess because I don't do custom quilting for my customers, I don't remember a lot of quilts I quilted.  If one should show up in a show, I'm as likely to be surprised to see that I quilted it as I am to recognize it.  I do about 2 commission quilts a month, and I've done that for four years now. The custom work I do is for me (not many), my wife, and for friends.  Even some of these I forget - maybe it's just my age. don't have the memory I used to.
     
    When I do see a quilt I quilted in a show. It's fun to look at it, review the design I did, see how well it was stitched, see if my skills have improved since I did it, and think how I'd quilt it today.  I guess some of my commission quilts are technically custom, but that's only because I decided the quilt needed to be quilted with respect for the piecing.
     
    I did recently become "possessive" of a quilt one of my customers pieced.  My grandaughter saw it on my frame and fell in love with it.  I ended up trading three quilting jobs for the quilt, and gave it to my grandaughter for Christmas.  Jim
  6. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from GrandmaLKB in Do you ever get nervous quilting for an important customer?   
    I treat all my customers the same way.  I try a do a good job for everyone.  If I'm not satisfied with my work, I'll redo it.  If I am, and my customer isn't, I'll get a new customer.  Jim
  7. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Sharonarooni in Do you ever get nervous quilting for an important customer?   
    I treat all my customers the same way.  I try a do a good job for everyone.  If I'm not satisfied with my work, I'll redo it.  If I am, and my customer isn't, I'll get a new customer.  Jim
  8. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Matt Sparrow in Hobbs 80/20 vs. Pellon Legacy 80/20 w/scrim   
    I agree with Marci. Sharing of observations/expierences is one of the wonderful aspects of this forum. None of us quilt in exactly the same way, and probably don't even share the same opininon of what constitutes a really great quilt. We use different machines, have different preferences for thread, fabric, batting, tools, and design. A preceived benefit for one quilter might represent a problem to another.
    I've used Pellon Legacy 80/20, Hobbs 80/20, Hobbs Poly, Fairfield Bamboo, and probably a couple of others that I don't remember. I like some better than others. I've had reasons for using what I used, some having nothing to do with the performance of the batting, I dislike any precut, bagged batting. Too many wrinkles to suit me. I try to use batting off the roll. I've taken the batting issue to the point of asking my customers not to provide batting, but rather let me provide it. I know some of the quilters here use bagged batting exclusively. They have their reasons. I won't critize them for that. I just doesn't work for me. To date my batting of choice is Hobbs 80/20. There are things I don't like about it, but on balance, it serves me best. That does not mean it is the best. I probably haven't even tried the "best". The point is that I have my reasons for my preference. Sharing our opinions and observations help us all become better professionals. I like to know what other quilters have experienced when using products that I both use, and don't use. My needs/preferences may be exactly the same as their's, or completely opposite. The shared opinion helps me make decisions.
    Very few members "bash" other's ideas, or products. They have their preference, and probably a pretty good reason for that preference. Sharing expierences helps us all be the quilter we want to be. At least that's my take on it. Jim
  9. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from lkl in Hobbs 80/20 vs. Pellon Legacy 80/20 w/scrim   
    I agree with Marci. Sharing of observations/expierences is one of the wonderful aspects of this forum. None of us quilt in exactly the same way, and probably don't even share the same opininon of what constitutes a really great quilt. We use different machines, have different preferences for thread, fabric, batting, tools, and design. A preceived benefit for one quilter might represent a problem to another.
    I've used Pellon Legacy 80/20, Hobbs 80/20, Hobbs Poly, Fairfield Bamboo, and probably a couple of others that I don't remember. I like some better than others. I've had reasons for using what I used, some having nothing to do with the performance of the batting, I dislike any precut, bagged batting. Too many wrinkles to suit me. I try to use batting off the roll. I've taken the batting issue to the point of asking my customers not to provide batting, but rather let me provide it. I know some of the quilters here use bagged batting exclusively. They have their reasons. I won't critize them for that. I just doesn't work for me. To date my batting of choice is Hobbs 80/20. There are things I don't like about it, but on balance, it serves me best. That does not mean it is the best. I probably haven't even tried the "best". The point is that I have my reasons for my preference. Sharing our opinions and observations help us all become better professionals. I like to know what other quilters have experienced when using products that I both use, and don't use. My needs/preferences may be exactly the same as their's, or completely opposite. The shared opinion helps me make decisions.
    Very few members "bash" other's ideas, or products. They have their preference, and probably a pretty good reason for that preference. Sharing expierences helps us all be the quilter we want to be. At least that's my take on it. Jim
  10. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Sharonarooni in Spiro attachment   
    Virginia: I started to talk about use, but then as I thought about it, I decided that the place to begin is to find a suitable place to store all the pieces. Drawers will probably work OK, but since I didn't have any, and I'm very concerned about the "foot print" of anything in my studio, I chose to hang mine on the wall. I guess any type of hanger would probably work, but I drilled 3/8" noles in my window trim (down the side), angled slightly so the gear would not slide off, cut 3" sections of 3/8" dowel and put the dowels in the holes. I drilled 5 holes, spaced about 4" appart, one each for the 4 gear sets, and one for the crank handle. My window trim is flat and about 4" wide, so this was easy to do, and worked out well. I put a dry wall screw near the edge of the window top trim and hang the reducer gear on it. It hangs so that the center screw assembly points into the window and the gear can lay flat. I would be a little bit worried about throwing that piece into a drawer. Now on to the use.
    The first thing you have to do is master the insertion of the gears. This can be a little tricky, so practice inserting the gears, stitch out a pattern on a practice piece. Examine the pattern and see that it matches the design shown for it. After you feel confident about positioning the QZ and inserting the gears, go on to the advanced appilications. Do some nested patterns. After you feel like you've mastered the "nests", try some ribbon designs. Finally after you feel comfortable with the ribbons, go to the epitrochoids.
    There are so many possibilities, you will probably not use them all in several years. This is just the neatest machine. The design is so good, and the materials used to make it are just top rate, and it will do so many different things. Enjoy. Jim
  11. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Sharonarooni in Spiro attachment   
    Virginia: I guess I should have added that I drilled a small hole (about 3/16" between the clamping knobs of the actual spiro assembly, drove a stout finishing nail into the wall, and hang the assembly on the nail. I have a similar arrangement to hold the QZ unit itself. Everything hangs on the wall, so I always know where it is, and it's out of harms way. Jim
  12. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Matt Sparrow in Hobbs 80/20 vs. Pellon Legacy 80/20 w/scrim   
    Matt: I used Pellon Legacy off the roll quite a bit.and thought it was OK. My supply dried up and I started to use Hobbs, When I first got the Hobbs I notice that the 30 yd roll was larger in circumfrence than the Pellon. (Hobbs apparantly has more loft) I thought the Pellon had a smoother feel when you touched it. Mine did not have scrim, it was simply needle punched. I have notice that Hobbs probably produces a bit less lint. The Hobbs seems to beard a little less than the Pellon. Because of the bearding, I perfer the Hobbs, but I don't dislike Pellon Legacy. Jim
  13. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from harcathy in Turbo Bobbin Winder troubleshooting   
    Anne: I don't have a turbo winder, but I've noticed on my winder that the "O" ring that is fitted to the motor shaft to drive the winder will streach and slip as the winder warms up and runs fast. When it does this, it squeals. To control this, I slow down the winder until it stops slipping. I might be able to correct the problem by replacing the "O" ring, but I can live with it. Maybe your winder is doing the same thing. Watch it (if you can see the drive pully) and see if the "O" ring distorts. If it does, that's the problem. Regards. Jim