Jump to content

ffq-lar

Member
  • Content Count

    10,549
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    277

Reputation Activity

  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Cutting Off a Customer?   
    Now she knows that she needs to piece better and you know what to look for. I agree it's all her work and not yours so don't be concerned it will mar your reputation. Don't help her and don't hover unless you're concerned about her damaging your machine. If she asks for advice, be generous, but you aren't hired to give piecing lessons. Nor are you hired to give her quilting lessons, I suppose---just to show the mechanics and stand back. One of two things will happen if she continues to be a customer---she'll improve her piecing and have nice flat quilts, or she won't improve and become discouraged because her quilts have so many flaws (and probably stop coming). I'm betting on the former! Who isn't entranced by a nicely quilted quilt that one makes from start to finish? You may eventually lose her anyway when/if she decides to buy her own longarm!
  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in SID on a large quilt   
    If you plan to do all SID first, start in the center. That's where the most fullness will live and where the eye focuses first, so it needs to be flat and symmetrical. The big issue with this is what happens to the rest of the quilt when you start in the middle. You'll need to float it, so secure the top edge of the top with pins (don't stitch it down because you may need to re-position it later). Then advance to the center, smoothing as you advance. When you reach the center, adjust so it's symmetrical then stitch baste or pin baste horizontally above and below the center. Then baste the entire top, stepping out from the center and keeping areas straight and flat. You will immediately see where else there is fullness and needing extra care. I've quilted over twenty Judy Niemeyer quilts as a pro, and none of them was flat---ever. With it fully basted, you can start anywhere you like, but I'd do the center first. Also, you aren't stuck with doing all the SID first if it involves a lot of thread color changes. You can SID and custom quilt a section at a time. The photo is my latest---Dinnerplate Dahlia. Good luck and have fun!

  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Plumpurple in SID on a large quilt   
    If you plan to do all SID first, start in the center. That's where the most fullness will live and where the eye focuses first, so it needs to be flat and symmetrical. The big issue with this is what happens to the rest of the quilt when you start in the middle. You'll need to float it, so secure the top edge of the top with pins (don't stitch it down because you may need to re-position it later). Then advance to the center, smoothing as you advance. When you reach the center, adjust so it's symmetrical then stitch baste or pin baste horizontally above and below the center. Then baste the entire top, stepping out from the center and keeping areas straight and flat. You will immediately see where else there is fullness and needing extra care. I've quilted over twenty Judy Niemeyer quilts as a pro, and none of them was flat---ever. With it fully basted, you can start anywhere you like, but I'd do the center first. Also, you aren't stuck with doing all the SID first if it involves a lot of thread color changes. You can SID and custom quilt a section at a time. The photo is my latest---Dinnerplate Dahlia. Good luck and have fun!

  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from RunningThreads in SID on a large quilt   
    If you plan to do all SID first, start in the center. That's where the most fullness will live and where the eye focuses first, so it needs to be flat and symmetrical. The big issue with this is what happens to the rest of the quilt when you start in the middle. You'll need to float it, so secure the top edge of the top with pins (don't stitch it down because you may need to re-position it later). Then advance to the center, smoothing as you advance. When you reach the center, adjust so it's symmetrical then stitch baste or pin baste horizontally above and below the center. Then baste the entire top, stepping out from the center and keeping areas straight and flat. You will immediately see where else there is fullness and needing extra care. I've quilted over twenty Judy Niemeyer quilts as a pro, and none of them was flat---ever. With it fully basted, you can start anywhere you like, but I'd do the center first. Also, you aren't stuck with doing all the SID first if it involves a lot of thread color changes. You can SID and custom quilt a section at a time. The photo is my latest---Dinnerplate Dahlia. Good luck and have fun!

  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in SID on a large quilt   
    If you plan to do all SID first, start in the center. That's where the most fullness will live and where the eye focuses first, so it needs to be flat and symmetrical. The big issue with this is what happens to the rest of the quilt when you start in the middle. You'll need to float it, so secure the top edge of the top with pins (don't stitch it down because you may need to re-position it later). Then advance to the center, smoothing as you advance. When you reach the center, adjust so it's symmetrical then stitch baste or pin baste horizontally above and below the center. Then baste the entire top, stepping out from the center and keeping areas straight and flat. You will immediately see where else there is fullness and needing extra care. I've quilted over twenty Judy Niemeyer quilts as a pro, and none of them was flat---ever. With it fully basted, you can start anywhere you like, but I'd do the center first. Also, you aren't stuck with doing all the SID first if it involves a lot of thread color changes. You can SID and custom quilt a section at a time. The photo is my latest---Dinnerplate Dahlia. Good luck and have fun!

  6. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in SID on a large quilt   
    If you plan to do all SID first, start in the center. That's where the most fullness will live and where the eye focuses first, so it needs to be flat and symmetrical. The big issue with this is what happens to the rest of the quilt when you start in the middle. You'll need to float it, so secure the top edge of the top with pins (don't stitch it down because you may need to re-position it later). Then advance to the center, smoothing as you advance. When you reach the center, adjust so it's symmetrical then stitch baste or pin baste horizontally above and below the center. Then baste the entire top, stepping out from the center and keeping areas straight and flat. You will immediately see where else there is fullness and needing extra care. I've quilted over twenty Judy Niemeyer quilts as a pro, and none of them was flat---ever. With it fully basted, you can start anywhere you like, but I'd do the center first. Also, you aren't stuck with doing all the SID first if it involves a lot of thread color changes. You can SID and custom quilt a section at a time. The photo is my latest---Dinnerplate Dahlia. Good luck and have fun!

  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Bobbin case   
    You won't want to force it, but can you rock the hand wheel at all? Remove the needle in case that's part of the problem. Spray some WD-40 all over the case and remove the needle plate to spray from the top, to ease things along. If it's a thread snarl stopping things, a soak overnight might help soften things up.  Last solution---remove the bobbin assembly completely. That will require retiming, but may be the last resort. The jammed bobbin case will be much easier to work on outside the machine. Good luck!
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Embroidery patches on a quilt or pillow   
    Here's a quilt with many National Park patches that travels with the couple in their RV. She sewed them down (I think she said she used a Featherweight) and I couldn't stitch on them with my Millie, but I echoed them once. If it will be a wallhanging, use a heavyweight double-sided fusible to attach them if they're too thick to stitch down.

  9. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Bobbin case   
    You won't want to force it, but can you rock the hand wheel at all? Remove the needle in case that's part of the problem. Spray some WD-40 all over the case and remove the needle plate to spray from the top, to ease things along. If it's a thread snarl stopping things, a soak overnight might help soften things up.  Last solution---remove the bobbin assembly completely. That will require retiming, but may be the last resort. The jammed bobbin case will be much easier to work on outside the machine. Good luck!
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from harcathy in 2010 Millennium 12’ many extras   
    Caution *****It looks like Dave has re-registered on this site. This seller is Dave Jones, who has a bad reputation in the industry. He had a good gig buying and selling longarms and doing deliveries/set/up between buyers and sellers. But several deals went sour and caused a loss of reputation for him. Be very careful and make sure you pay AFTER delivery and not before.
  11. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in 2010 Millennium 12’ many extras   
    Caution *****It looks like Dave has re-registered on this site. This seller is Dave Jones, who has a bad reputation in the industry. He had a good gig buying and selling longarms and doing deliveries/set/up between buyers and sellers. But several deals went sour and caused a loss of reputation for him. Be very careful and make sure you pay AFTER delivery and not before.
  12. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in 2010 Millennium 12’ many extras   
    Caution *****It looks like Dave has re-registered on this site. This seller is Dave Jones, who has a bad reputation in the industry. He had a good gig buying and selling longarms and doing deliveries/set/up between buyers and sellers. But several deals went sour and caused a loss of reputation for him. Be very careful and make sure you pay AFTER delivery and not before.
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from RunningThreads in 2010 Millennium 12’ many extras   
    Caution *****It looks like Dave has re-registered on this site. This seller is Dave Jones, who has a bad reputation in the industry. He had a good gig buying and selling longarms and doing deliveries/set/up between buyers and sellers. But several deals went sour and caused a loss of reputation for him. Be very careful and make sure you pay AFTER delivery and not before.
  14. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Ruler Quilting with Texas Hold Em Bracket - How do you keep your ruler base from hitting your side clamps?   
    To make-do until a more elegant solution comes along, elevate the front part of the rod/yardstick by the width of your roller, which is 2". Glue up layers of cardboard or cut a piece of wood into a block that is 2" high.  Make two and fasten them (glue, tape, whatever) to the underside of the front part of the rod. Position so the blocks sit right on top of the front roller. If you want to get fancy, line them with rubberized shelf liner or a cut-up rubber glove so they are less likely to slip. Good luck! 
  15. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in M & M wheels   
    The black flakes are oxidation from the aluminum carriage base, not material from the wheels. Not to say you don't need to replace them, but mine have had steady business-use daily for 9 years and so far no problems. The diagonal stitching can be tested by freehanding a big circle, slowly. If you feel drag all four of the diagonal sections and none at the horizontal/vertical, then you can investigate more. Wheels too tight and drag from your power cord can be looked at. Also, if you're stitching diagonals with a ruler, that, of course, can cause drag. But a freehand diagonal line will have a bit more drag because you are overcoming the natural ease of stitching an x/y axis. The machine WANTS to go horizontal or vertical and diagonals take more control and more of a push. If this is a really new problem, call APQS service or your dealer to troubleshoot. Good luck!
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Roadshow   
    Contact your nearest dealer. They will be helpful and are a good source to cultivate for repairs and questions.
  17. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in On the Towa what setting do you use for your bobbins?   
    Your tension is too high---try 180 and loosen the top tension as well. You only need it tight enough to make nice stitches---tighter is definitely not better. I set at 180 for 50 wt and 60 wt thread and 150 for Microquilter (100 wt) and invisible. Match your top tension to your bobbin tension. Test-stitch on a sample to find the sweet spots where stitches are balanced. When you get good stitches with a certain combo, pull the top thread through the needle and to the left. See how much your tension spring deflects. Make a chart that with X top thread and Y bobbin thread, the spring deflects from 10 o'clock/resting to 9 o'clock pulled---or whatever. Eventually you'll get a feel for how hard it is to pull the top thread. Your small backside stitches may be cured or there may be something else going on. Tiny stitches can be a stitch-regulator problem or if you're using a ruler, you're pressing too hard. Good luck!
  18. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Embroidery patches on a quilt or pillow   
    Here's a quilt with many National Park patches that travels with the couple in their RV. She sewed them down (I think she said she used a Featherweight) and I couldn't stitch on them with my Millie, but I echoed them once. If it will be a wallhanging, use a heavyweight double-sided fusible to attach them if they're too thick to stitch down.

  19. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in SOLD ! :) APQS Millenium for Sale - Southern Ontario   
    Nosy me wanted to help your sale (what a great price!) by noting that this is a "Green Millennium". Those are traded-in machines that are gone over completely at APQS, worn parts replaced, spiffed up, everything checked out, etc. So while the age of the body and some parts is 20 years, and seeing that she had a recent spa treatment, it's lots better than a used machine of the same vintage that hasn't had that treatment. Good luck with your sale!
  20. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in SCORE: vintage handkerchiefs   
    Hi Nancy Jo! Use Retro Clean to soak the hankies. It's not expensive and easy to find. It takes hot water and if there are heavy stains, more than one treatment. Works like a charm! If you haven't seen (Quilting Vintage) on Facebook, join to see lots of projects and advice for backing and stabilizing the hankies for use in quilts. Fun!
  21. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in SCORE: vintage handkerchiefs   
    Hi Nancy Jo! Use Retro Clean to soak the hankies. It's not expensive and easy to find. It takes hot water and if there are heavy stains, more than one treatment. Works like a charm! If you haven't seen (Quilting Vintage) on Facebook, join to see lots of projects and advice for backing and stabilizing the hankies for use in quilts. Fun!
  22. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Bobbin case stuck in Millennium   
    If Jim's suggestion didn't solve the problem, the case is jammed probably because there is thread snarled around the spindle. If you advance the hand wheel, does the needle go up and down? Can you see any stray thread in the area? Before deciding to remove the bobbin assembly (which might be a last resort) do a saturation with WD-40. Remove the needle plate and the needle so you can spray from all directions, put down a cloth to catch dips, and spray from the top and from the front. If the hand wheel moves, advance a couple of turns and re-spray. If it doesn't, try to rock it so you can get the WD-40 dispersed. That solvent will soften the thread---sometimes it takes a couple of hours and some re-application. All you need is enough threads to soften and snap so you can get the case out. Then remove any threads left in the bobbin assembly area and in the case. Check the case for round--it may be warped, depending on how forceful you need to be to get it out. Good luck!
  23. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in 2008 APQS Millie For Sale 12 ft Table - Indiana--SOLD!!   
    I will point out that this is a "green Millennium" which is a kind of hybrid that was developed by APQS. They would take a traded-in Ultimate machine, strip it and rebuild with the same components as a regular Millennium, selling them for about $3000 less than a new Millie. Old components that were the same as the new Millies were kept,  but electronics and SR added. The Ultimates were prior to 2000 and the Millennium after 2000. Not that it matters, since you have it priced attractively, but you don't want a buyer to claim that the year of manufacture was incorrect if you don't point out the history or maybe weren't aware of it. I believe APQS was doing this starting in 2005 but I may be wrong. Good luck with your sale---great price and someone will be so happy to get this!  Here's a link to answers from 2005. https://forum.apqs.com/topic/999-green-milli-and-freedom-sr/
     
  24. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in thread jam in hook assembly   
    You are doing the right thing. Douse it again with WD-40 and let it sit for a while. That will soften the thread even more. Continue to pull out the visible threads with tweezers and try to rock the assembly manually. If necessary, douse again and let it sit overnight, keep working, and you should be able to loosen things up. When the assembly turns, start it at a slow speed to twirl out any thread that's left.  Make sure you haven't blown a fuse with the jam. Wipe out and re-oil well with machine oil. Good luck, Jacque.
  25. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Broke needle   
    Hi new owner! Please stop everything until you can figure this out. You're hitting something (obviously) and need to remedy that before you gouge your hook assembly so badly that it will need to be replaced. The broken needle probably jammed your needle bar and now you may need to retime. The first step in timing is to check your needle depth at its lowest point. Sometimes adjusting the out-of-place needle bar is all you need to do. Videos are on-line and printed instructions for retiming are in the manual--it looks daunting but is pretty straightforward. And doing it correctly is a great confidence booster.  You said you were basting down the side---towards you?  Probably the needle jam displaced the needle bar enough so that stitching towards the front made the needle flex into the hook. Check the hook for gouges or burrs caused by the needle hitting it, which can be buffed out by following the instructions from APQS. If the hook assembly is too damaged to work (you'll have bad stitches and breaking thread) it will need to be replaced. It all sounds like gloom and doom, but it's just a matter of knowing where to look and everything is repairable---most repairs you can do yourself. I wish you much good luck in getting to know your machine. You'll be a pro in no time.
×
×
  • Create New...