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ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LeeAnn in Giving it Away   
    Don't be afraid, Debbie! I've been in business since 2005 and do 80-100 customer quilts every year. Ninety nine percent of my customers are gracious, generous, and appreciate the job I do for them for the price I charge. Once a year I'll have a doozey pop up! Just as in every other part of your life, you'll run into people who speak before they think, or try to wheedle a bargain out of you, or realize if they complain about something they might get a discount. For these people, they have found techniques that have been successful and they're willing to try those techniques on everyone. Do not be afraid!! Be forewarned and fore-armed with neutral statements that show you are a professional. For example---
    Her: "My other longarmer doesn't charge for thread." You: "Isn't it great that small businesses like mine are able to set their own rules and prices."
    Her: "I thought there would be more quilting on this for the price you charged." You: "Well, let's look at the intake sheet. When you signed it you agreed to this medium overall design of leaves and swirls. Here on the back is where I demonstrated how far apart the stitching would be for this price-range."
    Her: "Loretta Longarmer said she could quilt this one for $80." You: "Isn't that a great price. All I can say is she and I are not direct competitors. She does only two designs, both large overall designs. What we have discussed is nothing like what she offers."
    Please notice I'm giving you the secret for non-confrontational interaction with difficult customers. The secret is to STOP TALKING. Don't explain. Don't complain. Don't share how/why you charge what you do--that's none of their business so just quote them a price and don't negotiate.
    State the facts/ nothing personal/ all professional/ no negotiations (unless they want to step down the cost with an equal step down in the level of quilting.)
    When you state the facts, STOP TALKING, You'll notice in the scenarios above, at no time do you say "I'm sorry." You don't elaborate or embellish. You don't say why you charge what you do. No mechanic, repair person, or professional ever has to justify what they charge. When you stop short of the explanation/justification the ball is in their court. Very seldom will they continue to press for a discount/freebie.
    And if they do--do what I do. I call it the nod-and-ah. When someone presses for something you have already denied them, tilt your head to the side, nod slightly, and say "Ah". Or "Hmmm." Completely non-committal--just letting them know you've heard them. Don't say anything else. You will watch them become uncomfortable. Nod slightly again and make a little frown. If they continue to press, let them know you have done all the charity quilting you allow for the year and can't give any more discounts. Notice, no "I'm sorry"--just the facts. If they continue to press--even if they're your second customer and you don't know when a third might come along---tell them you two are "not a good fit". You "aren't comfortable" with giving discounts to some people when you can't offer them to all.
    Long-winded--again! My apologies. Opps--never apologize!!
  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Grammy in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Grammy in Giving it Away   
    Don't be afraid, Debbie! I've been in business since 2005 and do 80-100 customer quilts every year. Ninety nine percent of my customers are gracious, generous, and appreciate the job I do for them for the price I charge. Once a year I'll have a doozey pop up! Just as in every other part of your life, you'll run into people who speak before they think, or try to wheedle a bargain out of you, or realize if they complain about something they might get a discount. For these people, they have found techniques that have been successful and they're willing to try those techniques on everyone. Do not be afraid!! Be forewarned and fore-armed with neutral statements that show you are a professional. For example---
    Her: "My other longarmer doesn't charge for thread." You: "Isn't it great that small businesses like mine are able to set their own rules and prices."
    Her: "I thought there would be more quilting on this for the price you charged." You: "Well, let's look at the intake sheet. When you signed it you agreed to this medium overall design of leaves and swirls. Here on the back is where I demonstrated how far apart the stitching would be for this price-range."
    Her: "Loretta Longarmer said she could quilt this one for $80." You: "Isn't that a great price. All I can say is she and I are not direct competitors. She does only two designs, both large overall designs. What we have discussed is nothing like what she offers."
    Please notice I'm giving you the secret for non-confrontational interaction with difficult customers. The secret is to STOP TALKING. Don't explain. Don't complain. Don't share how/why you charge what you do--that's none of their business so just quote them a price and don't negotiate.
    State the facts/ nothing personal/ all professional/ no negotiations (unless they want to step down the cost with an equal step down in the level of quilting.)
    When you state the facts, STOP TALKING, You'll notice in the scenarios above, at no time do you say "I'm sorry." You don't elaborate or embellish. You don't say why you charge what you do. No mechanic, repair person, or professional ever has to justify what they charge. When you stop short of the explanation/justification the ball is in their court. Very seldom will they continue to press for a discount/freebie.
    And if they do--do what I do. I call it the nod-and-ah. When someone presses for something you have already denied them, tilt your head to the side, nod slightly, and say "Ah". Or "Hmmm." Completely non-committal--just letting them know you've heard them. Don't say anything else. You will watch them become uncomfortable. Nod slightly again and make a little frown. If they continue to press, let them know you have done all the charity quilting you allow for the year and can't give any more discounts. Notice, no "I'm sorry"--just the facts. If they continue to press--even if they're your second customer and you don't know when a third might come along---tell them you two are "not a good fit". You "aren't comfortable" with giving discounts to some people when you can't offer them to all.
    Long-winded--again! My apologies. Opps--never apologize!!
  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from lindasewsit in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from lindasewsit in Giving it Away   
    Don't be afraid, Debbie! I've been in business since 2005 and do 80-100 customer quilts every year. Ninety nine percent of my customers are gracious, generous, and appreciate the job I do for them for the price I charge. Once a year I'll have a doozey pop up! Just as in every other part of your life, you'll run into people who speak before they think, or try to wheedle a bargain out of you, or realize if they complain about something they might get a discount. For these people, they have found techniques that have been successful and they're willing to try those techniques on everyone. Do not be afraid!! Be forewarned and fore-armed with neutral statements that show you are a professional. For example---
    Her: "My other longarmer doesn't charge for thread." You: "Isn't it great that small businesses like mine are able to set their own rules and prices."
    Her: "I thought there would be more quilting on this for the price you charged." You: "Well, let's look at the intake sheet. When you signed it you agreed to this medium overall design of leaves and swirls. Here on the back is where I demonstrated how far apart the stitching would be for this price-range."
    Her: "Loretta Longarmer said she could quilt this one for $80." You: "Isn't that a great price. All I can say is she and I are not direct competitors. She does only two designs, both large overall designs. What we have discussed is nothing like what she offers."
    Please notice I'm giving you the secret for non-confrontational interaction with difficult customers. The secret is to STOP TALKING. Don't explain. Don't complain. Don't share how/why you charge what you do--that's none of their business so just quote them a price and don't negotiate.
    State the facts/ nothing personal/ all professional/ no negotiations (unless they want to step down the cost with an equal step down in the level of quilting.)
    When you state the facts, STOP TALKING, You'll notice in the scenarios above, at no time do you say "I'm sorry." You don't elaborate or embellish. You don't say why you charge what you do. No mechanic, repair person, or professional ever has to justify what they charge. When you stop short of the explanation/justification the ball is in their court. Very seldom will they continue to press for a discount/freebie.
    And if they do--do what I do. I call it the nod-and-ah. When someone presses for something you have already denied them, tilt your head to the side, nod slightly, and say "Ah". Or "Hmmm." Completely non-committal--just letting them know you've heard them. Don't say anything else. You will watch them become uncomfortable. Nod slightly again and make a little frown. If they continue to press, let them know you have done all the charity quilting you allow for the year and can't give any more discounts. Notice, no "I'm sorry"--just the facts. If they continue to press--even if they're your second customer and you don't know when a third might come along---tell them you two are "not a good fit". You "aren't comfortable" with giving discounts to some people when you can't offer them to all.
    Long-winded--again! My apologies. Opps--never apologize!!
  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Bekah in Little Accomplishments   
    I'm also amazed and happy when I'm able to finish a cone of thread, Joan.
    Another gratifying moment is when I unload a quilt to hang for presentation. I never look at it while I hang it up, but wait until I'm across the room so I can turn around and take it all in. I hope to enjoy the same excitement they might have when they come to get it.
    Perhaps my favorite day is one without outside obligations--no day job, no place to be but in the studio, groceries in the fridge and dinner planned--a whole day just to quilt. What a pleasure!
  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from kathyb in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from RoseCity Quilter in Giving it Away   
    Don't be afraid, Debbie! I've been in business since 2005 and do 80-100 customer quilts every year. Ninety nine percent of my customers are gracious, generous, and appreciate the job I do for them for the price I charge. Once a year I'll have a doozey pop up! Just as in every other part of your life, you'll run into people who speak before they think, or try to wheedle a bargain out of you, or realize if they complain about something they might get a discount. For these people, they have found techniques that have been successful and they're willing to try those techniques on everyone. Do not be afraid!! Be forewarned and fore-armed with neutral statements that show you are a professional. For example---
    Her: "My other longarmer doesn't charge for thread." You: "Isn't it great that small businesses like mine are able to set their own rules and prices."
    Her: "I thought there would be more quilting on this for the price you charged." You: "Well, let's look at the intake sheet. When you signed it you agreed to this medium overall design of leaves and swirls. Here on the back is where I demonstrated how far apart the stitching would be for this price-range."
    Her: "Loretta Longarmer said she could quilt this one for $80." You: "Isn't that a great price. All I can say is she and I are not direct competitors. She does only two designs, both large overall designs. What we have discussed is nothing like what she offers."
    Please notice I'm giving you the secret for non-confrontational interaction with difficult customers. The secret is to STOP TALKING. Don't explain. Don't complain. Don't share how/why you charge what you do--that's none of their business so just quote them a price and don't negotiate.
    State the facts/ nothing personal/ all professional/ no negotiations (unless they want to step down the cost with an equal step down in the level of quilting.)
    When you state the facts, STOP TALKING, You'll notice in the scenarios above, at no time do you say "I'm sorry." You don't elaborate or embellish. You don't say why you charge what you do. No mechanic, repair person, or professional ever has to justify what they charge. When you stop short of the explanation/justification the ball is in their court. Very seldom will they continue to press for a discount/freebie.
    And if they do--do what I do. I call it the nod-and-ah. When someone presses for something you have already denied them, tilt your head to the side, nod slightly, and say "Ah". Or "Hmmm." Completely non-committal--just letting them know you've heard them. Don't say anything else. You will watch them become uncomfortable. Nod slightly again and make a little frown. If they continue to press, let them know you have done all the charity quilting you allow for the year and can't give any more discounts. Notice, no "I'm sorry"--just the facts. If they continue to press--even if they're your second customer and you don't know when a third might come along---tell them you two are "not a good fit". You "aren't comfortable" with giving discounts to some people when you can't offer them to all.
    Long-winded--again! My apologies. Opps--never apologize!!
  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from aleksich in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Primitive1 in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Joan did it in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Sharonarooni in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltingjoyful51 in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LeeAnn in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Janette in Giving it Away   
    "You quilt? Oh, that's a nice little hobby. My Gramma used to quilt."
    "I love that quilt you brought to show at work. Could you make a quilt for me?"
    "If I brought you some fabric would you make it into a quilt? My Auntie had boxes of fabric from the 70's stored in her garage. You could make me something from that."
    Translation: I'm completely clueless not only about how a quilt is made but also about how much time, energy, talent, and money goes into making one.
    My favorite? "I can buy a quilt at WallMart for $89 and that includes two pillowcases and a bed skirt. Why would you charge so much for one?"
    My favorite answer? Because that China-made quilt is a decorative item. It won't last through two washings and then you can buy another. A real quilt will last until your grandkids are old and they realize what an heirloom it is--- and fight over it!
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Debbie Turner in NC area looking for good machine   
    I think you shouldn't buy a frame until you decide which machine you want. Better to find an already assembled system that works than buy pieces that need altering.
    Check out Longarm University for used machines.
    Have you looked at Lenni's with a 12" frame? Those can handle a backer up to 120" wide.
    And used machines are available all the time here and on other brands' sites.
    Which systems have you tried? Would you opt for a mid-arm?
    Good luck with your search and if possible, list a "looking to buy" ad on any sites that will allow it.
  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Heritage Keepsakes in just for fun - You Might Be a Long Arm Quilter When (please add on)   
    I'll add--you might be a longarmer..
    If you refuse to hem pants, sew on buttons, or repair clothing. If it doesn't sew on the Milli, it doesn't get sewn!
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from GrandmaLKB in just for fun - You Might Be a Long Arm Quilter When (please add on)   
    I'll add--you might be a longarmer..
    If you refuse to hem pants, sew on buttons, or repair clothing. If it doesn't sew on the Milli, it doesn't get sewn!
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Primitive1 in just for fun - You Might Be a Long Arm Quilter When (please add on)   
    You might be a longarm quilter when...
    You walk into the LQS and go straight for the thread.
    Your freezer is full so you don't have to make dinner every night.
    Your gifts under the tree are from Superior Threads, Columbia River Quilting, and APQS. ( I got a letter from APQS and opened it since it was addressed to me. It was a receipt for Dennis for new leaders. Surprise!! )
    Those "other" people in your life don't have a clue what you do and congratulate you for having a nice "hobby". hahaha!
  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Primitive1 in just for fun - You Might Be a Long Arm Quilter When (please add on)   
    I'll add--you might be a longarmer..
    If you refuse to hem pants, sew on buttons, or repair clothing. If it doesn't sew on the Milli, it doesn't get sewn!
  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from barbm in just for fun - You Might Be a Long Arm Quilter When (please add on)   
    I'll add--you might be a longarmer..
    If you refuse to hem pants, sew on buttons, or repair clothing. If it doesn't sew on the Milli, it doesn't get sewn!
  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltingjoyful51 in NQR Difficult day   
    I'm writing this through tears as I watch what is unfolding in Connecticut. The terrible loss of innocent children and adults is hard to grasp.
    Tell them you love them. Every day. Tell the ones who are important to you, who help you and who are helped by you, who you live with and who you know you can't live without. Tell them you love them.
  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LeeAnn in NQR Difficult day   
    I'm writing this through tears as I watch what is unfolding in Connecticut. The terrible loss of innocent children and adults is hard to grasp.
    Tell them you love them. Every day. Tell the ones who are important to you, who help you and who are helped by you, who you live with and who you know you can't live without. Tell them you love them.
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in NQR Difficult day   
    I'm writing this through tears as I watch what is unfolding in Connecticut. The terrible loss of innocent children and adults is hard to grasp.
    Tell them you love them. Every day. Tell the ones who are important to you, who help you and who are helped by you, who you live with and who you know you can't live without. Tell them you love them.
  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from lindasewsit in NQR Difficult day   
    I'm writing this through tears as I watch what is unfolding in Connecticut. The terrible loss of innocent children and adults is hard to grasp.
    Tell them you love them. Every day. Tell the ones who are important to you, who help you and who are helped by you, who you live with and who you know you can't live without. Tell them you love them.
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