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ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in Need help on Design   
    To advance your skills and give you confidence, quilt the diagonal sashings and the squares with easy designs. Find a thread color that will work on all your fabrics and use it throughout. For the sashing, evenly-spaced up/down loops would work. Make sure there's a loop in every spot where the sashings intersect. Stitch all in one direction. Then when you do the ones in the other direction you will overstitch one side of a loop to reach across to the next sashing section. For the HST blocks in between, treat them as squares instead of triangles. If you have a stencil that fits, mark and stitch the same design in each square. If the stencil is too small, mark and stitch it then echo the outside until the block is filled. Another option in the squares is CCs/Line Dancing. Because the blocks are large you'll really be able to see your designs. Here's a link to Line Dancing by Diana Philips. You can get the idea and practice on some graph paper to give you the rhythm. Share when you finish and have fun!
    https://www.google.com/search?q=Diana+phillips+line+dancing&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=1067&tbm=isch&imgil=0-c4PLA0qkrwpM%253A%253B1gNJIA6BpnQ21M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.intelligentquilting.com%25252F 
  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Enchanted Quilting in Need help on Design   
    To advance your skills and give you confidence, quilt the diagonal sashings and the squares with easy designs. Find a thread color that will work on all your fabrics and use it throughout. For the sashing, evenly-spaced up/down loops would work. Make sure there's a loop in every spot where the sashings intersect. Stitch all in one direction. Then when you do the ones in the other direction you will overstitch one side of a loop to reach across to the next sashing section. For the HST blocks in between, treat them as squares instead of triangles. If you have a stencil that fits, mark and stitch the same design in each square. If the stencil is too small, mark and stitch it then echo the outside until the block is filled. Another option in the squares is CCs/Line Dancing. Because the blocks are large you'll really be able to see your designs. Here's a link to Line Dancing by Diana Philips. You can get the idea and practice on some graph paper to give you the rhythm. Share when you finish and have fun!
    https://www.google.com/search?q=Diana+phillips+line+dancing&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=1067&tbm=isch&imgil=0-c4PLA0qkrwpM%253A%253B1gNJIA6BpnQ21M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.intelligentquilting.com%25252F 
  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from fallenfar in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to CindyT in Just a simple Snowman/Penguin quilt from a panel   
    I haven't had much time to piece this year, but I did manage to finish this UFO from a few years ago.  I took a class through our guild on sashings, and decided to try using the ruler I bought on the panel these blocks came from.  Pretty happy little quilt with all over quilting, but nothing fancy.  It's hanging in my studio for now.


  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to Gail O in NQR - Happy Holidays   
    Before things get too hectic . . . .
     
    Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, safe travels, and may your future be filled with joy and laughter.
  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Leida Glez in quilt patch update motor. Pantograph   
    I believe there is a Facebook group for Quilt Path owners which is very helpful and questions are answered quickly. Someone in the group will need to share a link and invitation for you to join.
  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from anniemueller in Can you float a quilt back? or How do you deal with non-straight edges   
    Wow. I'm with Lynn on this one.  
     
    Here's a thought, though. You can place the quilt top anywhere on the backer that works. If someone gives me a backer that is way larger than the top, I load the top as far to one side as I can an still have enough at that edge for my clamps. That may mean that the excess backer on one side is 3" and the opposite 12". This option saves fabric and might leave her enough fabric for binding something. 
     
    As for your diagram--I agree that you might want to load it the recommended way with the seam parallel to the rollers. Snug the top to one side as close to the backer edge as you're comfortable. That way she'll have as much usable fabric as possible left when you finish. Charge her $10 for this awkward load because if you load it with the backer seam horizontal, you'll need to take some care to make sure the excess backer is out of the way (if it hangs down it can be run over by your wheels and leave nasty marks) or it can unroll wonky and you will have issues controlling the side tension. If you load the backer with the seam vertical, you'll want to mark straight across both widths of fabric to have a line to pin to the rollers. You'll still be dealing with that extra flap of fabric and need to keep it from getting in the way.
     
    As for adding a strip of muslin to even up the backer--let her do this. Industry standard is $10 per seam for piecing backers. I can't imagine she wants to pay an extra $20 to save some precious inches of fabric. Sheeeesh! 
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from celinedum2004 in colored wholecloth   
    Pre-printed wholecloth designs are usually offered on white or cream fabric, as you've found out. An option would be to purchase a paper pattern that you then transfer the design yourself to your chosen fabric. You will need a lightbox with a strong enough light to show through the fabric. Darkening the design with a Sharpie can help with the tracing. Use a blue water-erase pen for the marking so the lines don't fade. Then after quilting the marks are soaked to remove. That's quite a hand-quilting project---I love the French boutis quilts. Usually made of one fabric and beautiful!
  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Marti10245 in Can you float a quilt back? or How do you deal with non-straight edges   
    Wow. I'm with Lynn on this one.  
     
    Here's a thought, though. You can place the quilt top anywhere on the backer that works. If someone gives me a backer that is way larger than the top, I load the top as far to one side as I can an still have enough at that edge for my clamps. That may mean that the excess backer on one side is 3" and the opposite 12". This option saves fabric and might leave her enough fabric for binding something. 
     
    As for your diagram--I agree that you might want to load it the recommended way with the seam parallel to the rollers. Snug the top to one side as close to the backer edge as you're comfortable. That way she'll have as much usable fabric as possible left when you finish. Charge her $10 for this awkward load because if you load it with the backer seam horizontal, you'll need to take some care to make sure the excess backer is out of the way (if it hangs down it can be run over by your wheels and leave nasty marks) or it can unroll wonky and you will have issues controlling the side tension. If you load the backer with the seam vertical, you'll want to mark straight across both widths of fabric to have a line to pin to the rollers. You'll still be dealing with that extra flap of fabric and need to keep it from getting in the way.
     
    As for adding a strip of muslin to even up the backer--let her do this. Industry standard is $10 per seam for piecing backers. I can't imagine she wants to pay an extra $20 to save some precious inches of fabric. Sheeeesh! 
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from GMALKB in Can you float a quilt back? or How do you deal with non-straight edges   
    Wow. I'm with Lynn on this one.  
     
    Here's a thought, though. You can place the quilt top anywhere on the backer that works. If someone gives me a backer that is way larger than the top, I load the top as far to one side as I can an still have enough at that edge for my clamps. That may mean that the excess backer on one side is 3" and the opposite 12". This option saves fabric and might leave her enough fabric for binding something. 
     
    As for your diagram--I agree that you might want to load it the recommended way with the seam parallel to the rollers. Snug the top to one side as close to the backer edge as you're comfortable. That way she'll have as much usable fabric as possible left when you finish. Charge her $10 for this awkward load because if you load it with the backer seam horizontal, you'll need to take some care to make sure the excess backer is out of the way (if it hangs down it can be run over by your wheels and leave nasty marks) or it can unroll wonky and you will have issues controlling the side tension. If you load the backer with the seam vertical, you'll want to mark straight across both widths of fabric to have a line to pin to the rollers. You'll still be dealing with that extra flap of fabric and need to keep it from getting in the way.
     
    As for adding a strip of muslin to even up the backer--let her do this. Industry standard is $10 per seam for piecing backers. I can't imagine she wants to pay an extra $20 to save some precious inches of fabric. Sheeeesh! 
  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Enchanted Quilting in Can you float a quilt back? or How do you deal with non-straight edges   
    Wow. I'm with Lynn on this one.  
     
    Here's a thought, though. You can place the quilt top anywhere on the backer that works. If someone gives me a backer that is way larger than the top, I load the top as far to one side as I can an still have enough at that edge for my clamps. That may mean that the excess backer on one side is 3" and the opposite 12". This option saves fabric and might leave her enough fabric for binding something. 
     
    As for your diagram--I agree that you might want to load it the recommended way with the seam parallel to the rollers. Snug the top to one side as close to the backer edge as you're comfortable. That way she'll have as much usable fabric as possible left when you finish. Charge her $10 for this awkward load because if you load it with the backer seam horizontal, you'll need to take some care to make sure the excess backer is out of the way (if it hangs down it can be run over by your wheels and leave nasty marks) or it can unroll wonky and you will have issues controlling the side tension. If you load the backer with the seam vertical, you'll want to mark straight across both widths of fabric to have a line to pin to the rollers. You'll still be dealing with that extra flap of fabric and need to keep it from getting in the way.
     
    As for adding a strip of muslin to even up the backer--let her do this. Industry standard is $10 per seam for piecing backers. I can't imagine she wants to pay an extra $20 to save some precious inches of fabric. Sheeeesh! 
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Debi in Can you float a quilt back? or How do you deal with non-straight edges   
    Wow. I'm with Lynn on this one.  
     
    Here's a thought, though. You can place the quilt top anywhere on the backer that works. If someone gives me a backer that is way larger than the top, I load the top as far to one side as I can an still have enough at that edge for my clamps. That may mean that the excess backer on one side is 3" and the opposite 12". This option saves fabric and might leave her enough fabric for binding something. 
     
    As for your diagram--I agree that you might want to load it the recommended way with the seam parallel to the rollers. Snug the top to one side as close to the backer edge as you're comfortable. That way she'll have as much usable fabric as possible left when you finish. Charge her $10 for this awkward load because if you load it with the backer seam horizontal, you'll need to take some care to make sure the excess backer is out of the way (if it hangs down it can be run over by your wheels and leave nasty marks) or it can unroll wonky and you will have issues controlling the side tension. If you load the backer with the seam vertical, you'll want to mark straight across both widths of fabric to have a line to pin to the rollers. You'll still be dealing with that extra flap of fabric and need to keep it from getting in the way.
     
    As for adding a strip of muslin to even up the backer--let her do this. Industry standard is $10 per seam for piecing backers. I can't imagine she wants to pay an extra $20 to save some precious inches of fabric. Sheeeesh! 
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to Zora in Can you float a quilt back? or How do you deal with non-straight edges   
    Just because somebody somewhere did something ridiculous successfully once does not mean I have to try it. I would give it back and tell her to either choose another backing or even up that one in whatever way SHE chose..and let
    HER figure it out. My prices are not calculated for the aggravating and unrealistic requests of my customers. She could save every inch of her precious fabric by choosing something else.
  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Leida Glez in Batting with or without scrim   
    The only area that's crucial is between the backer and the batting next to it, so I make sure the bottom batting is properly positioned. Your pieces are more prone to the dreaded batting pokies if the batting is wrong side up. That's why with cotton batting you want the needlepunched holes in the batt to be going the same direction as your machine needle---from top to bottom. The needlepunching aligns the cotton fibers and if you stitch against the "grain" you'll catch small bits of batting with the high-speed needle and poke them out the back.  
    Chemical scrims will be next to the backer to stop and contain batting bits that might want to punch through the backer and appear outside the fabric. Been there-done that way to many times and now I check very carefully when the batting is laid onto the backer. As for double batts, most quilters use cotton against the backer and either wool or poly on top. The cotton stabilizes the piece and adds weight so it hangs well. The wool or poly give great definition to your quilting and poofs even with dense stitching. So the cotton batting needs to be placed correctly, though I place each of them as if I were using only one, just to be safe. Usually wool is my top batting on doubles, and the brand I use is even and has a "finished" feel on both sides so I can't tell them apart. If there is a difference, I put the finished-feeling side down.
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from gardenslug in Batting with or without scrim   
    The only area that's crucial is between the backer and the batting next to it, so I make sure the bottom batting is properly positioned. Your pieces are more prone to the dreaded batting pokies if the batting is wrong side up. That's why with cotton batting you want the needlepunched holes in the batt to be going the same direction as your machine needle---from top to bottom. The needlepunching aligns the cotton fibers and if you stitch against the "grain" you'll catch small bits of batting with the high-speed needle and poke them out the back.  
    Chemical scrims will be next to the backer to stop and contain batting bits that might want to punch through the backer and appear outside the fabric. Been there-done that way to many times and now I check very carefully when the batting is laid onto the backer. As for double batts, most quilters use cotton against the backer and either wool or poly on top. The cotton stabilizes the piece and adds weight so it hangs well. The wool or poly give great definition to your quilting and poofs even with dense stitching. So the cotton batting needs to be placed correctly, though I place each of them as if I were using only one, just to be safe. Usually wool is my top batting on doubles, and the brand I use is even and has a "finished" feel on both sides so I can't tell them apart. If there is a difference, I put the finished-feeling side down.
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Regina in Batting with or without scrim   
    The only area that's crucial is between the backer and the batting next to it, so I make sure the bottom batting is properly positioned. Your pieces are more prone to the dreaded batting pokies if the batting is wrong side up. That's why with cotton batting you want the needlepunched holes in the batt to be going the same direction as your machine needle---from top to bottom. The needlepunching aligns the cotton fibers and if you stitch against the "grain" you'll catch small bits of batting with the high-speed needle and poke them out the back.  
    Chemical scrims will be next to the backer to stop and contain batting bits that might want to punch through the backer and appear outside the fabric. Been there-done that way to many times and now I check very carefully when the batting is laid onto the backer. As for double batts, most quilters use cotton against the backer and either wool or poly on top. The cotton stabilizes the piece and adds weight so it hangs well. The wool or poly give great definition to your quilting and poofs even with dense stitching. So the cotton batting needs to be placed correctly, though I place each of them as if I were using only one, just to be safe. Usually wool is my top batting on doubles, and the brand I use is even and has a "finished" feel on both sides so I can't tell them apart. If there is a difference, I put the finished-feeling side down.
  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from judyday in Batting with or without scrim   
    The only area that's crucial is between the backer and the batting next to it, so I make sure the bottom batting is properly positioned. Your pieces are more prone to the dreaded batting pokies if the batting is wrong side up. That's why with cotton batting you want the needlepunched holes in the batt to be going the same direction as your machine needle---from top to bottom. The needlepunching aligns the cotton fibers and if you stitch against the "grain" you'll catch small bits of batting with the high-speed needle and poke them out the back.  
    Chemical scrims will be next to the backer to stop and contain batting bits that might want to punch through the backer and appear outside the fabric. Been there-done that way to many times and now I check very carefully when the batting is laid onto the backer. As for double batts, most quilters use cotton against the backer and either wool or poly on top. The cotton stabilizes the piece and adds weight so it hangs well. The wool or poly give great definition to your quilting and poofs even with dense stitching. So the cotton batting needs to be placed correctly, though I place each of them as if I were using only one, just to be safe. Usually wool is my top batting on doubles, and the brand I use is even and has a "finished" feel on both sides so I can't tell them apart. If there is a difference, I put the finished-feeling side down.
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Leida Glez in Batting with or without scrim   
    For longarming, batting with scrim is the best. The scrim allows tugging and adjusting of the batting without tearing a hole or causing bunching. Cotton batts usually have a thin poly "film" in the center and the fibers are needlepunched through the film to stabilize the fibers and give an even layer. Your package of cotton batting may say 100% cotton but if you read the fine print it will add 3% polyester---which is the scrim layer. Poly batting may have a "glaze" or chemical scrim on one side. That's the side that lays against the backer and you can feel it.  I don't accept non-scrimmed batting from my customers and have a sign posted stating which battings are not acceptable on the longarm. You'll learn which types you love and which you like to stay away from.
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from delld in Batting with or without scrim   
    For longarming, batting with scrim is the best. The scrim allows tugging and adjusting of the batting without tearing a hole or causing bunching. Cotton batts usually have a thin poly "film" in the center and the fibers are needlepunched through the film to stabilize the fibers and give an even layer. Your package of cotton batting may say 100% cotton but if you read the fine print it will add 3% polyester---which is the scrim layer. Poly batting may have a "glaze" or chemical scrim on one side. That's the side that lays against the backer and you can feel it.  I don't accept non-scrimmed batting from my customers and have a sign posted stating which battings are not acceptable on the longarm. You'll learn which types you love and which you like to stay away from.
  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to delld in Pineapples   
    My SIL bought these blocks at Quilt Fest in Jax. They were a UFO. She put them together and added the borders and I got to quilt it this week. All freehand and ruler work. Used Filtec Bobbins, Magnifico and Glide thread on top. Thanks for looking. Debbie will pick it up tomorrow. She loved the photos I sent her.
     
    20151217_171220 by Dell Dunman, on Flickr
     
    20151217_171215 by Dell Dunman, on Flickr
     
    20151217_171229 by Dell Dunman, on Flickr
     
    20151217_171235 by Dell Dunman, on Flickr
  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to yankiequilter in Ribbons and awards from guild show   
    I am almost embarrassed but am sharing because I like to hear when someone has success and thought you might also. I entered 7 quilts in my guild's show and won with all of them.  There were 285 entries and we had an NQA judge for the show.

    Summer Salsa and Gooseberry Garden won honorable mention.
    The Farmer's Wife won second place.
    Diamonds are Forever, Bittersweet Too, Starry Burst and Minglewood Autumn won first place.

    If that wasn't enough excitement I also won four awards. Best use of color with Diamonds are Forever, best representation of theme (Autumn in the Ozarks) with Bittersweet Too, best professional quilting with Gooseberry Garden, best technical skills with Minglewood Autumn, which also won best of show. My heart is pounding all over again just writing about it!

    I used Quilt Path on all of the quilts, along with SID and stitching around applique where appropriate, and very little free motion. Quilt Path is a winner!
     
    Goos​eberry Garden was my first experience quilting around applique and curved crosshatch.  A big thanks to Linda Rech for her curved crosshatch rulers and explaining how to use them.  The quilt, along with Bittersweet Too, sold at the show!  WooHoo!

    Thanks for looking and sharing my excitement.










  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from allmorgretmarsh in cranky mini rant   
    I've noticed an increase in posts involving non-APQS machines for sale. It bothers me quite a lot that the APQS sponsored and maintained forum is used by people with no interest in our forum who are selling items that are in direct competition with the company that sponsors the site.
    I'm all for being friendly and welcoming, but come on! Think about it. I bet anyone from the home office who reads the for-sale posts for a competing machine just cringe. They are in the business of selling APQS products and every machine that sells off this site may be one less that could have been an APQS. 
     
    It's convenient for the seller and someone can be hijacked directly from the site. I know most of the posters are private owners and sometimes they are trying to sell their XYZ machine to upgrade to an APQS. I just think it's inappropriate. It's like someone at a trade show standing in line and handing out their catering business cards while they enjoy the free buffet put on by their competitor. 
     
    I don't imagine anyone will restrict or remove the competing posts, since this place is famously friendly. But there are sites like Longarm U where any brand can be happily offered since there is no vested interest in brand.
     
    Cranky mini-rant over. Continue with your regularly scheduled quilting!
  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from allmorgretmarsh in No more "day job" for Linda!   
    I sit here with my coffee on the first day of my retirement from my day job. The feeling is wonderful!
     
    My calendar for the next few months is full of fun---a trip to Disneyland with my sister, guild volunteering, Moxies at my house, the local Arts Walk, the list goes on. On the business side, for the first time in six months I will be caught up on my monthly quilt quota. I try for 6 quilts a month and I've been one quilt behind every month for a while!  I'm busier than ever and need to get better organized--as usual--so I can pencil in some piecing and retreats!
     
    I was treated to a tear-producing farewell at work. They called former co-workers who I haven't seen for years to come to a get together after my last shift. The people are what I will miss the most!
     
    My job provided me with good pay, great benefits, nice people to work with, and allowed me to have the $$ and time to following a modest dream. For that I'll always be thankful. But I'm glad to move on.
     
    Let the fun begin!!
     
     
     
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from allmorgretmarsh in Brown, cream, purple quilt--pics of back added--feathers and scrolls   
    Here's the latest finish. The odd spaces required some stand-and-stare. Feathers on the border and on the light fabrics. Scrolls and leaves on the darks. A spot of CCs inside the center HStriangles. So Fine putty color and purple thread on top. She provided W&N cotton batting. Her backer was unbleached muslin. This one, with the thin batting and high contrast in top thread colors required me to use tan bobbins with the light top thread and dark gray with the purple. I still had some trouble balancing the stitches. I'll add a photo of the back later so you can see.
     
    This one partially finished on the frame was my show-and-tell at the latest Moxie meeting. Here it is finished, Moxies!
     
    Thanks for looking!
     
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/larech/14939535873/
     
    Here's a link to photos of the back so you can see the two bobbin thread colors.
     
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/larech/15380633929/
  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from allmorgretmarsh in NQR--Love across borders   
    I'll try to make this short.
    Over ten years ago Dennis (who makes and sells plans for a machine that grinds mirrors for telescopes) was contacted by a young man from Trujillo, Peru who ordered plans so he could make a mirror and then his own telescope.
    Jorge was poor, a student, and eager to learn. Over time they became email buddies and friends.
     
    When Jorge couldn't find a mirror blank (a thick piece of glass which can be ground and polished to use in a telescope) Den found one and sent it to Peru. The corrupt officials need bribes to deliver any items, especially from outside the country and it cost Jorge quite a bit to get the blank. It had been opened and a huge gouge was found on the back. Luckily it didn't affect the other side so Jorge ground his mirror.
     
    While Jorge would be considered middle-class in Peru (his extended family of five shared a three-room mud-brick house with electricity and water) he had trouble saving enough and continuing classes. Dennis would send him money a couple of times a year. I know---red flags! But Jorge sent pictures, small gifts, and it made us feel good that $100 would let the family have some luxuries they couldn't afford. That amount is almost a month's wages in Trujillo.
     
    His girlfriend became pregnant, delivered a little girl, and they named her Linda Nicole. Wow.
    Two years later they added a little boy to their family. Named Dennis.
    We were honored and laughed that we now had grandchildren!
     
    Jorge sent us a link to a youtube today showing little Dennis graduating from Kindergarten and being elected "el Presidente" of his class. So cute! The school system is very structured and the kids wear caps and gowns. We get lots of photos of cultural celebrations with the kids and family.
     
    Jorge asked today if we would consent to being the kids godparents. They're Catholic and it's a serious and sobering commitment in the Church. I guess we really are grandparents!
     
    Just thought I'd share our favorite Christmas story for this year. What a great feeling to connect with people from far away.
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