jimerickson

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  1. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Cascading Quilts in Quilt Path vs. Intelliquilter   
    Maribeth:  I don't have a computerized system, and my experience is limited to nearly a decade of reading posts, but I think the IQ is a better choice.  I believe Quilt Path is a Grace product, and of course Grace makes all sorts of quilting products.  Intelliquilter is made by Kasa Engineering, who make only the Intellistitch stitch regulator, and the Intelliquilter.  A lot narrower focus.
    I've had experience with Kasa since I had two older long arms fitted with the Intellistitch  regulators.  Besides being one of the best stitch regulators on the market, they are very responsive to any problem you might have.  They really do stand behind their product.
    From simply looking at the two systems, the Intellistitch seems to be better engineered.  Their drive motors seem to be a better design choice than the belt drive system of the Quilt Path.  APQS is a great company, so they won't sell you a poor product, so Quilt Path must be good, but if I were buying a full featured robotic system, it would be the Intelliquilter.  It seems like folks with experience with both products prefer the IQ.  I hope my thoughts are helpful.  Jim
  2. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from penelopefabric in SUPPLIES   
    I've used the Gross Beckert titanium coated needles a lot, and they have performed well for me.  APQS claims they are more prone to breakage, where as the chrome plated ones bend.  In my experience, I have not found that to be the case.
    I no longer use MR needles of any kind.  Two or three years ago, I switched to Schmetz SERV 7 needles, which only come in chrome.  If they were offered in titanium, I'd buy them.  I like the Schmetz because they seem to be stiffer than the MR needles, and don't miss stitches as often.  I would have to say the life of the chrome ones is quite long, so I'm not sure there is any benefit to using titanium coated needles for long arms.  When I was using MR needles, I damaged the tip long before the needles were worn dull.  The damaged tips were mostly caused by deflection and the needle striking the hook assembly.  The Schmetz needles I now use, have pretty much eliminated that problem.  I hardly ever have to change needles now.  Jim
  3. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Vicki Sue in Speed of machine   
    Vicki:  The Ultimate II is a non-regulated machine, so the number of stitches per inch is controlled by the operator.  The slower the machine is moved, the greater the number of stitches per inch.  The faster it is moved, the fewer stitches per inch.  Similarly, the speed control also affects the number of stitches per inch.
    It's been a long time since my Ult2 was non-regulated, so my experience is a way back, but it seems to me that I used to run it at about 7 on a 10 point speed scale.  For a beginner I think starting slow would b e good plan.  Get yourself something to practice on and, and begin.  Start and stop.  Try different speeds.  In a couple of hours you should feel comfortable, and settle in on the speed that suits you.  Good luck.  Jim
  4. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from InesR in Lennie   
    Vicky:  There is ample room in the throat to hold a king size quilt rolled up on the take-up roller.  The only thing that happens is that your sewing "field" gets a bit smaller as you roll up the quilt.  Doesn't make any difference unless your doing a large panto (something over 12 inches) or large pattern blocks.  Hopes this helps.  Jim
  5. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Leida Glez in oil   
    I'm not certain, but I think the viscosity is either 1 or 2.  Hope this helps.  Jim
  6. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from NHDeb in Wool Bearding through the quilt   
    Deb:  I use wool batting all the time, and have never had a problem with bearding (one of the reasons I use it so much).  I use Hobbs wool, and maybe that's the reason for my good experience.  You might want to give it a try.  Jim
  7. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from InesR in Thread/Bobbin question   
    I looked at my boxes, and realized they were pencil boxes, and that I'd taken a piece of one inch PVC, cut to length, then split the long way. placed the two halves in the bottom of the boxes where they fit my M bobbins and bobbin case nicely.  Jim
  8. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Thread/Bobbin question   
    I looked at my boxes, and realized they were pencil boxes, and that I'd taken a piece of one inch PVC, cut to length, then split the long way. placed the two halves in the bottom of the boxes where they fit my M bobbins and bobbin case nicely.  Jim
  9. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from sewingpup in Thread/Bobbin question   
    I use a pencil box. or maybe it's a box designed for bobbins, I can't remember.  I put the bobbin case along with any bobbins wound with the thread the case is adjusted for, in it.  That way I can use up extra bobbin thread if the proper color happens to already be on a bobbin.  I have a box for each different thread and bobbin.  Keeps things convenient and well organized without much effort.  Jim
  10. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Track lighting above long arm?   
    I use track lighting to illuminate both for my long arms, and the entire space of our quilting studio.  Began years ago with halogen bulbs, which I've since replaced with LED's.  I like track because of the flexibility it offers.  If the original lighting plan is incorrect, or if your needs change, it is easy to move, add, or remove fixtures to better light your area.  I've used both PAR 38, and PAR 30 narrow beam flood bulbs.  Chose narrow beam because most of the light I need is task lighting.  I've primarily  bought 2700K or 3000K light color range, and 900-1200 lumen bulbs.  Back in 2013 I paid over $35 per bulb, for the PAR 38's but the price has come down substantially since.  As an example, I just replaced the florescent bulbs in my shop (screw in bulbs for track fixtures) a couple of weeks ago. I bought 40 PAR 30, 900 lumen, 25 degree floods for less than $100.  Bought them off e-bay.  I didn't like the florescent bulbs because they were slow to come to full illumination, especially when it's cold, and weren't focused at all.  The electric consumption between the LED and the florescent bulbs were about the same.  (the LED' are way less than the original halogens)
    I've managed to buy the the individual fixtures for about $10 each.  ( over the years I've probably bought 150 fixtures to light both the house and work areas)  When you flood the task areas with light, there doesn't seem much need for additional ambient light.  Do  yourself a favor and install track lighting over your quilting machine.  Then if you need to move light around, it's easy to do.   Jim
  11. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Gator in Track lighting above long arm?   
    I use track lighting to illuminate both for my long arms, and the entire space of our quilting studio.  Began years ago with halogen bulbs, which I've since replaced with LED's.  I like track because of the flexibility it offers.  If the original lighting plan is incorrect, or if your needs change, it is easy to move, add, or remove fixtures to better light your area.  I've used both PAR 38, and PAR 30 narrow beam flood bulbs.  Chose narrow beam because most of the light I need is task lighting.  I've primarily  bought 2700K or 3000K light color range, and 900-1200 lumen bulbs.  Back in 2013 I paid over $35 per bulb, for the PAR 38's but the price has come down substantially since.  As an example, I just replaced the florescent bulbs in my shop (screw in bulbs for track fixtures) a couple of weeks ago. I bought 40 PAR 30, 900 lumen, 25 degree floods for less than $100.  Bought them off e-bay.  I didn't like the florescent bulbs because they were slow to come to full illumination, especially when it's cold, and weren't focused at all.  The electric consumption between the LED and the florescent bulbs were about the same.  (the LED' are way less than the original halogens)
    I've managed to buy the the individual fixtures for about $10 each.  ( over the years I've probably bought 150 fixtures to light both the house and work areas)  When you flood the task areas with light, there doesn't seem much need for additional ambient light.  Do  yourself a favor and install track lighting over your quilting machine.  Then if you need to move light around, it's easy to do.   Jim
  12. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from NHDeb in Quilt path vs Intelliquilter   
    Mercedes:  I think you need to start by deciding how you want the computerized system to help you quilt.  Once you have a list of all the things you hope it will do for you, then begin asking if the system you're researching does that, and how it does it.  You need to think of the system as a tool that assists you to quilt, rather than some sort of stand alone thing.  Start with the tasks you like least doing manually, and work from there.  Jim
  13. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Stitching Problem   
    If your tension is tight on top, and the bobbin tension is moderate, and you're still getting flat lines on the back, your quilt sandwich might be too tight, or your hopping foot may be too low.  It could also be that your leveling roller is set too low, causing the quilt sandwich to forcefully drag on the needle plate.  Check them out as well.  Jim
  14. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from InesR in Laser problem   
    No better time than now to take control of your machine.  Follow the instructions, pull the hook, install the gasket, re-time and feel like you're really in control.  You really need to know how to pull the hook, and put it back together.  Being able to do that will empower you to deal with the issues that challenge all of us, and take fear and dread away from your quilting.  Good luck.  You can do it!  Jim
  15. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Gail O in Laser problem   
    No better time than now to take control of your machine.  Follow the instructions, pull the hook, install the gasket, re-time and feel like you're really in control.  You really need to know how to pull the hook, and put it back together.  Being able to do that will empower you to deal with the issues that challenge all of us, and take fear and dread away from your quilting.  Good luck.  You can do it!  Jim
  16. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from NHDeb in Speed of machine   
    Vicki:  The Ultimate II is a non-regulated machine, so the number of stitches per inch is controlled by the operator.  The slower the machine is moved, the greater the number of stitches per inch.  The faster it is moved, the fewer stitches per inch.  Similarly, the speed control also affects the number of stitches per inch.
    It's been a long time since my Ult2 was non-regulated, so my experience is a way back, but it seems to me that I used to run it at about 7 on a 10 point speed scale.  For a beginner I think starting slow would b e good plan.  Get yourself something to practice on and, and begin.  Start and stop.  Try different speeds.  In a couple of hours you should feel comfortable, and settle in on the speed that suits you.  Good luck.  Jim
  17. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from NHDeb in Should I own a longarm quilting machine?   
    I converted my Ult 2 to an M system about eight years ago.  I did it because I didn't like changing bobbins so often especially with TEX 40 thread.  It seemed like it was just a few minutes sewing before I had to change bobbins.  But mostly I changed it because I noticed that I experienced most of my tension issues immediately after changing bobbins.  L bobbin twice as many changes, M bobbin half as many.  L bobbin twice as many chances for tension problems.  Jim
  18. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from Quilta93 in George thread problems after bobbin changes   
    Donna:  Are you using a backlash spring in your bobbin case?  If so, check for lint or dirt under it.  Make sure your bobbin thread is routed properly in the bobbin case before you start.  Does this happen only when you begin a new bobbin, or other times when stop and start.  If only at the beginning, your bobbins may be overfilled.  This will cause thread to "fall" off the bobbin, wrap around the bobbin "axel", and pull top thread down to form the knot.  You may need to adjust your bobbin winder so it stops before the bobbin is too full.
    Bobbin changes have always been the event that gives me the majority of my tension problems.  That's why I converted my Ult 2 to an M bobbin system years ago.  Fewer bobbin changes, fewer tension problems.  Good luck.  Jim 
  19. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from InesR in George thread problems after bobbin changes   
    Donna:  Are you using a backlash spring in your bobbin case?  If so, check for lint or dirt under it.  Make sure your bobbin thread is routed properly in the bobbin case before you start.  Does this happen only when you begin a new bobbin, or other times when stop and start.  If only at the beginning, your bobbins may be overfilled.  This will cause thread to "fall" off the bobbin, wrap around the bobbin "axel", and pull top thread down to form the knot.  You may need to adjust your bobbin winder so it stops before the bobbin is too full.
    Bobbin changes have always been the event that gives me the majority of my tension problems.  That's why I converted my Ult 2 to an M bobbin system years ago.  Fewer bobbin changes, fewer tension problems.  Good luck.  Jim 
  20. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from judyday in George thread problems after bobbin changes   
    Donna:  Are you using a backlash spring in your bobbin case?  If so, check for lint or dirt under it.  Make sure your bobbin thread is routed properly in the bobbin case before you start.  Does this happen only when you begin a new bobbin, or other times when stop and start.  If only at the beginning, your bobbins may be overfilled.  This will cause thread to "fall" off the bobbin, wrap around the bobbin "axel", and pull top thread down to form the knot.  You may need to adjust your bobbin winder so it stops before the bobbin is too full.
    Bobbin changes have always been the event that gives me the majority of my tension problems.  That's why I converted my Ult 2 to an M bobbin system years ago.  Fewer bobbin changes, fewer tension problems.  Good luck.  Jim 
  21. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Thread breakage   
    Barb:  You'll get "pokies" if the top tension is really tighter than the bobbin, but I don't think you'll be there without a lot of tightening.  I think you're breaking thread because your top tension is way too loose.  Good luck.  Jim
  22. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from NHDeb in Tell me about your travel machine   
    Hard to beat an old Singer Featherweight.  Great machine, great carrying case, about as light as you can get.  It will sew the nicest seam you've ever seen.  Only straight stitch, but a really good straight stitch.  Jim
  23. Like
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Tell me about your travel machine   
    Hard to beat an old Singer Featherweight.  Great machine, great carrying case, about as light as you can get.  It will sew the nicest seam you've ever seen.  Only straight stitch, but a really good straight stitch.  Jim
  24. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Mary Beth in How do you handle?......   
    With light color thread the black light might help.
  25. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from quilterkp in Long Arm reviews   
    Bing:  If you think you will quilt professionally, do yourself a favor, and only consider the following manufactures:  A-1 Elite, APQS, Gammill, Innova, Nolting, or Prodigy.  They are industrial quality, and all offer good product support.  As far as repairs go, you probably won't need any.  I don't know too much about the Innova or the Prodigy, but the others are pretty simple and straight forward so most of the service needed you can do yourself.  Jim