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ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Borderline Quilter in That book thing   
    Hi Kay. Dennis is the computer genius of the family and it will be available as a download (PDF) if you want to print your own and save the pricey international shipping charges. And not have a long wait! Thanks for asking.
  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from connieb in That book thing   
    Den and I are finishing up the printing of "the book" today!
    I'm taking a few copies to MQX so my Moxie buddies can critique it. Ask to see it if you run in to me!
    Thanks to all for the encouragement and not-so-subtle nudging!
    I'll post info after I return from Portland. It'll eventually be available on our website.
    FYI--it's a sashing and border design book with hints and tips.
    Love you all!
    Linda and Den
  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from suzanp in No beep-beep   
    As Dawn stated, the beep is a safety feature so you don't stitch over something you don't want to (blood is so hard to get out of fabric! ). APQS would never recommend you to silence the chirp, but you can mute it a bit with a few wraps of electrical tape around the chirp box. It's under the hood towards the back.
    That said, the reason it makes you crazy is you really only hear it when you stop to think about your next move! It's off when you finish a pass or need to tie off. But when you're thinking it's very distracting. So, when you stop to think just turn it off with the touch of a button. If you start with your needle down, it will be down when you stop and then it's easy to plan your next move, push two buttons, and continue your stitching.
    This advice from an oldie who finds the chirp to be music to her ears!
  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Oma in Loading a backer without squaring it first--long   
    Another thread had questions about methods for squaring a backer before loading. Here is a technique for loading those wide backs or pieced backers that are large and perhaps not square--without messing with them.
    1- If it is a wide back, load with the selvedge attached to the leaders. If it is a pieced backer, lay it out on the floor and look for the edge with the straightest line. If the pieced backer is directional--either in the fabric or configuration of the pieced blocks, figure which way it needs to be loaded. If it isn't straight, you may need to trim a bit, but if you have it laid out and can do it, simply mark the straight edge with an water-erase marker or even a permanent marker. This edge will load to the front roller and eventually be trimmed off. If the pieced backer is not directional, find the straightest edge and that will load to the front roller. Mark a bit if there are whoopsies that need to be evened out. ("Whoopsies"? A technical term for swoops or poke-outs of fabric that stray from straight.) Just mark those whoopsies straight.
    2- You now have a line--either marked or woven--that will load to the front roller. Splay all that fabric wrong side up across the rollers with the loading edge at the front. *You do not need to center the fabric.* Did you get that? Don't center--it isn't necessary with this technique. And you don't need to place the fabric under the leveler roller--just throw it over the rollers and let it hang down the back of the frame. Unfurl a foot of the backer leader fabric from that front roller. Reach INSIDE the two rollers, grab the backer leader fabric and bring it up to lay the edge all along the top of that roller. You now have the side of the leader facing you, that you will pin the backer to. Bring the backer fabric towards you so the edge of both backer and fabric are facing you and lined up. Start in the middle and pin to the edge--if there is a selvedge, lay the selvedge so it hangs beyond the leader edge and pin onto the regular weave of the fabric--usually a quarter-inch to a half-inch in from the inside of the selvedge. Pin from the center to the other edge.
    3- Gather all the backer fabric on one arm and pull it towards you. Bring the bundle UNDER the frontrollers in a big circle and push it all under the leveler roller and over the back leader roller. This is just an easier way to get the backer in position rather than stuffing it all between the two front rollers and accomplishes the same thing. Sounds funny, but try it.
    4- Here's the loading secret. Go to the back and pull and straighten all the backer with the excess pooling on the floor. Pull the fabric taut until it is completely flat with the front backer (which will have about 10 inches or so of the leader extending out towards the back) and the pinned fabric is tight. Adjust and pull so it is all smooth and flat. Now it's all smooth and flat, the excess backer is pooled onto the floor-- try to get that hanging as evenly as possible. Go to the front and release the brake while holding the roller stationary. Assuming you have power advance, step on the RIGHT pedal and the backer fabric will be advancing towards you over the roller. The canvas will give the fabric a grip and stay fairly straight as it advances. Load the advancing fabric by slowly rotating the front roller at the same speed. Try to keep the fabric in the stitching field flat. Watch the top of the back roller for bumps and lumps. As these appear, set the brake and even out the bumps by reaching from the front and pulling each edge carefully to smooth the fabric flat. I usually go to the back to do this so I can flap out the backer and help it feed evenly. Back to the front and advance again. The reason this works is you have started with a straight edge which will make the fabric load straight if you are careful.
    4- IF the backer is not square, it will immediately start to show. You will notice that one side is scrolling (loading) wider and one side is scrolling inward. This is OK and you will end up knowing if you have enough USABLE straight fabric to safely load the quilt. Advance, tug, pat, smooth, advance, tug, advance, smooth.
    5-Stop advancing when the backer is just above the tabletop and you can see that the back edge of the fabric is (hopefully) parallel to the table top. Take the excess fabric that is over the backer roller and lift it up and use one pin to pin it to the fabric in the stitching field. Unfurl the backer leader about 10 inches, reach inside and bring the edge up to lay along the top of the roller. Unpin the fabric and bring it up to lay on the leader. Pin to the leader somewhere in the middle and smooth the fabric along the leader. Now look at the sag in the fabric. If there are bias wavy lines, unpin the middle and adjust the fabric right or left until the waves are gone and the fabric looks even. This is exactly the technique you use when you square up yardage. You grab selvedges and hang the yardage down, looking for distortion and waves. Then you adjust the selvedges until the fabric hangs true. You then know that the fabric was not cut on the real grain and you have long triangles of fabric that you remove when you square up. Same thing only on a huge scale!
    Have I lost you yet!
    6- Pin the backer--center/out/center/out. The backer is pinned and you have pushed the leader over the bar and the backer now is a big hammock. Go to the front and remove the sag by rolling onto the BACK roller. Then advance to the front roller. If you have sag on one side, roll back and forth to even it out.
    7- Now the backer is loaded and even. Takes less time to do than it takes to try to describe it! Look at the two front rollers. The not-square backer has scrolled onto the roller. One side is scrolling out and one is scrolling in. Take a quilt clamp or use your blue water erase pen and place a mark on the canvas of the top roller where the backer is NARROWEST.
    The scrolling-out side is easy--mark where the first loading pin is. The scrolling-in side needs investigation--press along the line of pins you used to load and find the first one. Mark there. The distance between the marks is the USABLE width of the backer. You then must decide if that usable width is enough for the quilt top. If it is, use the marks to load the top, centering between the marks, not the edges.
    8-If there is not enough usable width, call your customer and explain. She can pitch a fit at the LQS and get a squared-up replacement, tear-to-square and add more backer, or replace it completely. Believe me, she will be more vigilant with the next backer.
    Pleasepleaseplease don't try to fudge one of these to try to skip the drama of replacing a backer. The quilt will be a nightmare with constant adjustments and will never hang straight--even on a bed.
    I hope this wasn't too confusing. Print it out and try it with a big piece of fabric and it should be OK. The loading technique of reaching in and pinning to the backer results in an edge with all the pin points inside a fold made by the backer and the leader. I have always loaded this way and never have hole in my clothes. Place the pins at the ends both facing in, and you also won't tear a hole in your forearm as you quilt!
    Comments please on whether this is confusing. I will edit or expand on it if there are questions.
  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from IMN2Quilting in Loading a backer without squaring it first--long   
    Another thread had questions about methods for squaring a backer before loading. Here is a technique for loading those wide backs or pieced backers that are large and perhaps not square--without messing with them.
    1- If it is a wide back, load with the selvedge attached to the leaders. If it is a pieced backer, lay it out on the floor and look for the edge with the straightest line. If the pieced backer is directional--either in the fabric or configuration of the pieced blocks, figure which way it needs to be loaded. If it isn't straight, you may need to trim a bit, but if you have it laid out and can do it, simply mark the straight edge with an water-erase marker or even a permanent marker. This edge will load to the front roller and eventually be trimmed off. If the pieced backer is not directional, find the straightest edge and that will load to the front roller. Mark a bit if there are whoopsies that need to be evened out. ("Whoopsies"? A technical term for swoops or poke-outs of fabric that stray from straight.) Just mark those whoopsies straight.
    2- You now have a line--either marked or woven--that will load to the front roller. Splay all that fabric wrong side up across the rollers with the loading edge at the front. *You do not need to center the fabric.* Did you get that? Don't center--it isn't necessary with this technique. And you don't need to place the fabric under the leveler roller--just throw it over the rollers and let it hang down the back of the frame. Unfurl a foot of the backer leader fabric from that front roller. Reach INSIDE the two rollers, grab the backer leader fabric and bring it up to lay the edge all along the top of that roller. You now have the side of the leader facing you, that you will pin the backer to. Bring the backer fabric towards you so the edge of both backer and fabric are facing you and lined up. Start in the middle and pin to the edge--if there is a selvedge, lay the selvedge so it hangs beyond the leader edge and pin onto the regular weave of the fabric--usually a quarter-inch to a half-inch in from the inside of the selvedge. Pin from the center to the other edge.
    3- Gather all the backer fabric on one arm and pull it towards you. Bring the bundle UNDER the frontrollers in a big circle and push it all under the leveler roller and over the back leader roller. This is just an easier way to get the backer in position rather than stuffing it all between the two front rollers and accomplishes the same thing. Sounds funny, but try it.
    4- Here's the loading secret. Go to the back and pull and straighten all the backer with the excess pooling on the floor. Pull the fabric taut until it is completely flat with the front backer (which will have about 10 inches or so of the leader extending out towards the back) and the pinned fabric is tight. Adjust and pull so it is all smooth and flat. Now it's all smooth and flat, the excess backer is pooled onto the floor-- try to get that hanging as evenly as possible. Go to the front and release the brake while holding the roller stationary. Assuming you have power advance, step on the RIGHT pedal and the backer fabric will be advancing towards you over the roller. The canvas will give the fabric a grip and stay fairly straight as it advances. Load the advancing fabric by slowly rotating the front roller at the same speed. Try to keep the fabric in the stitching field flat. Watch the top of the back roller for bumps and lumps. As these appear, set the brake and even out the bumps by reaching from the front and pulling each edge carefully to smooth the fabric flat. I usually go to the back to do this so I can flap out the backer and help it feed evenly. Back to the front and advance again. The reason this works is you have started with a straight edge which will make the fabric load straight if you are careful.
    4- IF the backer is not square, it will immediately start to show. You will notice that one side is scrolling (loading) wider and one side is scrolling inward. This is OK and you will end up knowing if you have enough USABLE straight fabric to safely load the quilt. Advance, tug, pat, smooth, advance, tug, advance, smooth.
    5-Stop advancing when the backer is just above the tabletop and you can see that the back edge of the fabric is (hopefully) parallel to the table top. Take the excess fabric that is over the backer roller and lift it up and use one pin to pin it to the fabric in the stitching field. Unfurl the backer leader about 10 inches, reach inside and bring the edge up to lay along the top of the roller. Unpin the fabric and bring it up to lay on the leader. Pin to the leader somewhere in the middle and smooth the fabric along the leader. Now look at the sag in the fabric. If there are bias wavy lines, unpin the middle and adjust the fabric right or left until the waves are gone and the fabric looks even. This is exactly the technique you use when you square up yardage. You grab selvedges and hang the yardage down, looking for distortion and waves. Then you adjust the selvedges until the fabric hangs true. You then know that the fabric was not cut on the real grain and you have long triangles of fabric that you remove when you square up. Same thing only on a huge scale!
    Have I lost you yet!
    6- Pin the backer--center/out/center/out. The backer is pinned and you have pushed the leader over the bar and the backer now is a big hammock. Go to the front and remove the sag by rolling onto the BACK roller. Then advance to the front roller. If you have sag on one side, roll back and forth to even it out.
    7- Now the backer is loaded and even. Takes less time to do than it takes to try to describe it! Look at the two front rollers. The not-square backer has scrolled onto the roller. One side is scrolling out and one is scrolling in. Take a quilt clamp or use your blue water erase pen and place a mark on the canvas of the top roller where the backer is NARROWEST.
    The scrolling-out side is easy--mark where the first loading pin is. The scrolling-in side needs investigation--press along the line of pins you used to load and find the first one. Mark there. The distance between the marks is the USABLE width of the backer. You then must decide if that usable width is enough for the quilt top. If it is, use the marks to load the top, centering between the marks, not the edges.
    8-If there is not enough usable width, call your customer and explain. She can pitch a fit at the LQS and get a squared-up replacement, tear-to-square and add more backer, or replace it completely. Believe me, she will be more vigilant with the next backer.
    Pleasepleaseplease don't try to fudge one of these to try to skip the drama of replacing a backer. The quilt will be a nightmare with constant adjustments and will never hang straight--even on a bed.
    I hope this wasn't too confusing. Print it out and try it with a big piece of fabric and it should be OK. The loading technique of reaching in and pinning to the backer results in an edge with all the pin points inside a fold made by the backer and the leader. I have always loaded this way and never have hole in my clothes. Place the pins at the ends both facing in, and you also won't tear a hole in your forearm as you quilt!
    Comments please on whether this is confusing. I will edit or expand on it if there are questions.
  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Anette D. in Loading a backer without squaring it first--long   
    Another thread had questions about methods for squaring a backer before loading. Here is a technique for loading those wide backs or pieced backers that are large and perhaps not square--without messing with them.
    1- If it is a wide back, load with the selvedge attached to the leaders. If it is a pieced backer, lay it out on the floor and look for the edge with the straightest line. If the pieced backer is directional--either in the fabric or configuration of the pieced blocks, figure which way it needs to be loaded. If it isn't straight, you may need to trim a bit, but if you have it laid out and can do it, simply mark the straight edge with an water-erase marker or even a permanent marker. This edge will load to the front roller and eventually be trimmed off. If the pieced backer is not directional, find the straightest edge and that will load to the front roller. Mark a bit if there are whoopsies that need to be evened out. ("Whoopsies"? A technical term for swoops or poke-outs of fabric that stray from straight.) Just mark those whoopsies straight.
    2- You now have a line--either marked or woven--that will load to the front roller. Splay all that fabric wrong side up across the rollers with the loading edge at the front. *You do not need to center the fabric.* Did you get that? Don't center--it isn't necessary with this technique. And you don't need to place the fabric under the leveler roller--just throw it over the rollers and let it hang down the back of the frame. Unfurl a foot of the backer leader fabric from that front roller. Reach INSIDE the two rollers, grab the backer leader fabric and bring it up to lay the edge all along the top of that roller. You now have the side of the leader facing you, that you will pin the backer to. Bring the backer fabric towards you so the edge of both backer and fabric are facing you and lined up. Start in the middle and pin to the edge--if there is a selvedge, lay the selvedge so it hangs beyond the leader edge and pin onto the regular weave of the fabric--usually a quarter-inch to a half-inch in from the inside of the selvedge. Pin from the center to the other edge.
    3- Gather all the backer fabric on one arm and pull it towards you. Bring the bundle UNDER the frontrollers in a big circle and push it all under the leveler roller and over the back leader roller. This is just an easier way to get the backer in position rather than stuffing it all between the two front rollers and accomplishes the same thing. Sounds funny, but try it.
    4- Here's the loading secret. Go to the back and pull and straighten all the backer with the excess pooling on the floor. Pull the fabric taut until it is completely flat with the front backer (which will have about 10 inches or so of the leader extending out towards the back) and the pinned fabric is tight. Adjust and pull so it is all smooth and flat. Now it's all smooth and flat, the excess backer is pooled onto the floor-- try to get that hanging as evenly as possible. Go to the front and release the brake while holding the roller stationary. Assuming you have power advance, step on the RIGHT pedal and the backer fabric will be advancing towards you over the roller. The canvas will give the fabric a grip and stay fairly straight as it advances. Load the advancing fabric by slowly rotating the front roller at the same speed. Try to keep the fabric in the stitching field flat. Watch the top of the back roller for bumps and lumps. As these appear, set the brake and even out the bumps by reaching from the front and pulling each edge carefully to smooth the fabric flat. I usually go to the back to do this so I can flap out the backer and help it feed evenly. Back to the front and advance again. The reason this works is you have started with a straight edge which will make the fabric load straight if you are careful.
    4- IF the backer is not square, it will immediately start to show. You will notice that one side is scrolling (loading) wider and one side is scrolling inward. This is OK and you will end up knowing if you have enough USABLE straight fabric to safely load the quilt. Advance, tug, pat, smooth, advance, tug, advance, smooth.
    5-Stop advancing when the backer is just above the tabletop and you can see that the back edge of the fabric is (hopefully) parallel to the table top. Take the excess fabric that is over the backer roller and lift it up and use one pin to pin it to the fabric in the stitching field. Unfurl the backer leader about 10 inches, reach inside and bring the edge up to lay along the top of the roller. Unpin the fabric and bring it up to lay on the leader. Pin to the leader somewhere in the middle and smooth the fabric along the leader. Now look at the sag in the fabric. If there are bias wavy lines, unpin the middle and adjust the fabric right or left until the waves are gone and the fabric looks even. This is exactly the technique you use when you square up yardage. You grab selvedges and hang the yardage down, looking for distortion and waves. Then you adjust the selvedges until the fabric hangs true. You then know that the fabric was not cut on the real grain and you have long triangles of fabric that you remove when you square up. Same thing only on a huge scale!
    Have I lost you yet!
    6- Pin the backer--center/out/center/out. The backer is pinned and you have pushed the leader over the bar and the backer now is a big hammock. Go to the front and remove the sag by rolling onto the BACK roller. Then advance to the front roller. If you have sag on one side, roll back and forth to even it out.
    7- Now the backer is loaded and even. Takes less time to do than it takes to try to describe it! Look at the two front rollers. The not-square backer has scrolled onto the roller. One side is scrolling out and one is scrolling in. Take a quilt clamp or use your blue water erase pen and place a mark on the canvas of the top roller where the backer is NARROWEST.
    The scrolling-out side is easy--mark where the first loading pin is. The scrolling-in side needs investigation--press along the line of pins you used to load and find the first one. Mark there. The distance between the marks is the USABLE width of the backer. You then must decide if that usable width is enough for the quilt top. If it is, use the marks to load the top, centering between the marks, not the edges.
    8-If there is not enough usable width, call your customer and explain. She can pitch a fit at the LQS and get a squared-up replacement, tear-to-square and add more backer, or replace it completely. Believe me, she will be more vigilant with the next backer.
    Pleasepleaseplease don't try to fudge one of these to try to skip the drama of replacing a backer. The quilt will be a nightmare with constant adjustments and will never hang straight--even on a bed.
    I hope this wasn't too confusing. Print it out and try it with a big piece of fabric and it should be OK. The loading technique of reaching in and pinning to the backer results in an edge with all the pin points inside a fold made by the backer and the leader. I have always loaded this way and never have hole in my clothes. Place the pins at the ends both facing in, and you also won't tear a hole in your forearm as you quilt!
    Comments please on whether this is confusing. I will edit or expand on it if there are questions.
  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from arwing in Loading a backer without squaring it first--long   
    Another thread had questions about methods for squaring a backer before loading. Here is a technique for loading those wide backs or pieced backers that are large and perhaps not square--without messing with them.
    1- If it is a wide back, load with the selvedge attached to the leaders. If it is a pieced backer, lay it out on the floor and look for the edge with the straightest line. If the pieced backer is directional--either in the fabric or configuration of the pieced blocks, figure which way it needs to be loaded. If it isn't straight, you may need to trim a bit, but if you have it laid out and can do it, simply mark the straight edge with an water-erase marker or even a permanent marker. This edge will load to the front roller and eventually be trimmed off. If the pieced backer is not directional, find the straightest edge and that will load to the front roller. Mark a bit if there are whoopsies that need to be evened out. ("Whoopsies"? A technical term for swoops or poke-outs of fabric that stray from straight.) Just mark those whoopsies straight.
    2- You now have a line--either marked or woven--that will load to the front roller. Splay all that fabric wrong side up across the rollers with the loading edge at the front. *You do not need to center the fabric.* Did you get that? Don't center--it isn't necessary with this technique. And you don't need to place the fabric under the leveler roller--just throw it over the rollers and let it hang down the back of the frame. Unfurl a foot of the backer leader fabric from that front roller. Reach INSIDE the two rollers, grab the backer leader fabric and bring it up to lay the edge all along the top of that roller. You now have the side of the leader facing you, that you will pin the backer to. Bring the backer fabric towards you so the edge of both backer and fabric are facing you and lined up. Start in the middle and pin to the edge--if there is a selvedge, lay the selvedge so it hangs beyond the leader edge and pin onto the regular weave of the fabric--usually a quarter-inch to a half-inch in from the inside of the selvedge. Pin from the center to the other edge.
    3- Gather all the backer fabric on one arm and pull it towards you. Bring the bundle UNDER the frontrollers in a big circle and push it all under the leveler roller and over the back leader roller. This is just an easier way to get the backer in position rather than stuffing it all between the two front rollers and accomplishes the same thing. Sounds funny, but try it.
    4- Here's the loading secret. Go to the back and pull and straighten all the backer with the excess pooling on the floor. Pull the fabric taut until it is completely flat with the front backer (which will have about 10 inches or so of the leader extending out towards the back) and the pinned fabric is tight. Adjust and pull so it is all smooth and flat. Now it's all smooth and flat, the excess backer is pooled onto the floor-- try to get that hanging as evenly as possible. Go to the front and release the brake while holding the roller stationary. Assuming you have power advance, step on the RIGHT pedal and the backer fabric will be advancing towards you over the roller. The canvas will give the fabric a grip and stay fairly straight as it advances. Load the advancing fabric by slowly rotating the front roller at the same speed. Try to keep the fabric in the stitching field flat. Watch the top of the back roller for bumps and lumps. As these appear, set the brake and even out the bumps by reaching from the front and pulling each edge carefully to smooth the fabric flat. I usually go to the back to do this so I can flap out the backer and help it feed evenly. Back to the front and advance again. The reason this works is you have started with a straight edge which will make the fabric load straight if you are careful.
    4- IF the backer is not square, it will immediately start to show. You will notice that one side is scrolling (loading) wider and one side is scrolling inward. This is OK and you will end up knowing if you have enough USABLE straight fabric to safely load the quilt. Advance, tug, pat, smooth, advance, tug, advance, smooth.
    5-Stop advancing when the backer is just above the tabletop and you can see that the back edge of the fabric is (hopefully) parallel to the table top. Take the excess fabric that is over the backer roller and lift it up and use one pin to pin it to the fabric in the stitching field. Unfurl the backer leader about 10 inches, reach inside and bring the edge up to lay along the top of the roller. Unpin the fabric and bring it up to lay on the leader. Pin to the leader somewhere in the middle and smooth the fabric along the leader. Now look at the sag in the fabric. If there are bias wavy lines, unpin the middle and adjust the fabric right or left until the waves are gone and the fabric looks even. This is exactly the technique you use when you square up yardage. You grab selvedges and hang the yardage down, looking for distortion and waves. Then you adjust the selvedges until the fabric hangs true. You then know that the fabric was not cut on the real grain and you have long triangles of fabric that you remove when you square up. Same thing only on a huge scale!
    Have I lost you yet!
    6- Pin the backer--center/out/center/out. The backer is pinned and you have pushed the leader over the bar and the backer now is a big hammock. Go to the front and remove the sag by rolling onto the BACK roller. Then advance to the front roller. If you have sag on one side, roll back and forth to even it out.
    7- Now the backer is loaded and even. Takes less time to do than it takes to try to describe it! Look at the two front rollers. The not-square backer has scrolled onto the roller. One side is scrolling out and one is scrolling in. Take a quilt clamp or use your blue water erase pen and place a mark on the canvas of the top roller where the backer is NARROWEST.
    The scrolling-out side is easy--mark where the first loading pin is. The scrolling-in side needs investigation--press along the line of pins you used to load and find the first one. Mark there. The distance between the marks is the USABLE width of the backer. You then must decide if that usable width is enough for the quilt top. If it is, use the marks to load the top, centering between the marks, not the edges.
    8-If there is not enough usable width, call your customer and explain. She can pitch a fit at the LQS and get a squared-up replacement, tear-to-square and add more backer, or replace it completely. Believe me, she will be more vigilant with the next backer.
    Pleasepleaseplease don't try to fudge one of these to try to skip the drama of replacing a backer. The quilt will be a nightmare with constant adjustments and will never hang straight--even on a bed.
    I hope this wasn't too confusing. Print it out and try it with a big piece of fabric and it should be OK. The loading technique of reaching in and pinning to the backer results in an edge with all the pin points inside a fold made by the backer and the leader. I have always loaded this way and never have hole in my clothes. Place the pins at the ends both facing in, and you also won't tear a hole in your forearm as you quilt!
    Comments please on whether this is confusing. I will edit or expand on it if there are questions.
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from ReisingStarQuilts in Loading a backer without squaring it first--long   
    Another thread had questions about methods for squaring a backer before loading. Here is a technique for loading those wide backs or pieced backers that are large and perhaps not square--without messing with them.
    1- If it is a wide back, load with the selvedge attached to the leaders. If it is a pieced backer, lay it out on the floor and look for the edge with the straightest line. If the pieced backer is directional--either in the fabric or configuration of the pieced blocks, figure which way it needs to be loaded. If it isn't straight, you may need to trim a bit, but if you have it laid out and can do it, simply mark the straight edge with an water-erase marker or even a permanent marker. This edge will load to the front roller and eventually be trimmed off. If the pieced backer is not directional, find the straightest edge and that will load to the front roller. Mark a bit if there are whoopsies that need to be evened out. ("Whoopsies"? A technical term for swoops or poke-outs of fabric that stray from straight.) Just mark those whoopsies straight.
    2- You now have a line--either marked or woven--that will load to the front roller. Splay all that fabric wrong side up across the rollers with the loading edge at the front. *You do not need to center the fabric.* Did you get that? Don't center--it isn't necessary with this technique. And you don't need to place the fabric under the leveler roller--just throw it over the rollers and let it hang down the back of the frame. Unfurl a foot of the backer leader fabric from that front roller. Reach INSIDE the two rollers, grab the backer leader fabric and bring it up to lay the edge all along the top of that roller. You now have the side of the leader facing you, that you will pin the backer to. Bring the backer fabric towards you so the edge of both backer and fabric are facing you and lined up. Start in the middle and pin to the edge--if there is a selvedge, lay the selvedge so it hangs beyond the leader edge and pin onto the regular weave of the fabric--usually a quarter-inch to a half-inch in from the inside of the selvedge. Pin from the center to the other edge.
    3- Gather all the backer fabric on one arm and pull it towards you. Bring the bundle UNDER the frontrollers in a big circle and push it all under the leveler roller and over the back leader roller. This is just an easier way to get the backer in position rather than stuffing it all between the two front rollers and accomplishes the same thing. Sounds funny, but try it.
    4- Here's the loading secret. Go to the back and pull and straighten all the backer with the excess pooling on the floor. Pull the fabric taut until it is completely flat with the front backer (which will have about 10 inches or so of the leader extending out towards the back) and the pinned fabric is tight. Adjust and pull so it is all smooth and flat. Now it's all smooth and flat, the excess backer is pooled onto the floor-- try to get that hanging as evenly as possible. Go to the front and release the brake while holding the roller stationary. Assuming you have power advance, step on the RIGHT pedal and the backer fabric will be advancing towards you over the roller. The canvas will give the fabric a grip and stay fairly straight as it advances. Load the advancing fabric by slowly rotating the front roller at the same speed. Try to keep the fabric in the stitching field flat. Watch the top of the back roller for bumps and lumps. As these appear, set the brake and even out the bumps by reaching from the front and pulling each edge carefully to smooth the fabric flat. I usually go to the back to do this so I can flap out the backer and help it feed evenly. Back to the front and advance again. The reason this works is you have started with a straight edge which will make the fabric load straight if you are careful.
    4- IF the backer is not square, it will immediately start to show. You will notice that one side is scrolling (loading) wider and one side is scrolling inward. This is OK and you will end up knowing if you have enough USABLE straight fabric to safely load the quilt. Advance, tug, pat, smooth, advance, tug, advance, smooth.
    5-Stop advancing when the backer is just above the tabletop and you can see that the back edge of the fabric is (hopefully) parallel to the table top. Take the excess fabric that is over the backer roller and lift it up and use one pin to pin it to the fabric in the stitching field. Unfurl the backer leader about 10 inches, reach inside and bring the edge up to lay along the top of the roller. Unpin the fabric and bring it up to lay on the leader. Pin to the leader somewhere in the middle and smooth the fabric along the leader. Now look at the sag in the fabric. If there are bias wavy lines, unpin the middle and adjust the fabric right or left until the waves are gone and the fabric looks even. This is exactly the technique you use when you square up yardage. You grab selvedges and hang the yardage down, looking for distortion and waves. Then you adjust the selvedges until the fabric hangs true. You then know that the fabric was not cut on the real grain and you have long triangles of fabric that you remove when you square up. Same thing only on a huge scale!
    Have I lost you yet!
    6- Pin the backer--center/out/center/out. The backer is pinned and you have pushed the leader over the bar and the backer now is a big hammock. Go to the front and remove the sag by rolling onto the BACK roller. Then advance to the front roller. If you have sag on one side, roll back and forth to even it out.
    7- Now the backer is loaded and even. Takes less time to do than it takes to try to describe it! Look at the two front rollers. The not-square backer has scrolled onto the roller. One side is scrolling out and one is scrolling in. Take a quilt clamp or use your blue water erase pen and place a mark on the canvas of the top roller where the backer is NARROWEST.
    The scrolling-out side is easy--mark where the first loading pin is. The scrolling-in side needs investigation--press along the line of pins you used to load and find the first one. Mark there. The distance between the marks is the USABLE width of the backer. You then must decide if that usable width is enough for the quilt top. If it is, use the marks to load the top, centering between the marks, not the edges.
    8-If there is not enough usable width, call your customer and explain. She can pitch a fit at the LQS and get a squared-up replacement, tear-to-square and add more backer, or replace it completely. Believe me, she will be more vigilant with the next backer.
    Pleasepleaseplease don't try to fudge one of these to try to skip the drama of replacing a backer. The quilt will be a nightmare with constant adjustments and will never hang straight--even on a bed.
    I hope this wasn't too confusing. Print it out and try it with a big piece of fabric and it should be OK. The loading technique of reaching in and pinning to the backer results in an edge with all the pin points inside a fold made by the backer and the leader. I have always loaded this way and never have hole in my clothes. Place the pins at the ends both facing in, and you also won't tear a hole in your forearm as you quilt!
    Comments please on whether this is confusing. I will edit or expand on it if there are questions.
  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Farmwife Darlene in Loading a backer without squaring it first--long   
    Another thread had questions about methods for squaring a backer before loading. Here is a technique for loading those wide backs or pieced backers that are large and perhaps not square--without messing with them.
    1- If it is a wide back, load with the selvedge attached to the leaders. If it is a pieced backer, lay it out on the floor and look for the edge with the straightest line. If the pieced backer is directional--either in the fabric or configuration of the pieced blocks, figure which way it needs to be loaded. If it isn't straight, you may need to trim a bit, but if you have it laid out and can do it, simply mark the straight edge with an water-erase marker or even a permanent marker. This edge will load to the front roller and eventually be trimmed off. If the pieced backer is not directional, find the straightest edge and that will load to the front roller. Mark a bit if there are whoopsies that need to be evened out. ("Whoopsies"? A technical term for swoops or poke-outs of fabric that stray from straight.) Just mark those whoopsies straight.
    2- You now have a line--either marked or woven--that will load to the front roller. Splay all that fabric wrong side up across the rollers with the loading edge at the front. *You do not need to center the fabric.* Did you get that? Don't center--it isn't necessary with this technique. And you don't need to place the fabric under the leveler roller--just throw it over the rollers and let it hang down the back of the frame. Unfurl a foot of the backer leader fabric from that front roller. Reach INSIDE the two rollers, grab the backer leader fabric and bring it up to lay the edge all along the top of that roller. You now have the side of the leader facing you, that you will pin the backer to. Bring the backer fabric towards you so the edge of both backer and fabric are facing you and lined up. Start in the middle and pin to the edge--if there is a selvedge, lay the selvedge so it hangs beyond the leader edge and pin onto the regular weave of the fabric--usually a quarter-inch to a half-inch in from the inside of the selvedge. Pin from the center to the other edge.
    3- Gather all the backer fabric on one arm and pull it towards you. Bring the bundle UNDER the frontrollers in a big circle and push it all under the leveler roller and over the back leader roller. This is just an easier way to get the backer in position rather than stuffing it all between the two front rollers and accomplishes the same thing. Sounds funny, but try it.
    4- Here's the loading secret. Go to the back and pull and straighten all the backer with the excess pooling on the floor. Pull the fabric taut until it is completely flat with the front backer (which will have about 10 inches or so of the leader extending out towards the back) and the pinned fabric is tight. Adjust and pull so it is all smooth and flat. Now it's all smooth and flat, the excess backer is pooled onto the floor-- try to get that hanging as evenly as possible. Go to the front and release the brake while holding the roller stationary. Assuming you have power advance, step on the RIGHT pedal and the backer fabric will be advancing towards you over the roller. The canvas will give the fabric a grip and stay fairly straight as it advances. Load the advancing fabric by slowly rotating the front roller at the same speed. Try to keep the fabric in the stitching field flat. Watch the top of the back roller for bumps and lumps. As these appear, set the brake and even out the bumps by reaching from the front and pulling each edge carefully to smooth the fabric flat. I usually go to the back to do this so I can flap out the backer and help it feed evenly. Back to the front and advance again. The reason this works is you have started with a straight edge which will make the fabric load straight if you are careful.
    4- IF the backer is not square, it will immediately start to show. You will notice that one side is scrolling (loading) wider and one side is scrolling inward. This is OK and you will end up knowing if you have enough USABLE straight fabric to safely load the quilt. Advance, tug, pat, smooth, advance, tug, advance, smooth.
    5-Stop advancing when the backer is just above the tabletop and you can see that the back edge of the fabric is (hopefully) parallel to the table top. Take the excess fabric that is over the backer roller and lift it up and use one pin to pin it to the fabric in the stitching field. Unfurl the backer leader about 10 inches, reach inside and bring the edge up to lay along the top of the roller. Unpin the fabric and bring it up to lay on the leader. Pin to the leader somewhere in the middle and smooth the fabric along the leader. Now look at the sag in the fabric. If there are bias wavy lines, unpin the middle and adjust the fabric right or left until the waves are gone and the fabric looks even. This is exactly the technique you use when you square up yardage. You grab selvedges and hang the yardage down, looking for distortion and waves. Then you adjust the selvedges until the fabric hangs true. You then know that the fabric was not cut on the real grain and you have long triangles of fabric that you remove when you square up. Same thing only on a huge scale!
    Have I lost you yet!
    6- Pin the backer--center/out/center/out. The backer is pinned and you have pushed the leader over the bar and the backer now is a big hammock. Go to the front and remove the sag by rolling onto the BACK roller. Then advance to the front roller. If you have sag on one side, roll back and forth to even it out.
    7- Now the backer is loaded and even. Takes less time to do than it takes to try to describe it! Look at the two front rollers. The not-square backer has scrolled onto the roller. One side is scrolling out and one is scrolling in. Take a quilt clamp or use your blue water erase pen and place a mark on the canvas of the top roller where the backer is NARROWEST.
    The scrolling-out side is easy--mark where the first loading pin is. The scrolling-in side needs investigation--press along the line of pins you used to load and find the first one. Mark there. The distance between the marks is the USABLE width of the backer. You then must decide if that usable width is enough for the quilt top. If it is, use the marks to load the top, centering between the marks, not the edges.
    8-If there is not enough usable width, call your customer and explain. She can pitch a fit at the LQS and get a squared-up replacement, tear-to-square and add more backer, or replace it completely. Believe me, she will be more vigilant with the next backer.
    Pleasepleaseplease don't try to fudge one of these to try to skip the drama of replacing a backer. The quilt will be a nightmare with constant adjustments and will never hang straight--even on a bed.
    I hope this wasn't too confusing. Print it out and try it with a big piece of fabric and it should be OK. The loading technique of reaching in and pinning to the backer results in an edge with all the pin points inside a fold made by the backer and the leader. I have always loaded this way and never have hole in my clothes. Place the pins at the ends both facing in, and you also won't tear a hole in your forearm as you quilt!
    Comments please on whether this is confusing. I will edit or expand on it if there are questions.
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from mscott2611 in Loading a backer without squaring it first--long   
    Another thread had questions about methods for squaring a backer before loading. Here is a technique for loading those wide backs or pieced backers that are large and perhaps not square--without messing with them.
    1- If it is a wide back, load with the selvedge attached to the leaders. If it is a pieced backer, lay it out on the floor and look for the edge with the straightest line. If the pieced backer is directional--either in the fabric or configuration of the pieced blocks, figure which way it needs to be loaded. If it isn't straight, you may need to trim a bit, but if you have it laid out and can do it, simply mark the straight edge with an water-erase marker or even a permanent marker. This edge will load to the front roller and eventually be trimmed off. If the pieced backer is not directional, find the straightest edge and that will load to the front roller. Mark a bit if there are whoopsies that need to be evened out. ("Whoopsies"? A technical term for swoops or poke-outs of fabric that stray from straight.) Just mark those whoopsies straight.
    2- You now have a line--either marked or woven--that will load to the front roller. Splay all that fabric wrong side up across the rollers with the loading edge at the front. *You do not need to center the fabric.* Did you get that? Don't center--it isn't necessary with this technique. And you don't need to place the fabric under the leveler roller--just throw it over the rollers and let it hang down the back of the frame. Unfurl a foot of the backer leader fabric from that front roller. Reach INSIDE the two rollers, grab the backer leader fabric and bring it up to lay the edge all along the top of that roller. You now have the side of the leader facing you, that you will pin the backer to. Bring the backer fabric towards you so the edge of both backer and fabric are facing you and lined up. Start in the middle and pin to the edge--if there is a selvedge, lay the selvedge so it hangs beyond the leader edge and pin onto the regular weave of the fabric--usually a quarter-inch to a half-inch in from the inside of the selvedge. Pin from the center to the other edge.
    3- Gather all the backer fabric on one arm and pull it towards you. Bring the bundle UNDER the frontrollers in a big circle and push it all under the leveler roller and over the back leader roller. This is just an easier way to get the backer in position rather than stuffing it all between the two front rollers and accomplishes the same thing. Sounds funny, but try it.
    4- Here's the loading secret. Go to the back and pull and straighten all the backer with the excess pooling on the floor. Pull the fabric taut until it is completely flat with the front backer (which will have about 10 inches or so of the leader extending out towards the back) and the pinned fabric is tight. Adjust and pull so it is all smooth and flat. Now it's all smooth and flat, the excess backer is pooled onto the floor-- try to get that hanging as evenly as possible. Go to the front and release the brake while holding the roller stationary. Assuming you have power advance, step on the RIGHT pedal and the backer fabric will be advancing towards you over the roller. The canvas will give the fabric a grip and stay fairly straight as it advances. Load the advancing fabric by slowly rotating the front roller at the same speed. Try to keep the fabric in the stitching field flat. Watch the top of the back roller for bumps and lumps. As these appear, set the brake and even out the bumps by reaching from the front and pulling each edge carefully to smooth the fabric flat. I usually go to the back to do this so I can flap out the backer and help it feed evenly. Back to the front and advance again. The reason this works is you have started with a straight edge which will make the fabric load straight if you are careful.
    4- IF the backer is not square, it will immediately start to show. You will notice that one side is scrolling (loading) wider and one side is scrolling inward. This is OK and you will end up knowing if you have enough USABLE straight fabric to safely load the quilt. Advance, tug, pat, smooth, advance, tug, advance, smooth.
    5-Stop advancing when the backer is just above the tabletop and you can see that the back edge of the fabric is (hopefully) parallel to the table top. Take the excess fabric that is over the backer roller and lift it up and use one pin to pin it to the fabric in the stitching field. Unfurl the backer leader about 10 inches, reach inside and bring the edge up to lay along the top of the roller. Unpin the fabric and bring it up to lay on the leader. Pin to the leader somewhere in the middle and smooth the fabric along the leader. Now look at the sag in the fabric. If there are bias wavy lines, unpin the middle and adjust the fabric right or left until the waves are gone and the fabric looks even. This is exactly the technique you use when you square up yardage. You grab selvedges and hang the yardage down, looking for distortion and waves. Then you adjust the selvedges until the fabric hangs true. You then know that the fabric was not cut on the real grain and you have long triangles of fabric that you remove when you square up. Same thing only on a huge scale!
    Have I lost you yet!
    6- Pin the backer--center/out/center/out. The backer is pinned and you have pushed the leader over the bar and the backer now is a big hammock. Go to the front and remove the sag by rolling onto the BACK roller. Then advance to the front roller. If you have sag on one side, roll back and forth to even it out.
    7- Now the backer is loaded and even. Takes less time to do than it takes to try to describe it! Look at the two front rollers. The not-square backer has scrolled onto the roller. One side is scrolling out and one is scrolling in. Take a quilt clamp or use your blue water erase pen and place a mark on the canvas of the top roller where the backer is NARROWEST.
    The scrolling-out side is easy--mark where the first loading pin is. The scrolling-in side needs investigation--press along the line of pins you used to load and find the first one. Mark there. The distance between the marks is the USABLE width of the backer. You then must decide if that usable width is enough for the quilt top. If it is, use the marks to load the top, centering between the marks, not the edges.
    8-If there is not enough usable width, call your customer and explain. She can pitch a fit at the LQS and get a squared-up replacement, tear-to-square and add more backer, or replace it completely. Believe me, she will be more vigilant with the next backer.
    Pleasepleaseplease don't try to fudge one of these to try to skip the drama of replacing a backer. The quilt will be a nightmare with constant adjustments and will never hang straight--even on a bed.
    I hope this wasn't too confusing. Print it out and try it with a big piece of fabric and it should be OK. The loading technique of reaching in and pinning to the backer results in an edge with all the pin points inside a fold made by the backer and the leader. I have always loaded this way and never have hole in my clothes. Place the pins at the ends both facing in, and you also won't tear a hole in your forearm as you quilt!
    Comments please on whether this is confusing. I will edit or expand on it if there are questions.
  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from CindyT in I got a surprise when I cleaned the edge of the bliss roller brushes   
    Ewwwwww!
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from fabric007 in Favorites from Previous Forum   
    If you like, send me an email and I'll send back some sampler photos.
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Prairie Quilter in "Over the River" but not Christmas-y...   
    Here is an "Over the River" customer quilt done in Fall colors and fabric instead of the pattern sample which has blacks, browns, cream, and grays. She substituted maple leaf applique blocks to continue the theme. It was a lot of fun to quilt.

  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Anette D. in Ferny quilt with fleece backer   
    My sister made this lap quilt for her DH. It doesn't have batting, only a nice thick green fleece backer. It is a bit curled on the edges but we hope the wrap-around binding job will help. Quilted with lots of ferns. I can't get two pics to load so a close-up will be in the next post.
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Myrna Ficken in How do I post my avatar?   
    I was finally able to post an avatar after 7 years!
    Where do you have your photos stored? I had to re-size to 640x480 pixels and then half that before the photo would post. This is from photos saved to my Desktop.
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Zora in NY Beauty   
    Looks like I posted twice! Here's a bit of the quilting. Thanks for looking!
    (Anyone figured out how to delete a post? All I can find is "edit".)

  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from chatty94 in Until Favorites is fixed   
    I'll wait patiently while Dawn tries to find all our lost Favorites.
    Until then, every post that you "Like" is stored on your profile. Like the ones you want to keep so you can find them again.
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from delld in Did we loose our Favorites List?   
    Ditto--only the threads I've replied to recently are in my content. I know Dawn said things might look funny for a while and it would take time to import all the info from the old forum, but...
    Another problem I'm having is trying to change my password and user name. Can't seem to get it to take. I'll give it a couple of weeks and then contact Dawn. Is there just one person we need to contact for these issues?
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from marquetta in NY Beauty   
    Looks like I posted twice! Here's a bit of the quilting. Thanks for looking!
    (Anyone figured out how to delete a post? All I can find is "edit".)

  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to Prairie Quilter in Suggestions Needed   
    Signature block quilted:

  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Tracey in Need ideas for this cool bargello   
    I was going to suggest rays going straight out to the edge of the white--all rays using the center of the bargello to set the angle.
    Then I looked again.
    How about rays that start at the intersection of two of the outside rectangles. (Best to mark first before loading) When marking, place a long ruler on the top right corner and bottom left corner of an outside rectangle and mark to the right until you hit the red border. Each ray will be offset and will continue the spinning of the circle. Use thread to match the white background. I imagine the circle is appliqued on a background so hopefully it is flat and quilt-able without puckers. That can be a problem with rays that extend a long way.
  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to Tracey in Need ideas for this cool bargello   
    Hey Girls...another one for that show in November (I am still working on the Labrynth and will post when done) I know I want to do spiraling feathers in the bargello circle (unless someone has a better idea) I am going to do a rolling feathery tendril thingy in the outer red border as it is quite narrow. Only 4".
    I need some spectacular idea for the white without getting it too dense. Any help would be appreciated.
  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from delld in NY Beauty   
    Here's a scrappy NY Beauty-style quilt. She said everything was from her stash. The colors are more vibrant in person.
    Photo removed by poster--trying to post a different pic on another thread....
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from delld in NY Beauty   
    Looks like I posted twice! Here's a bit of the quilting. Thanks for looking!
    (Anyone figured out how to delete a post? All I can find is "edit".)

  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from delld in Quilt Path!!   
    Lovely! Especially the intricate block design. You go girl and learn it all so we can have you teach us!
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