jimerickson

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  1. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from MaryQuiltsTx in hopping foot and shank   
    Ida:  Since you "broke" the hopping foot clamp screw loose (broke is the term used in mechanics for applying enough torque to make a screw or bolt or nut turn), loosening it again should not be too difficult.  When you put everything back together make sure you tighten it significantly so the hopping foot shaft does not shift position with use.  BTW, you should rarely have to make any adjustment to the hopping foot shaft, so don't worry about accessing it easily.  Good luck.  Jim 
  2. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from quilterkp in Long Arm reviews   
    IMHO anything smaller than 20" is limiting, and anything over 25 or 26" puts you a long way from some of what you are sewing.  I think the BIG machine (28"-36") is really designed with computers in mind.  You can set up a large area to be quilted and let the machine go to it without having to move or re-calibrate.
    The best choice for someone, is something suited for the type quilting you plan to do.  Now for someone just starting out, it's a difficult call because you probably don't know what type quilting you're going to end up wanting to do.  My rule of thumb would be:  If you plan on doing a lot of detailed custom, go with a smaller machine (20"-24").  If you plan on doing mostly pantographs, go with a bigger machine (24"- 28"), and if you plan on doing computer driven stuff, go with the big machines.
    It is probably worth your time to carefully look at each manufacturers machines to see exactly how much area (front to back) their machine can quilt.  Not all 26" machines have the same sewing "field".  Some "smaller" machines may give you more "field" than nominally larger ones.  The shape of the machine, and the way the table is configured affects it's sewing "field".  For instance, three roller tables generally give you more "field" than four roller ones. Similarly, square throated machines will give you more "field" (assuming similar outside dimensions), than oval shaped ones.  Carefully checks the specs, and take a tape measure and check for yourself when you look at them.  There may also be convenience issues to consider.
     Unfortunately, there is a trade off with which ever you choose.  In the final analysis, who builds your machine might be the most important consideration.  Not all manufacturers support their products equally.  Go with someone you know you can trust to answer questions, have parts available for both current and past products, and provide prompt reliable service.  Jim
     
  3. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Accuquilt Studio sale   
    Just a heads up for all of you that have or want to have the Accuquilt Studio cutter, it and select bundles are on sale until June 9.  Free shipping (or at least free on some items) too.  Jim
  4. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from MaryQuiltsTx in info on a royal ken quilting machine with 14ft frame?   
    Just:  This post is over 3 years old, and about a machine made by a manufacturer not represented on this forum, so I doubt Bonway will respond.  That being said, I once owned a Ken Quilt 622.  Mine was the long model - don't think they've made that particular machine for at least 10 years - and since then, I've owned 3 other machines.  Does that tell you something?  I sold mine on e-Bay 8 years ago for $650.
    The 622 is a Singer model type 96 industrial sewing machine set up for frame quilting.  It's a heavy cast iron machine.  I think mine weighed over 70 lbs.  While you may be able to buy one very reasonably, I think you'd be better served saving your money and putting it toward a real purpose built longarm.  An APQS Ult ll would be a much better choice if you're looking for an economical longarm system.  In fact that's one of the machines I bought and I'm still using it today with both pride and satisfaction.
    As far as machine details for the 622 goes, I think a schematic for a Singer type 96 would probably do.  Hope this helps.  Jim
  5. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from MaryQuiltsTx in Different kind of top thread breakage   
    Mary:  I think Dawn addressed this question several years ago, and if I recall correctly, she said that the thread didn't quite break - a single fiber stayed in tact - and that's what allowed it to continue stitching.  Looks like it broke, but it didn't really.  I don't recall whether your machine was actually new, or merely new to you.  If it's just new to you, you may have damage to a thread guide, needle plate, or timing issues.  I just completed a T shirt quilt that I had all sorts of problems with.  I couldn't tell whether it was the quilt top or my machine.  After I finished SID on all the blocks I changed thread color, and had no further problems.  The same YLI Longarm Professional thread, just a different color.  I've concluded the problem was the thread, not the machine.  So it might even be your thread.  I hope I've help you search.  Good luck at discovering what's wrong.  Jim
  6. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from quilterkp in Needle holes   
    This is one of the reasons I supply the batting for all the quilts I do.  When I supply it, I at least know what it is and how to deal with it.  While I use wool most of the time now (it does not beard), back when I was using cotton blend, I'd use a black batting for quilts with red backs.  The black bearding is much less offensive on red.  Jim
  7. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from InesR in Needle holes   
    This is one of the reasons I supply the batting for all the quilts I do.  When I supply it, I at least know what it is and how to deal with it.  While I use wool most of the time now (it does not beard), back when I was using cotton blend, I'd use a black batting for quilts with red backs.  The black bearding is much less offensive on red.  Jim
  8. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from howellkerrie in Hydraulic Lifts - Feedback   
    Patrice:  I have an electric lift on my Ult 2, but think I can speak to the questions you've asked about power lifts.  I highly recommend them.  Before I bought my saddle stool, when I stood all the time while I quilted, I used my lift constantly.  Raising and lowering the table height depending on what I was quilting.  Now that I sit most of the time, I don't change the table height so often (I raise and lower the seat on my stool), but I still do sometimes change the table height, and would not want to be without the lift.  It's a feature I would want on any long arm I used.  Really saves on back pain.  Hope this helps.  Jim
  9. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Marti10245 in SOLD Ultimate I with stitch regulator   
    Bing:  If you're looking for a lot of bang for your buck, this is a great deal.  A first line machine that can serve you for the rest of your life.  Easy to up grade to computer drive in the future if you're so inclined.  Buy it!  Jim
  10. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from quilterkp in Thread   
    I use YLI Longarm Professional most of the time.  Use bottom Line almost exclusively in my bobbins.  I wind all my own bobbins on an industrial bobbin winder.  Longarm Professional is a polyester thread that is very strong.  It allows you to sew very rapidly without fear of breaking thread.  It is also low lint.  I get about 210 yards of Bottom Line on my M size bobbins.  Enough to complete small quilts with one bobbin when doing edge to edge.  Good reasons in my mind for using this combo.
    I tried Signature Permacore thread early on, but found it too linty for my tastes.  I use Glide occasionally when I want a special thread look, and Superior's Fantastico for variegated, and Twist for a different look.  I've found that Metro's Sigma performs very much like Glide, and it is much less expensive, so I use it now for "Glide" applications.  I never use cotton thread because of it's lack of strength, and it's lint.  Can't stand lint!  Jim
  11. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Delle in Thread breakage on new to me Freddie   
    Dell:  You mention problem with "freehand" does that mean that everything is fine when you stitch a panto?  Maybe "freehand" is all you've done so far.  If that's the case, it sounds like your top tension is too loose.  Tighten it up until you a pulling the bobbin thread to the top and can see it in every stitch (use contrasting color threads so you're sure which is which).  When the top thread is too loose, it will tangle on the back, and then break.  Good luck.  Jim 
  12. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Leida Glez in Canvas   
    You might try some kind of "dry cleaning" solvent and see if you can sponge off the stains.  I don't know what might be available in Spain, but herein the U.S. I'd start with lighter fluid.  Be careful with it and make sure you don't  un-glue the leader.  Jim
  13. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in SOLD Ultimate I with stitch regulator   
    Marti:  I don't want to contradict you, but that doesn't look like an Intellistitch regulator.  It looks more like Nolting's more basic regulator (I don't remember what they call it)  All the Intellistitch regulators I've seen have a round dial, and one or more little round lights on the control panel.  Jim  P.S.(I see from your photo it's called "Equalizer")
  14. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Casters on table and wood floors   
    Sheri:  I don't have casters as such on my machine, but rather retractable wheels.  They can be pressed down when you want to move the machine, and retracted when the machine is moved to where you want to use it.  Mine are on a laminate floor, and work great.
    I built my own set, but I believe you can buy them.  They are typically used on large stationary wood working tools such as table saws and the like.  I know Sears used to sell them, don't know whether they still do.  I imagine others offer them as well.  Check them out and see if they might not be a better choice than casters.  Jim 
     
     
     
     
     
    sheri:
  15. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Mary Beth in Pantos are not my thang!!   
    Mary Beth:  I built a set of electronic channel locks for my Ult 2 a while back.  If you or your husband are handy you could probably do the same if you have a mind to.  Check out my posts on Ult 2 mods from the last couple of years for photos.  I think it cost me about $250 for the parts I used.  Jim
  16. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from RitaR in Why should I purchase a Millenium?   
    Vicki:  You won't go wrong buying any of the top line (APQS, A-1, Gammill, Innova, Nolting or Prodigy) machines.  That being said assuming you like the APQS, the main reason to buy it is the customer service.  Their support is outstanding.  I think the others probably do a good job, but I have first hand experience with APQS, and theirs is great.  This forum is great.  I was on Gammill's for some time, and their's was good, but not this good.  It wasn't as user friendly nor quite so family like.  Nolting's also wasn't as good.
     
    The folks at APQS really are interested in seeing that your machine performs well, and is up and running as quickly as possible if you should have any down time.  They're easy to get a hold of, and most helpful.  Parts are shipped out quickly, and they provide all sorts of helpful instructions.  They couldn't be nicer.  There are somethings I don't like about their current line, (that can be said for everyone of the manufacturers I've mentioned) but you can't find a better company to do business with.  Jim
  17. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from T Row Studio in Hydraulic Lifts - Feedback   
    Patrice:  I have an electric lift on my Ult 2, but think I can speak to the questions you've asked about power lifts.  I highly recommend them.  Before I bought my saddle stool, when I stood all the time while I quilted, I used my lift constantly.  Raising and lowering the table height depending on what I was quilting.  Now that I sit most of the time, I don't change the table height so often (I raise and lower the seat on my stool), but I still do sometimes change the table height, and would not want to be without the lift.  It's a feature I would want on any long arm I used.  Really saves on back pain.  Hope this helps.  Jim
  18. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in CompuQuilter Problem   
    I just saw a two week old post by a new member about a problem she was having with her CompuQuilter.  There was one reply that may or may not of solved the problem.
     
    I know there are several long experienced CompuQuilters out there, but none responded.  I think it's probably because the post was kind of lost in the Compuquilter forum.  Farmsheila was the new forum member.  If any of you expert CompuQuilters have time, take a look at the post, and see if you can help Sheila out.  Thanks.  Jim
  19. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in CompuQuilter Problem   
    I just saw a two week old post by a new member about a problem she was having with her CompuQuilter.  There was one reply that may or may not of solved the problem.
     
    I know there are several long experienced CompuQuilters out there, but none responded.  I think it's probably because the post was kind of lost in the Compuquilter forum.  Farmsheila was the new forum member.  If any of you expert CompuQuilters have time, take a look at the post, and see if you can help Sheila out.  Thanks.  Jim
  20. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from InesR in Up and Running   
    It's the clamp that holds the roller position.  The old machines had a ratchet system to hold the rollers.  A lot of other manufactures still use them.  APQS replaced ratchets with "brakes" sometime back.  Jim
  21. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in New Lenni... Thread breakage, tension issues, jerky movements...   
    Susan:  I'm late to the discussion, but if you have bird's nests on the back, and you have pulled the bobbin thread and held the top thread when you started, the problem is too loose top tension.  The top thread gets pulled down, tangles, and breaks because of the tangle. You've apparently already discovered that your tension wasn't balanced.  The best way to adjust tension is to start with the top thread too tight, and then loosen until you get the stitch balance you're looking for.  Sewingpup gives good advice.  Start with some really strong thread combos, master tension with them, then move to the more difficult choices.  I'd recommend YLI Longarm Professional (not their cotton quilting thread) or Superior's Sew Fine, both of which are poly threads.  These are probably the least demanding of all the threads.
     
    By starting with this kind of thread, you eliminate a lot of thread related problems, which allows you to master other machine operations, like tension, movement speed, stitch length etc.  Similarly, I'd keep to easy quilting (something like a random meander) staying away from ruler work and patterns until you feel completely comfortable starting, stopping, pulling up bobbin thread and tying off.  That will give you time to get a feel for the machine, and it's operation.  The fewer variables, the fewer things to puzzle over, and quicker discovery.  Good luck.  Jim 
  22. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Jamie.bennett@hotmail.com in Help with Red Snappers   
    1030:  Pin on a piece of fabric the width of your leaders to the backer leader.  Then pin to the take up leader about 3" up on it.  Fold the leader over and pin it down, then using your horizontal channel lock, stitch along the leader edge to form the pocket.  Go through the same process for the other two leaders.  Pretty easy to do.  Good luck.  Jim
  23. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Southern Quilts in Should I upgrade my Ult I to a Millie?   
    Denise:  The I/S is Kasa Engineering's Intellistitch stitch regulator.  There is some question about getting one retrofitted to machines today as the service is declining in demand.  Also, they may have never made a kit for the XX, because there were so few of them made.  I've heard that Nolting does the installation on machines other than their own.  I don't know this for a fact, so it may not be true.  Nolting has a big machine like the XX, and perhaps they convert them, and maybe that conversion kit would fit an XX.  At any rate, I suggest you contact them and find out for sure.  I've also heard that Dave Jones also does installations, so that might also be a possibility as well.  BTW, the Intellistitch is an excellent full feature stitch regulator.  Jim
  24. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Leaders have a loose spot off center   
    B:  To take any slack out of the leader you're working on before stitching your reference line, take scrap pieces of batting and stuff them in the securing leader to pull the one you're marking taught.  Start with your take up leader.  Pin the backing leader to it, stuff the backing leader so that you the take up leader is uniformly taught, put on your channel lock and about two to two and a half  inches up on the take up leader, and stitch.  Pin the same securing leader to your stitched line, fold the excess of your take up leader over, and again with your channel lock on, stitch the pocket. ( a one inch pocket works well, and will accommodate quick attachment tools like Red Snappers)   Now trim off the uneven edge that left after the second stitch line.
     
    Once your take up leader is finished, remove any "stuffing" and starting about two to two and a half or two inches up on top leader, pin the take up leader edge to your top leader making sure any unevenness in the top leader is pulled out.  Fold the excess from the top leader over, and stitch a similar pocket in your top leader.  If you want, you can trim any unevenness, or simply leave it.  Now do the same for the backing leader, and you'll have the job done.  Good luck.  Jim
  25. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Sheila S. in Leader canvas   
    Sheila:  You can mark your leader more accurately with a stitched line than with a measured marker line.  Simply extend your take up leader ( or either of the other leaders for that matter) to almost the maximum reach of your machine, apply the horizontal channel lock (either electronic or manual) and stitch a line.  You'll probably have to pin to another leader to keep it tight while you stitch.  You can use that as your reference line, or fold and stitch a pocket then cut the excess off.  Your leader will be straight for a while.  
     
    The long term problem is that the leader fabric will distort over time from pulling and rolling, and eventually be out of alignment again.  I don't know what kind of fabric your leaders are made from.  It seems to me some machines come with a rather light fabric (mine did).  I replaced my leaders with a fairly heavy canvas. and they have held up reasonably well.  I made my leaders quite long (you might refer to them as deep rather than long) so I could keep the selvage on both edges.  The selvage helps to control fabric distortion.  Hope this helps.  Jim