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ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in batting costs   
    If you are selling batting on a roll, do as the quilt shops do and sell by the length, giving them the off-cuts to take home. I figure out the cost per running inch (like W&W is $.27 per inch) and do the math. I charge full retail so I'm not undercutting my friends at the LQS. If you would like to use the extra yourself,  post where your customer will be writing her check that you will gladly accept donations of batting pieces for your charity quilting. I also sell unusual kinds and sizes of packaged batting. King size wool is a big seller for me.
  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Southern Quilts in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  3. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Trimming Question   
    I never trim a customer quilt, even if there is a massive amount of backer or batting left when finished. I do trim the bottom edge of batting if I need to roll back to do more quilting, since otherwise that extra can bunch up when reversed and cause problems---but I trim so two inches of batting extends beyond the edge. You never know what the customers plan is. She may want to fold the backer to the front for binding. She may want a binding wider than 1/4". If you've used double batting or something puffy like wool, enclosing the edge may take a wider binding to get a consistent width. I've never had anyone ask for trimming and never offered the service. Too many ways it can go wrong, especially if the quilt isn't square. 
  4. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LinneaMarie in Trimming Question   
    I never trim a customer quilt, even if there is a massive amount of backer or batting left when finished. I do trim the bottom edge of batting if I need to roll back to do more quilting, since otherwise that extra can bunch up when reversed and cause problems---but I trim so two inches of batting extends beyond the edge. You never know what the customers plan is. She may want to fold the backer to the front for binding. She may want a binding wider than 1/4". If you've used double batting or something puffy like wool, enclosing the edge may take a wider binding to get a consistent width. I've never had anyone ask for trimming and never offered the service. Too many ways it can go wrong, especially if the quilt isn't square. 
  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from RosemaryJ08 in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Lovemyavy in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from AnnP in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LisaC in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from mamu in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from micajah in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from whitepinesquilter in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Debbie Turner in Selling my Millie   
    You're at the right place. Post the model, year made, serial number, photos, if you bought it new, how much it was used, when it was used last, when or if it's been serviced, what accessories come with it (power advance, stand-along bobbin winder, extra bobbin cases, hydraulic lifts, pantos, thread?), where you are located, and how much you're asking. A perk for potential buyers is the offer to help break down/ship or to deliver within a certain area, with or without a charge. You can ask for messages and inquiries to be posted here or you may post a phone number and/or email address. If you want messages here only, monitor the post. Delete your post when it sells. You can also partner with an APQS dealer to help with the sale. They may have someone waiting for a used machine to become available. You can offer them a finder's fee. Good luck!
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Liam in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from T Row Studio in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LisaC in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Pepsi Girl in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilta93 in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbustle in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from NHDeb in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from appr216 in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

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