jimerickson

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  1. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Marti10245 in Needle bar & timing   
    Marti:  I changed out my needle bar and bushings about 3 years ago.  APQS wants you to change the bar along with the bushings.  If there is any play in the bushing/bar (grab the end of the bar and tug it front to back and side to side-if there's any wiggle the bushings need to be replaced)  The replacement wasn't particularly difficult.  You need to take your machine off the table so you can turn it on it's side while the sealer sets.  APQS provided great instructions with the parts.  You need to tap the old bushings out which I don't remember being difficult or nerve racking (it was 3 years ago so my recollection might not be that good)  
     
    While you have your machine off the table, it might be a good time to check the grease in your gear box.  Hope this helps.  Jim
  2. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from T Row Studio in Poor stitch quality   
    Carrie:  I think your problem is with your take-up spring.  It's improperly adjusted, or doesn't have enough tension to pull the stitch tight.  First make sure it is moving freely, and at rest, it's at about the "11 o'clock" position.  If those two are OK, you'll need to increase the tension on the spring.  That involves removing the tension assembly from the machine, loosening the screw that clamps the main tension rod, rotating the rod to increase the tension on the spring, tightening the clamping screw, and then putting the tension assembly back in the machine.  Oh, by the way, before you start, check to make sure the spring isn't damaged.  Good luck.  Jim 
  3. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from nancys13 in Thread breakage, and Sewers Aid   
    For those of you who use Sewers Aid regularly, this will come as no revelation, but for those of us who don't, I must say I think a lot of thread issues can be solved by using it.
     
    For a long time I've heard people talk about using silicon to lube thread.  Most mention Sewers Aid.  I occasionally looked a places like JoAnn's, but never found it.  Finally I decided I needed some, and looked hard at our LQS.  I found it in a tiny bottle on a card board package.  The reason I had never found it before was that I was looking for something that looked completely different.  (a large bottle, or a spray can)
     
    I had an opportunity to use it on a particularly difficult to sew Amazon Star quilt make with all batiks.  (the problems I was having with this quilt is the reason I decided I needed to find some)  Well, I have say, it made a world of difference.  The only problem I had while using it was that I had to reapply occasionally as it wore off.
     
    Since I finished the Amazon Star, I've done some experimenting, and found it helps with other issues I've had.  You might have noted that in the past I've said that I've had some problems with Glide thread breaking, and avoid using it when I can.  Well, a bit of Sewers Aid helps with that.  It looks like I can now use Glide thread without fear of breaks.  All I'll have to do is reapply whenever I encounter a thread break.
     
    So, for any of you out there who haven't used it, and encounter thread breakage problems that aren't cause by machine maladjustment, do yourself a favor, get some Sewers Aid, and use it.  Jim 
     
     
  4. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from KarenH in Thread breakage, and Sewers Aid   
    For those of you who use Sewers Aid regularly, this will come as no revelation, but for those of us who don't, I must say I think a lot of thread issues can be solved by using it.
     
    For a long time I've heard people talk about using silicon to lube thread.  Most mention Sewers Aid.  I occasionally looked a places like JoAnn's, but never found it.  Finally I decided I needed some, and looked hard at our LQS.  I found it in a tiny bottle on a card board package.  The reason I had never found it before was that I was looking for something that looked completely different.  (a large bottle, or a spray can)
     
    I had an opportunity to use it on a particularly difficult to sew Amazon Star quilt make with all batiks.  (the problems I was having with this quilt is the reason I decided I needed to find some)  Well, I have say, it made a world of difference.  The only problem I had while using it was that I had to reapply occasionally as it wore off.
     
    Since I finished the Amazon Star, I've done some experimenting, and found it helps with other issues I've had.  You might have noted that in the past I've said that I've had some problems with Glide thread breaking, and avoid using it when I can.  Well, a bit of Sewers Aid helps with that.  It looks like I can now use Glide thread without fear of breaks.  All I'll have to do is reapply whenever I encounter a thread break.
     
    So, for any of you out there who haven't used it, and encounter thread breakage problems that aren't cause by machine maladjustment, do yourself a favor, get some Sewers Aid, and use it.  Jim 
     
     
  5. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in Thread breakage, and Sewers Aid   
    For those of you who use Sewers Aid regularly, this will come as no revelation, but for those of us who don't, I must say I think a lot of thread issues can be solved by using it.
     
    For a long time I've heard people talk about using silicon to lube thread.  Most mention Sewers Aid.  I occasionally looked a places like JoAnn's, but never found it.  Finally I decided I needed some, and looked hard at our LQS.  I found it in a tiny bottle on a card board package.  The reason I had never found it before was that I was looking for something that looked completely different.  (a large bottle, or a spray can)
     
    I had an opportunity to use it on a particularly difficult to sew Amazon Star quilt make with all batiks.  (the problems I was having with this quilt is the reason I decided I needed to find some)  Well, I have say, it made a world of difference.  The only problem I had while using it was that I had to reapply occasionally as it wore off.
     
    Since I finished the Amazon Star, I've done some experimenting, and found it helps with other issues I've had.  You might have noted that in the past I've said that I've had some problems with Glide thread breaking, and avoid using it when I can.  Well, a bit of Sewers Aid helps with that.  It looks like I can now use Glide thread without fear of breaks.  All I'll have to do is reapply whenever I encounter a thread break.
     
    So, for any of you out there who haven't used it, and encounter thread breakage problems that aren't cause by machine maladjustment, do yourself a favor, get some Sewers Aid, and use it.  Jim 
     
     
  6. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from dbams in Thread breakage, and Sewers Aid   
    For those of you who use Sewers Aid regularly, this will come as no revelation, but for those of us who don't, I must say I think a lot of thread issues can be solved by using it.
     
    For a long time I've heard people talk about using silicon to lube thread.  Most mention Sewers Aid.  I occasionally looked a places like JoAnn's, but never found it.  Finally I decided I needed some, and looked hard at our LQS.  I found it in a tiny bottle on a card board package.  The reason I had never found it before was that I was looking for something that looked completely different.  (a large bottle, or a spray can)
     
    I had an opportunity to use it on a particularly difficult to sew Amazon Star quilt make with all batiks.  (the problems I was having with this quilt is the reason I decided I needed to find some)  Well, I have say, it made a world of difference.  The only problem I had while using it was that I had to reapply occasionally as it wore off.
     
    Since I finished the Amazon Star, I've done some experimenting, and found it helps with other issues I've had.  You might have noted that in the past I've said that I've had some problems with Glide thread breaking, and avoid using it when I can.  Well, a bit of Sewers Aid helps with that.  It looks like I can now use Glide thread without fear of breaks.  All I'll have to do is reapply whenever I encounter a thread break.
     
    So, for any of you out there who haven't used it, and encounter thread breakage problems that aren't cause by machine maladjustment, do yourself a favor, get some Sewers Aid, and use it.  Jim 
     
     
  7. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from judyday in Magnetic pin cushion   
    I have a magnetic wrist band that I use to hold the pins I pin quilt backs and tops on with.  I use small "T" pins.  It works fine.  A bit over challenged with the number of pins for king size quilts, but OK.  After I pin on though, I remove the wrist band (and also anytime I'm doing anything but pinning on), because pins will get brushed off and fall hither and yon.  Except for my stitch regulator, I don't have any electronics, so I can't comment on that.  No problem with the stitch regulator.  Jim
  8. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from lkl in L or M bobbin   
    Deb:  I have an Ult 2 that originally had the L bobbin system, and I converted to an M.  Having the same machine with both systems gave me unique insight to relative performance.  I never saw a difference in stitch quality.  The M sews every bit as good as the L.
     
    In my experience quilting, the chance for performance issues comes primarily at bobbin changes.  The occasional tension/stitch quality problems come after a bobbin change.  Since you have twice the amount of thread on an M bobbin that you have on an L, your bobbin changes are half as often.  So you reduce those problems by half.  Bobbin changes also slow you down.
     
    I wind all my own bobbins.  I use the commercial bobbin winder that I think came with my machine originally (bought her used so I really don't know) and never have any winding issues.  It's too bad APQS stopped providing that type of winder with their machines.  In fact I have two bobbin winders.  One set up for Bottom Line (tex 23) the other set up for tex 40 thread. 
     
    While the cost of an M bobbin case is higher than the cost of L, really how many bobbin cases do you buy?  I have the original Haya bobbin case I bought when I did the system conversion five years ago, set up for Bottom Line, and a second Towa bobbin case I bought three years ago set up for tex 40 thread.  Both work fine, and neither has worn out.  I don't remember what I paid for the Haya, but the Towa, which would be my choice of bobbin cases, cost me $41. 
     
    As far as I'm concerned, I wouldn't even consider a machine with an L bobbin system.  To me there is no "up side" to the L, only "down side".  I hope my experience helps you with your decision.  Jim
  9. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Reetmomma in SOLD!!!! 2005 APQS Millenium for sale $6,000   
    Rita:  I can't give you a firm number, but I do know that Dave Jones moves a lot of them across the country, and I think he charges between $500 -$800.  I believe he schedules the moves along with his service calls, so you might have to wait a bit on him, but I'm sure he does a great job.  Look at some of the other posts here and get his contact ID or number and get in touch with him.  Jim
  10. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from delld in What Did I Do With My Quilting Excitement   
    David:  Been there done that.  You need to walk away from the quilting a while.  Relax, do other things, do nothing.  Pretty soon the desire to quilt will re-appear.  You might pick up the quilt and do one applique, or not.  I don't think it will be ready for the guild meeting.  Jim
  11. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in question   
    Quilters block?  lol
  12. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Battynurse in Will I ever be able to quilt?   
    All you'd have to do is loosen the little sheet metal panel that holds it, remove the knob (held with a set screw), remove the attachment screw, cut the red and black wires, wire the new unit in (you could probably do that with wire nuts), and reassemble.  You should be able to do it.  Jim  
    PS:  If you can't get one from APQS, I have the one that came off my machine when we did the Intellistitch upgrade.  You're welcome to it.
  13. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Battynurse in Will I ever be able to quilt?   
    You need to change out the speed control.  It's not working the way it should.  Get a new one from APQS, or source it some where else.  It's simply a reostat that changes the voltage.  Jim
  14. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Marti10245 in Stitch regulator just quit   
    Marti:  Consider this just another lesson in your continuing long arm education.  You've crossed one more maintenance/repair issue.  Each time you have to fix something, you become more self sufficient.  What would be horrible is if you had to throw the machine away and get a replacement each time you encountered a problem.  I for one, am glad APQS makes their machines so that the owners can repair most problems.  It's empowering.  Hope you're up and running soon.  Jim 
  15. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Battynurse in Will I ever be able to quilt?   
    Batty:  You need to hold the top thread and bobbin thread until you've locked them by hand (several manual stitches) before you hit the "go" button.  If you let go of it before it's locked it's like you didn't do it to begin with.  It's tedious, but necessary.
     
    Your speed control doesn't seem to be working properly.  Your machine should stitch from very slowly to very rapidly as you turn the speed control dial.  Remove the bobbin case, unthread the machine (just past the take up lever), and press the "go" button.  Turn the speed control knob from beginning to end and gauge how fast or slow the machine stitches.  If there isn't a great deal of difference, there is something wrong with that control.  Proper speed control will help you get started.  Good luck.  Jim
  16. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from lkl in Stitch regulator just quit   
    Marti:  Consider this just another lesson in your continuing long arm education.  You've crossed one more maintenance/repair issue.  Each time you have to fix something, you become more self sufficient.  What would be horrible is if you had to throw the machine away and get a replacement each time you encountered a problem.  I for one, am glad APQS makes their machines so that the owners can repair most problems.  It's empowering.  Hope you're up and running soon.  Jim 
  17. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from jandcembroidery in Double Batting??   
    Double batting gives higher loft, and better stitch definition.  It also will help take up extra fullness.  Jim
  18. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Battynurse in Will I ever be able to quilt?   
    Batty:  You don't have a single stitch or needle up/down on your Ult 2.  You need to manually cycle the machine in order to pull the bobbin thread up.  Here's how:  With your right hand hold the top tread end, with your left hand rotate the hand wheel clockwise cycling the needle down through the fabric and back up until the take-up lever (and the needle) is nearly to the top of it's movement.  The bobbin thread should come up through the quilt sandwich, pulled by the top thread you're holding.   It will not "release" until you reach the end of the cycle.  Then it should come up easily.  You should have your bobbin in the case so that when you pull the thread, the bobbin rotates clockwise.  You should leave a thread "tail" about 3-5 inches long when you snap your bobbin case into the bobbin basket.
     
    If you cannot get the bobbin thread to pull up after trying this several times. you most likely have a timing problem that must be corrected.  Good luck.  Jim
  19. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Battynurse in Bobbin problems and getting started   
    Batty:  It's a little difficult to tell, but it looks to me like the bobbin case latch is out of place.  It looks like the latch is too far to the left.  Looking at mine (which is an M not an L, but works the same way) my latch tip is further to the right - it extends all the way to the edge of the bobbin case.  The latch slides back and forth as you pull on it ( slides to the left when pulled, and back to the right when released).  The sliding action is what locks it in the bobbin basket.  There is a spring that pushes it back to the right when you release the lever.  If the latch is stuck, it won't snap over the bobbin basket shaft, and won't go all the way in.  Check it out.  Jim
  20. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from monakeegan in Varying Top Tension while Stitching   
    Of course you've completely re-threaded your machine. ( when I was fiddling with mine the other day, got a loop of thread around one of the rear thread guides which gave me a lot to thread tension)  That not being the case, review your hopping foot bar installation.  It sounds as if the timing on the hopping foot might be off, or the bar might be loose.  That probably isn't what's wrong, but since that was the change you made before the problem showed up, it would be good just to make sure.
     
     I've noticed that if the take up spring is misbehaving, I get a small loose stitch on the top thread.  If that's one of your symptoms, make sure the tension assembly is clamped far enough out from the machine so the spring can't touch the head.  Also make sure you're getting a full cycle of the spring (I think it should rest at about the 11 o'clock position)  I set mine at 11:30, but then I've replaced my original tension assembly with a rotary system, so it's a bit different than the original.  Good luck.  Jim
  21. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Fastquilts in Looking for new iron   
    Fastquilts:  Take a look at the gravity feed irons.  The problems you've had with your others will disappear with one of them, I think.  Jim
  22. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Noel in table/wheel upgrade   
    Batty:  Bolts tight, level, roller rack set at the same height on both ends, a "finger" space between the machine bed and the quilt sandwich.  Set up like that should get you started.  Jim
  23. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Battynurse in table/wheel upgrade   
    Batty:  Bolts tight, level, roller rack set at the same height on both ends, a "finger" space between the machine bed and the quilt sandwich.  Set up like that should get you started.  Jim
  24. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Battynurse in table/wheel upgrade   
    Noel:  Are you sure the table is 10 foot?  When I bought mine the seller told me it was a 10' table, turned out it was really 12 foot. The mover was expecting a 10 footer when he went to pick it up, he was surprised,, but I think I can help yo  but that's another story.   I've only seen 12 foorters.  I haven't seen all that many, but nothing other than 12'.
     
    As far as the wheels go, Edgeriders are the after market option.  I've heard that Kasa Engineering is no longer making them.  If that's so, You'll have to do some improvising.  Let me know.  I think I can help you there if you'd like.
     
    I was told by Helen B when she installed my Intellistitch, that IQ is/was available for the Ult2 with wooden table.  Does your's already have the intellistitch upgrade?  I believe the Intelliquilt installation requires the I/S.  I've also heard that Kasa is no longer doing Intellistitch up grades.  If that's so, and you don't have the I/S on your Ult2, you'll probably have to get a different machine.
     
    How handy are you?  There's nothing wrong with the wooden table, but there are some things you can do to make it better.
     
    After you consider all this, if you still think you want to go ahead with your Ult2, let me know and I'll be happy to offer advise on the wheels, and the table.  I'm really happy with mine.  She doesn't have I/Q, but she's got almost everything else.  I'd have to think long and hard before I'd replace her with a different machine.  Regards.  Jim
  25. Upvote
    jimerickson got a reaction from Michelle Baker in Stitch Length?????   
    I like the looks of the long stitches (8 spi or less), but if you do short radius curves, the long stitch makes the curve look broken.  I generally stitch either 10 spi, or 12 spi.  Jim