jimerickson

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  1. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in Long arm needles   
    I've been quilting a series of whole cloth charity quilts on my Gammill, and decided that such a quilt offered an excellent opportunity to compare stitch quality and tension variations of the MR and SERV7 needles.  Being whole cloth quilts there would be no piecing seams, or variations in patch fabric to mask actual results.  I did a random meander, so I sewed rather rapidly.
     
    Now both needles performed well.  Both needles were 18/100.  I used Tex 40 YLI Longarm Professional as a top thread, Bottom Line as a bobbin thread, and polyester batting. All stitching was done from the front of the machine.  No skipped stitches, and no occasional loop on the back was noted with either needle.  (I've had an issue with the Gammill leaving an occasional single stitch loop on the  back recently, but increasing the tension on the thread take-up spring seems to have eliminated that problem)  I closely examined the stitch appearance both top and bottom, for both needles.  The directional tension changes was my focus.  While the difference was not great, I think the Schmetz SERV7 needle out performed the Groz-Beckert titanium coated MR san 11 needle.  The Schmetz needle produced more uniform stitches.  Going in bad directions (back and to the left) the Schmetz stitches were more balanced, making all the stitches look more uniform.  I emphasize again, there was not a great deal of difference.
     
    While the difference was not great, in my opinion, it is enough to convince me that the Schmetz SERV7 needle gives me better performance.  I plan to switch and use the Schmetz needles in the future.  Jim
  2. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in 2008 APQS Lenni, 12 foot table, Central NJ   
    This is a real buy!  One of you wanna-be's out there, buy it.  Jim
  3. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Juststitchin in For Sale 2002 Gammill Premier on 12' Table   
    Juststitchin:  This isn't intended to be critical, but  IMHO I think your asking price is unrealistic.  I have a feeling that your machine will not soon sell at that price.  For instance, if you look here under the used machine for sale forum, you'll see a similar machine offered just 2 weeks ago for $3800.  You can make the price anything you want, but don't expect a lot of interest at this one.  Just an alert.  Good luck.  Jim
  4. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Jamie.bennett@hotmail.com in Help with Red Snappers   
    1030:  Pin on a piece of fabric the width of your leaders to the backer leader.  Then pin to the take up leader about 3" up on it.  Fold the leader over and pin it down, then using your horizontal channel lock, stitch along the leader edge to form the pocket.  Go through the same process for the other two leaders.  Pretty easy to do.  Good luck.  Jim
  5. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from SusanH. in Hi from a new Lenni owner   
    Susan:  You'll love the up-grade!  Nothing like a real industrial machine.  Good luck.  Jim
  6. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Quilta93 in What to think about in deciding between machines?   
    Green:  I think you may be over valuing the Quilt Glide feature.  A lot of folks do micro work with the regulators turned off.  I even do that sometimes.  That said, I think you might be missing the value of the electronic channel locks, and I haven't heard you even mention the M bobbin system.  These were musts for me.  I have an Ultimate 2 that came without any bells and whistles.  These two features were so important to me that I fabricated them.  Once you use an M bobbin equipped machine, you'll never want to go back to the L's.  Only half the bobbin changes!  The thread cutter seems to be a wash, not many folks who have them actually use them.
     
    My Ult 2 is a 20" machine like the Lenni (in my configuration I actually have about two inches more sewing field than the Lenni), and I'm satisfied, but if I were buying another machine, it would be bigger.  I find myself struggling to SID around blocks larger than 14", and there are a significant number of quilt patterns with blocks larger than 14".  That's when I wish Zelda (my Ult 2) was a bit bigger.  Moving the quilt back and forth to do that job gets old.  Doing piano key borders without both channel locks requires more effort.  Just some more things to think about .  Regards.  Jim
  7. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Greenmtn in Millie vs. Freddy ?   
    Annie:  It would certainly be good to try each machine out at a road show or some other significant display event.  That will give you some idea of the feel of each variation.  However, I would listen carefully to what others say about the features of the different choices.  Things like bobbin size (L or M), bobbin winders, channel locks, thread cutters, power advance, batting access systems, take up roller adjustments, power lifts, light systems and the like can make a great deal of difference in how convenient a machine is to use day after day.  A test "drive" would likely not make those things apparent.  I've found some things I thought would be important, not to be so, while others that I kind of ignored, turned out to be of great importance.  Unfortunately, not everyone will have the same list of needs.
     
    My lists of musts would include M bobbin system, industrial bobbin winder, electronic channel locks, easy batting access, good LED lighting, responsive machine movement, and a good thread management (guides and tension device) system.  I have good reasons for this list.  Others, maybe not so much.
     
    The reason for the M bobbin:  In my experience most thread/tension issue occur in association with bobbin changes.  So, the fewer changes, the less stitch issues.
     
    Channel locks:  I use both my horizontal and vertical channel locks quite often.  I used manual ones before I installed electronics on my Ult 2, and found them to be quite combersome.
     
    Industrial bobbin winder:  I wind all my own bobbins, so how they wind is important to me.  Others use only pre-wound, and winding bobbins is not an issue for them.  Winding bobbins well and conveniently requires a good winder, and some machines come with really poor winders, be they part of the machine, or stand alone.
     
    Batting access system:  I frequently have problems with wrinkles in my batting and feel like I have to easily get to the batting to smooth it out.  There can be a big difference in how easy it is to get at the batting from one machine/system to another.
     
    Power advance:  I don't have a power advance system on my table.  I know some folks wouldn't be without them, but for me, it doesn't seem so important.  That being said, if I had ever used such a device I might have a different opinion.  But I know at least one person here on the forum has removed his power advance because it was an unnecessary complication that served little purpose.
     
    Now I've listed a few of the things that are important to me.  They are important because of the way I personally quilt.  You'll have to think about how you plan to use your new system, and think through some of the benefits and disadvantages of each feature.  Good luck on your quest.  Jim  
  8. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from JuneR in Snappers, Grips or Zippers?   
    I had a set of red Snappers for a while, but sold them.  Like Oma, they got in way near the take-up roller, required more extra back to attach, and I never felt confident I had the back (or the top for that matter) was attached parallel to the rollers.  Jim
  9. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Anniam in Millie vs. Freddy ?   
    Annie:  It would certainly be good to try each machine out at a road show or some other significant display event.  That will give you some idea of the feel of each variation.  However, I would listen carefully to what others say about the features of the different choices.  Things like bobbin size (L or M), bobbin winders, channel locks, thread cutters, power advance, batting access systems, take up roller adjustments, power lifts, light systems and the like can make a great deal of difference in how convenient a machine is to use day after day.  A test "drive" would likely not make those things apparent.  I've found some things I thought would be important, not to be so, while others that I kind of ignored, turned out to be of great importance.  Unfortunately, not everyone will have the same list of needs.
     
    My lists of musts would include M bobbin system, industrial bobbin winder, electronic channel locks, easy batting access, good LED lighting, responsive machine movement, and a good thread management (guides and tension device) system.  I have good reasons for this list.  Others, maybe not so much.
     
    The reason for the M bobbin:  In my experience most thread/tension issue occur in association with bobbin changes.  So, the fewer changes, the less stitch issues.
     
    Channel locks:  I use both my horizontal and vertical channel locks quite often.  I used manual ones before I installed electronics on my Ult 2, and found them to be quite combersome.
     
    Industrial bobbin winder:  I wind all my own bobbins, so how they wind is important to me.  Others use only pre-wound, and winding bobbins is not an issue for them.  Winding bobbins well and conveniently requires a good winder, and some machines come with really poor winders, be they part of the machine, or stand alone.
     
    Batting access system:  I frequently have problems with wrinkles in my batting and feel like I have to easily get to the batting to smooth it out.  There can be a big difference in how easy it is to get at the batting from one machine/system to another.
     
    Power advance:  I don't have a power advance system on my table.  I know some folks wouldn't be without them, but for me, it doesn't seem so important.  That being said, if I had ever used such a device I might have a different opinion.  But I know at least one person here on the forum has removed his power advance because it was an unnecessary complication that served little purpose.
     
    Now I've listed a few of the things that are important to me.  They are important because of the way I personally quilt.  You'll have to think about how you plan to use your new system, and think through some of the benefits and disadvantages of each feature.  Good luck on your quest.  Jim  
  10. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in Long arm needles   
    I said that I wasn't going to experiment with the Organ needles anymore.  Well, I had a couple of small jobs, and decided to try the Organs out again.  The only problem I had was that I broke the thread once.  Now this rarely happens with the YLI Longarm Professional thread I usually use.   It might have been due to a quilt sandwich that wasn't just right, or more likely because of timing.  You'll recall that I re-timed Zelda for the Schmetz needles, but not the Organs,  You'll also note that the scarf of the Organ needle is the smallest of the needles I've been testing.  It could be that the hooks meets the scarf a bit higher than it should, and that "lack of space" was responsible for the break, or maybe I was just sewing too fast, I'm not sure.  I slowed down and didn't break the thread again.  In fact, I sewed the second project with Glide thread, sewing relatively slowly, and had no problem with that thread either.  The Organ needle worked OK.
     
    Now unless you have easy access to Organ needles and problems with buying either the Schmetz or Groz-Beckert  needles, there doesn't seem to a good reason to change.  In fact the smaller scarf might be a reason not to use them.  All the needles I tested seem to be priced pretty much the same when purchased in 100 needle packs (some where between $30-$40), so cost shouldn't be much of a consideration.  All the needles tested worked well.  No missed stitches when the timing was  set properly.  Because of the different shapes of the needles, the Schmetz and Organ needles poke a smaller hole in the fabric than the MR needles.  Supposedly, that allows you to use one size larger needle of the non-MR with the same fabric appearance.  So you could use an 18 instead of a 16 with the same look.  Larger needles are stiffer, so that could be a benefit of moving away from MR's.  On the other hand the MR's are probably more timing forgiving.  You decide.  I like the Schmetz SERV 7 enough to switch.  I bought 50 each of 16's and 18's, and will use the MR's I have on my Gammill.  Jim   
  11. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Bonnie in Ok in Long arm needles   
    For years I've puzzled over sewing machine needles and the vast range of nomenclature to identify them.  It started more than ten years ago, with my wife's Babylock serger, and has been a puzzle for me ever since.  Little by little I'm beginning to unravel this mystery.  Heidi's post of a week or so about Schmetz needles got me going again.
     
    I have used Groz-Beckert 134 MR GEBEDUR FFG/SES needles almost exclusively, with an occasional Singer 1955 MR needle thrown in.  They've served me well, but I'm always interested in trying new things with the hope I might find something that I like better.  With that in mind, I just ordered some needles made by Schmetz, and Organ that I think will work in my machine (this is where the mystery comes in)  It is difficult to know exactly what needle works in my machine from the package nomenclature.
     
    Here are the package ID's of the needles I use, and the ones I ordered:
     
    Singer                  Groz-Beckert  Schmetz*           Schmetz              Organ
    1955-01-MR4.0   134 MR           CANU:20:05 1   CANU:20:05 17    135x5
    Set/R                   1955MR          134R                 134R SERV 7      DPx5
    134    135x5        134 SAN 11     135x5                135x5 SERV7     135x7
    797     DPx5        DPx 5 MR        SY 1955             DPx5  SERV 7    134R - 1955
                                                       DPx5
     
    The Schmetz needle with the * is the one Heidi is using.  The other is the one listed as the long arm needle on the web site link that was referenced by someone else in that thread.
     
    Now I do know what some of the designations mean.  For instance the MR stands for a needle configuration intended for multi-directional sewing.  The 1955 represents a style of needle I think, and is probably duplicated by the R, and Set/R designation.  The DPx5 I think means the same as the 135x5 and the 134 which I believe is the length of the needle, and the position of the eye.  The CANU 20 I think represents the thickness of the needle shank.  I know that the SAN 11 is important, but I don't know exactly what it means.  Perhaps, how large the scarf is.
     
    The MR (multi range) needle provides a particular blade configuration and shank that is stiffer than others to proved needle deflection resistance.  The SERV 7 design provides the same sort of benefit as the MR, but in a bit different way.  Both have a larger and deeper thread groove in the front of the needle.
     
    Interestingly, the size needle recommended by Superior Threads, deals not with what you're sewing, but rather what thread (mostly size) that you're using.  I notice that they recommended using an 18 or 19 size needle for King Tut, and a 19 or 21 size for Lava.  Perhaps folks who use these threads (I don't), and have problems, have so, because they are trying to use too small a needle.  The size of the groove in the front of the needle being the issue, not the needle eye size, needle diameter, or the fabric being sewed. 
     
    I plan to experiment with the three new to me needles on the list, and find out if, and how well, they work.  I'll up date this thread with my impressions and thoughts on each.  Jim
     
    BTW, I'm not quite sure about the nomenclature on the second Schmetz, and I'll check it, and make any appropriate corrections when the packs of needles arrive.  Also, anyone who know exactly what any of the designation codes mean, feel free to share your knowledge.
  12. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from T Row Studio in avoiding turkey tracks   
    Tighten the top tension.
     
    I'm going to complain again about the terms some folks use to identify long arm parts.  In this case, the bobbin "finger".  I believe what's being referred to, is the bobbin tension spring.  Or is it the "finger" that holds the bobbin basket in place?  See what I mean.  It makes giving advise more difficult because there can be confusion about what's being referred to.  Please try and use the actual name of the part when referencing your machine.  If you don't know what it's called, do some research and try to identify it properly.  Thanks.  Jim
  13. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from fallenfar in avoiding turkey tracks   
    Tighten the top tension.
     
    I'm going to complain again about the terms some folks use to identify long arm parts.  In this case, the bobbin "finger".  I believe what's being referred to, is the bobbin tension spring.  Or is it the "finger" that holds the bobbin basket in place?  See what I mean.  It makes giving advise more difficult because there can be confusion about what's being referred to.  Please try and use the actual name of the part when referencing your machine.  If you don't know what it's called, do some research and try to identify it properly.  Thanks.  Jim
  14. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from fallenfar in Batting   
    Sheila:  I recently began using wool batting,  The loft is lovely, it sews like a dream and is light in weight.  The only short coming I see is the cost, about twice that of cotton poly.  It's my go to batting.  Jim
  15. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Long arm needles   
    I received my new needles this week.  Two Schmetz variations, and one Organ.  I've tried the two Schmetz, but not the Organ.
     
    Let me start by saying that on my machine the needles were not interchangeable.  They fit and sewed fine, but made more noise than the Groz-Beckert they replaced.  After sewing a bit with each different Schmetz, I decided to check my timing because I guessed the additional noise was from the hook striking the needle.  Sure enough when I checked the hook was hitting the needle.  Not enough to mark the needle, but definitely deflecting it a bit.
     
    Initial observations:  The various needles differed in overall length from the longest (the Organ) at 1.526" to the shortest (Schmetz SERV 7) at 1.520".  The Groz-Beckert and Singer (same needle) were 1.522", and the other Schmetz measured 1.525".  All had a needle bar shank diameter of .078".  The Organ and the Schmetz SERV7 have stepped diameters on the needle body, while the other 3 where the same the length of the needle.  While looking at the needle suggested that the scarf depth on the Groz-Beckert was deeper than the other 3, and the reason I believed the hook was hitting the needle, I was unable to measure any difference.  Now I don't have extremely accurate measuring tools, so there might be a difference, but I couldn't find it (BTW the measurement I got was .010 for them all).  The length of the scarf did vary some.  the Groz-Beckert was the longest at .140", and the Organ was the shortest at .115".  
     
    I've re-timed my machine so that the hook does not strike the Schmetz needle and have done some sewing with it.  (It is the SERV7 varriant, (20:05 17), not the one Heidi has been using (20:05 1))  I am favorably impressed.  It may be that the diagram of the needle groove-eye- point configuration I saw, has so impressed me that I have a self fulfilling expectation, but the needle seems to sew nicer.  I've noticed no skipped stitches, but then I rarely had them when using the G-B's.  The stitching I have done has not been terribly demanding, but I've noticed no more needle deflection with the Schmetz than my usual G-B.  The stitching noise level seems to be about the same.  All my experiments have involved size 18 / 4.0 size needles.
     
    Since I re-timed my machine, I plan on using the Schmetz needle in the near future.  The timing adjustment should allow me to test the Organ needle as well.  I'll continue to share what I learn.  Jim    
  16. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from T Row Studio in Long arm needles   
    For years I've puzzled over sewing machine needles and the vast range of nomenclature to identify them.  It started more than ten years ago, with my wife's Babylock serger, and has been a puzzle for me ever since.  Little by little I'm beginning to unravel this mystery.  Heidi's post of a week or so about Schmetz needles got me going again.
     
    I have used Groz-Beckert 134 MR GEBEDUR FFG/SES needles almost exclusively, with an occasional Singer 1955 MR needle thrown in.  They've served me well, but I'm always interested in trying new things with the hope I might find something that I like better.  With that in mind, I just ordered some needles made by Schmetz, and Organ that I think will work in my machine (this is where the mystery comes in)  It is difficult to know exactly what needle works in my machine from the package nomenclature.
     
    Here are the package ID's of the needles I use, and the ones I ordered:
     
    Singer                  Groz-Beckert  Schmetz*           Schmetz              Organ
    1955-01-MR4.0   134 MR           CANU:20:05 1   CANU:20:05 17    135x5
    Set/R                   1955MR          134R                 134R SERV 7      DPx5
    134    135x5        134 SAN 11     135x5                135x5 SERV7     135x7
    797     DPx5        DPx 5 MR        SY 1955             DPx5  SERV 7    134R - 1955
                                                       DPx5
     
    The Schmetz needle with the * is the one Heidi is using.  The other is the one listed as the long arm needle on the web site link that was referenced by someone else in that thread.
     
    Now I do know what some of the designations mean.  For instance the MR stands for a needle configuration intended for multi-directional sewing.  The 1955 represents a style of needle I think, and is probably duplicated by the R, and Set/R designation.  The DPx5 I think means the same as the 135x5 and the 134 which I believe is the length of the needle, and the position of the eye.  The CANU 20 I think represents the thickness of the needle shank.  I know that the SAN 11 is important, but I don't know exactly what it means.  Perhaps, how large the scarf is.
     
    The MR (multi range) needle provides a particular blade configuration and shank that is stiffer than others to proved needle deflection resistance.  The SERV 7 design provides the same sort of benefit as the MR, but in a bit different way.  Both have a larger and deeper thread groove in the front of the needle.
     
    Interestingly, the size needle recommended by Superior Threads, deals not with what you're sewing, but rather what thread (mostly size) that you're using.  I notice that they recommended using an 18 or 19 size needle for King Tut, and a 19 or 21 size for Lava.  Perhaps folks who use these threads (I don't), and have problems, have so, because they are trying to use too small a needle.  The size of the groove in the front of the needle being the issue, not the needle eye size, needle diameter, or the fabric being sewed. 
     
    I plan to experiment with the three new to me needles on the list, and find out if, and how well, they work.  I'll up date this thread with my impressions and thoughts on each.  Jim
     
    BTW, I'm not quite sure about the nomenclature on the second Schmetz, and I'll check it, and make any appropriate corrections when the packs of needles arrive.  Also, anyone who know exactly what any of the designation codes mean, feel free to share your knowledge.
  17. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Quilting Regina in Long arm needles   
    I received my new needles this week.  Two Schmetz variations, and one Organ.  I've tried the two Schmetz, but not the Organ.
     
    Let me start by saying that on my machine the needles were not interchangeable.  They fit and sewed fine, but made more noise than the Groz-Beckert they replaced.  After sewing a bit with each different Schmetz, I decided to check my timing because I guessed the additional noise was from the hook striking the needle.  Sure enough when I checked the hook was hitting the needle.  Not enough to mark the needle, but definitely deflecting it a bit.
     
    Initial observations:  The various needles differed in overall length from the longest (the Organ) at 1.526" to the shortest (Schmetz SERV 7) at 1.520".  The Groz-Beckert and Singer (same needle) were 1.522", and the other Schmetz measured 1.525".  All had a needle bar shank diameter of .078".  The Organ and the Schmetz SERV7 have stepped diameters on the needle body, while the other 3 where the same the length of the needle.  While looking at the needle suggested that the scarf depth on the Groz-Beckert was deeper than the other 3, and the reason I believed the hook was hitting the needle, I was unable to measure any difference.  Now I don't have extremely accurate measuring tools, so there might be a difference, but I couldn't find it (BTW the measurement I got was .010 for them all).  The length of the scarf did vary some.  the Groz-Beckert was the longest at .140", and the Organ was the shortest at .115".  
     
    I've re-timed my machine so that the hook does not strike the Schmetz needle and have done some sewing with it.  (It is the SERV7 varriant, (20:05 17), not the one Heidi has been using (20:05 1))  I am favorably impressed.  It may be that the diagram of the needle groove-eye- point configuration I saw, has so impressed me that I have a self fulfilling expectation, but the needle seems to sew nicer.  I've noticed no skipped stitches, but then I rarely had them when using the G-B's.  The stitching I have done has not been terribly demanding, but I've noticed no more needle deflection with the Schmetz than my usual G-B.  The stitching noise level seems to be about the same.  All my experiments have involved size 18 / 4.0 size needles.
     
    Since I re-timed my machine, I plan on using the Schmetz needle in the near future.  The timing adjustment should allow me to test the Organ needle as well.  I'll continue to share what I learn.  Jim    
  18. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from gkazee in Quilt Glide question   
    While my comments don't deal specifically with quilt glide, I would remind everyone that as your stitches per inch increase, so does you top tension.  The same tension setting at 6 stitches per inch is WAY looser than it is at 16 spi.  So if you significantly change stitch count, you'll need to adjust tension.  Jim
  19. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Quilta93 in Quilt Glide question   
    While my comments don't deal specifically with quilt glide, I would remind everyone that as your stitches per inch increase, so does you top tension.  The same tension setting at 6 stitches per inch is WAY looser than it is at 16 spi.  So if you significantly change stitch count, you'll need to adjust tension.  Jim
  20. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Quilt Glide question   
    While my comments don't deal specifically with quilt glide, I would remind everyone that as your stitches per inch increase, so does you top tension.  The same tension setting at 6 stitches per inch is WAY looser than it is at 16 spi.  So if you significantly change stitch count, you'll need to adjust tension.  Jim
  21. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Sheagatzi in Quilt Glide question   
    While my comments don't deal specifically with quilt glide, I would remind everyone that as your stitches per inch increase, so does you top tension.  The same tension setting at 6 stitches per inch is WAY looser than it is at 16 spi.  So if you significantly change stitch count, you'll need to adjust tension.  Jim
  22. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in Long arm needles   
    For years I've puzzled over sewing machine needles and the vast range of nomenclature to identify them.  It started more than ten years ago, with my wife's Babylock serger, and has been a puzzle for me ever since.  Little by little I'm beginning to unravel this mystery.  Heidi's post of a week or so about Schmetz needles got me going again.
     
    I have used Groz-Beckert 134 MR GEBEDUR FFG/SES needles almost exclusively, with an occasional Singer 1955 MR needle thrown in.  They've served me well, but I'm always interested in trying new things with the hope I might find something that I like better.  With that in mind, I just ordered some needles made by Schmetz, and Organ that I think will work in my machine (this is where the mystery comes in)  It is difficult to know exactly what needle works in my machine from the package nomenclature.
     
    Here are the package ID's of the needles I use, and the ones I ordered:
     
    Singer                  Groz-Beckert  Schmetz*           Schmetz              Organ
    1955-01-MR4.0   134 MR           CANU:20:05 1   CANU:20:05 17    135x5
    Set/R                   1955MR          134R                 134R SERV 7      DPx5
    134    135x5        134 SAN 11     135x5                135x5 SERV7     135x7
    797     DPx5        DPx 5 MR        SY 1955             DPx5  SERV 7    134R - 1955
                                                       DPx5
     
    The Schmetz needle with the * is the one Heidi is using.  The other is the one listed as the long arm needle on the web site link that was referenced by someone else in that thread.
     
    Now I do know what some of the designations mean.  For instance the MR stands for a needle configuration intended for multi-directional sewing.  The 1955 represents a style of needle I think, and is probably duplicated by the R, and Set/R designation.  The DPx5 I think means the same as the 135x5 and the 134 which I believe is the length of the needle, and the position of the eye.  The CANU 20 I think represents the thickness of the needle shank.  I know that the SAN 11 is important, but I don't know exactly what it means.  Perhaps, how large the scarf is.
     
    The MR (multi range) needle provides a particular blade configuration and shank that is stiffer than others to proved needle deflection resistance.  The SERV 7 design provides the same sort of benefit as the MR, but in a bit different way.  Both have a larger and deeper thread groove in the front of the needle.
     
    Interestingly, the size needle recommended by Superior Threads, deals not with what you're sewing, but rather what thread (mostly size) that you're using.  I notice that they recommended using an 18 or 19 size needle for King Tut, and a 19 or 21 size for Lava.  Perhaps folks who use these threads (I don't), and have problems, have so, because they are trying to use too small a needle.  The size of the groove in the front of the needle being the issue, not the needle eye size, needle diameter, or the fabric being sewed. 
     
    I plan to experiment with the three new to me needles on the list, and find out if, and how well, they work.  I'll up date this thread with my impressions and thoughts on each.  Jim
     
    BTW, I'm not quite sure about the nomenclature on the second Schmetz, and I'll check it, and make any appropriate corrections when the packs of needles arrive.  Also, anyone who know exactly what any of the designation codes mean, feel free to share your knowledge.
  23. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from fallenfar in 2002 Millennium, 14' Table for Sale- (SOLD)   
    Now this is a real buy!  Any wanta-be out there, snap this one up.  Buy now, ask questions later!  You'll look long and hard to match this.  I sure wish something like this had come along when I was looking for a machine.  Jim
  24. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Quilta93 in Long arm needles   
    For years I've puzzled over sewing machine needles and the vast range of nomenclature to identify them.  It started more than ten years ago, with my wife's Babylock serger, and has been a puzzle for me ever since.  Little by little I'm beginning to unravel this mystery.  Heidi's post of a week or so about Schmetz needles got me going again.
     
    I have used Groz-Beckert 134 MR GEBEDUR FFG/SES needles almost exclusively, with an occasional Singer 1955 MR needle thrown in.  They've served me well, but I'm always interested in trying new things with the hope I might find something that I like better.  With that in mind, I just ordered some needles made by Schmetz, and Organ that I think will work in my machine (this is where the mystery comes in)  It is difficult to know exactly what needle works in my machine from the package nomenclature.
     
    Here are the package ID's of the needles I use, and the ones I ordered:
     
    Singer                  Groz-Beckert  Schmetz*           Schmetz              Organ
    1955-01-MR4.0   134 MR           CANU:20:05 1   CANU:20:05 17    135x5
    Set/R                   1955MR          134R                 134R SERV 7      DPx5
    134    135x5        134 SAN 11     135x5                135x5 SERV7     135x7
    797     DPx5        DPx 5 MR        SY 1955             DPx5  SERV 7    134R - 1955
                                                       DPx5
     
    The Schmetz needle with the * is the one Heidi is using.  The other is the one listed as the long arm needle on the web site link that was referenced by someone else in that thread.
     
    Now I do know what some of the designations mean.  For instance the MR stands for a needle configuration intended for multi-directional sewing.  The 1955 represents a style of needle I think, and is probably duplicated by the R, and Set/R designation.  The DPx5 I think means the same as the 135x5 and the 134 which I believe is the length of the needle, and the position of the eye.  The CANU 20 I think represents the thickness of the needle shank.  I know that the SAN 11 is important, but I don't know exactly what it means.  Perhaps, how large the scarf is.
     
    The MR (multi range) needle provides a particular blade configuration and shank that is stiffer than others to proved needle deflection resistance.  The SERV 7 design provides the same sort of benefit as the MR, but in a bit different way.  Both have a larger and deeper thread groove in the front of the needle.
     
    Interestingly, the size needle recommended by Superior Threads, deals not with what you're sewing, but rather what thread (mostly size) that you're using.  I notice that they recommended using an 18 or 19 size needle for King Tut, and a 19 or 21 size for Lava.  Perhaps folks who use these threads (I don't), and have problems, have so, because they are trying to use too small a needle.  The size of the groove in the front of the needle being the issue, not the needle eye size, needle diameter, or the fabric being sewed. 
     
    I plan to experiment with the three new to me needles on the list, and find out if, and how well, they work.  I'll up date this thread with my impressions and thoughts on each.  Jim
     
    BTW, I'm not quite sure about the nomenclature on the second Schmetz, and I'll check it, and make any appropriate corrections when the packs of needles arrive.  Also, anyone who know exactly what any of the designation codes mean, feel free to share your knowledge.
  25. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from fallenfar in Millies needle sounds like it's catching on the upswing   
    Bitty:  If I understand what you said, your needle is in backwards.  The "bump" should be to the front of the machine.  Take your finger nail and run it down the needle.  On one side there is a groove, on the other it is smooth.  The groove is for the thread, and should be facing forward.  That positions the notch that the hook rotates through, to the backside of the machine.  If it's put in the other way, the hook will hit the "bump", and make the clicking noise you hear.  
     
    To make changing the needle easier for me, I have replaced the screwdriver type original clamping screw with an Allen socket headed screw.  Much easier to use.  You can even leave the Allen key in the screw after loosening it so you don't have to find the socket in order to tighten it.   Bought it from Ray at Quilt Tech.  Good luck.  Jim