Jump to content

ffq-lar

Member
  • Content Count

    10,551
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    279

Reputation Activity

  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from allmorgretmarsh in Wish list   
    The longarmers wish list.
     
    A wonderful, well-made and well-supported longarm. *check*
    A warm, dry, cheerful place to put this marvel. *check*
    A group of customers who are talented, creative, generous, and appreciative. *check*
    Another group of "sharers and carers" online who are accessible, giving, encouraging, and friendly. *check*
    Time enough to practice, experiment, and search for innovations. *check*
    A family who "gets it" and appreciates my efforts. *check*
     
    I guess I don't need anything for Christmas this year---I'm living the longarmers dream!
     
  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from allmorgretmarsh in To counter the hurt feelings   
    ***Rules to live by on the forum (my perspective only and not sanctioned by APQS or any other governing body. )***
     
    If you post a photo and ask for quilting design help, and no one replies--don't be discouraged. People are busy. People miss posts. People might have no helpful advice. Princesses might decide they don't want to monopolize the board and allow others to give their advice. You may be a princess yourself and everyone knows you'll figure it out better than they could anyway. Or finally, all one's ideas have been expressed by someone else and all you can do is nod and agree.
     
    If you post a photo of a finished quilt and ask what advice you might get, don't be discouraged if quilters give you that advice. If you say, "how am I doing? I'm very happy with the outcome.", we'll all give you compliments and comment on your progress. Everyone wants to see a new longarmer making progress. But don't ask for advice or a critique (like--what would a better design have been here?) unless you're willing to accept the advice as it was offered.
     
    Post those photos--all are happy to view others work, no matter what the skill level. We aren't stuck in princess mode. If we demean the princesses, they'll stop posting and advising.
     
    Can we please lose the princess thing? It's derogatory in the context which it is used and the only royalty we need here is Queen Dawn!
     
    I'm kicking the soapbox aside and will try to keep a perspective and be generous of those who have hurt feelings. I have had more than my share of emails over the past eight years calling me a show-off or other unkind things. I've also had emails thanking me for some insight or advice that I've given. So--here's a smilie with it's tongue out.   You can't run me off, you can't stop me from sharing, you'll have to take me as I am and I'll do the same for you. I love you all, understand some better than others, and enjoy this forum so much--it's a huge part of my quilting life.
  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Neher-in-law5 in Quilting Around Embroidery Lettering   
    Isolate the lettering by enclosing them with stitching. You can use straight lines or curving "cloud" lines to enclose the quote.The outside margin of the entire quote can be stitched with a perimeter double line and the other lines with a single line horizontally between them. You won't need to stitch between each word. This enclosure will make the quote prominent and give you a boundary for stitching your background filler. The stitching in the interior will anchor the space to keep the area from puffing out or sagging if it's hung.
  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in Quilting Around Embroidery Lettering   
    Isolate the lettering by enclosing them with stitching. You can use straight lines or curving "cloud" lines to enclose the quote.The outside margin of the entire quote can be stitched with a perimeter double line and the other lines with a single line horizontally between them. You won't need to stitch between each word. This enclosure will make the quote prominent and give you a boundary for stitching your background filler. The stitching in the interior will anchor the space to keep the area from puffing out or sagging if it's hung.
  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from fallenfar in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Busy Quilting in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Bonnie in Ok in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dlnewell in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from T Row Studio in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from cegates in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Debi in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from gkazee in Tips to manage batting on frame   
    Just a tiny hint for when you accidentally tug a "peak" in the batting. (Or when the batting somehow has a peak or two straight from the package. ) Lift up the top so you can position the peak within the stitching field. If you can't "pat it out", use sharp scissors to carefully cut an arc in the peak. The curved slit will be "patable" and the batting will again lay flat. You'll have a double laying of batting in a very small area and it will not be noticeable when quilted.
    I also avoid un-scrimmed batting. Too much trouble.
  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from jandcembroidery in wow...the crazy spammers are out.....   
    It was at 30+ pages a while ago and I emailed Dawn. Although she was super busy with a flooded basement, she answered quickly and even more quickly removed the spammers! She's wonderful and the forum is now spam-less!
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in wow...the crazy spammers are out.....   
    It was at 30+ pages a while ago and I emailed Dawn. Although she was super busy with a flooded basement, she answered quickly and even more quickly removed the spammers! She's wonderful and the forum is now spam-less!
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in wow...the crazy spammers are out.....   
    It was at 30+ pages a while ago and I emailed Dawn. Although she was super busy with a flooded basement, she answered quickly and even more quickly removed the spammers! She's wonderful and the forum is now spam-less!
  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from delld in wow...the crazy spammers are out.....   
    It was at 30+ pages a while ago and I emailed Dawn. Although she was super busy with a flooded basement, she answered quickly and even more quickly removed the spammers! She's wonderful and the forum is now spam-less!
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Oma in wow...the crazy spammers are out.....   
    It was at 30+ pages a while ago and I emailed Dawn. Although she was super busy with a flooded basement, she answered quickly and even more quickly removed the spammers! She's wonderful and the forum is now spam-less!
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to DawnCavanaugh in Recent Spam Outbreak   
    Good Morning friends,
     
    So sorry about the recent spam outbreak on the forum this weekend. I have not been on the computer all weekend as I'm dealing with one of those lovely "homeowner moments". Our refrigerator ice maker line decided to spring a leak in our basement.
     
    I have removed all the spam posts I could find, and have banned the perpetrators. If you find any additional posts that I missed, please let me know. Have a great Sunday!
  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Sharonarooni in Tula Pink's butterfly quilt-quilting suggestions   
    Hi Lorrie. I quilted one of these this Fall. Send me an email and I'll forward some photos. There are very few quilted examples on line---I looked long and hard! 
    lindarech@comcast.net
  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Zora in Puckering quilt top when using high loft batting   
    High-loft batting is challenging when using a longarm. I suppose the puckers are because the hopping foot is plowing over the puffy batting and pushing the top fabric ahead of it. You can raise the hopping foot a bit, but many times this will compromise your stitch quality. Options are to raise the hopping foot and adjust your timing to compensate, or you can baste the entire quilt with a four-inch grid to control the pouf and make it easier to quilt. To baste, stitch at the slowest manual speed, set your channel locks, and move across so you make 1/2 inch stitches. You'll be able to move across during the raising of the hopping foot.
  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Wannabelongarm in Need a little bit of encouragement   
    Send her a kind and carefully-worded message, explaining what your plan was and what obstacles are present that make you want to change your quilting plan. Include some photos and ask her how she'd like you to proceed. Unload her quilt and load your QuiltCon entry. Let her know you'll work with her but have a deadline quilt that you need to start and after she (and you) decide what the plan will be, you can re-load and finish her quilt. Not to be too cruel (or cause you to lose a customer), but she doesn't own your time---you do. Even if she was given an estimated finish date, the delays caused by her errors have pushed other projects back and you're allowed to pop her out of line for a finish later. Hope it all works out happily for both of you.
  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Wannabelongarm in top thread breaking   
    Completely unthread the top thread and start from scratch. Sometimes the thread gets a double-wrap around a guide. I somehow got mine wrapped twice around the tension spindle and it took me half a day to find it.
     
    Another hint is when the thread breaks, hold the end and turn the fly wheel to raise the take-up lever. Bring the thread end towards the needle and check where it broke. If it's at or before the needle eye, your problem is on top. Look at your guides for roughness and check that the thread doesn't break easily because of age or defect. Check to see if the thread is flailing out and catching on a something. Put on a thread sock, use all the holes in the three-hole guide above the tensioner, and tighten the top thread a bit if you are experiencing "flailing".
     
    If it breaks below the needle plate hole, you'll be looking for roughness in the needle hole, on the hook, or the hook retaining finger position.
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to nancys13 in top thread breaking   
    Thanks for the help!  I think found it after trying all your ideas.  LInda, it was helpful to try to find out where the breakage happened.  It turned out to be my needle. It must have loosened and slipped a little. When I took it out and put it back in, I made sure it was completely seated.  So far so good!  It appears to have worked!
    thanks again, Nancy
  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from T Row Studio in top thread breaking   
    Completely unthread the top thread and start from scratch. Sometimes the thread gets a double-wrap around a guide. I somehow got mine wrapped twice around the tension spindle and it took me half a day to find it.
     
    Another hint is when the thread breaks, hold the end and turn the fly wheel to raise the take-up lever. Bring the thread end towards the needle and check where it broke. If it's at or before the needle eye, your problem is on top. Look at your guides for roughness and check that the thread doesn't break easily because of age or defect. Check to see if the thread is flailing out and catching on a something. Put on a thread sock, use all the holes in the three-hole guide above the tensioner, and tighten the top thread a bit if you are experiencing "flailing".
     
    If it breaks below the needle plate hole, you'll be looking for roughness in the needle hole, on the hook, or the hook retaining finger position.
×
×
  • Create New...