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ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from HeidiP in Quilt back will not tighten evenly on each side   
    Trim your backer so you have three inches beyond the top. In your photo it looks like miles of backer to the left. That will always sag because there's no extra thickness of batting and top to load on the roller and keep things level. If the left side still sags when the three layers are closer in size, check that the your rollers are level and parallel. A roller higher on one side will roll tighter, making the opposite side sag. Use a level and a tape measure to determine if the rollers are as they should be. Adjust the eye-bolts that hold the rollers so the same number of screw threads show on each pair. Don't forget to look at the front roller bolts---they come out towards the front. Good luck Jamie!
  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Need pattern for king size on point quilt   
    I'm going to hit you with the math---watch out!!
    A 9 1/2 in block (finished @9") set in an 8 x 9 setting, on point, with alternate blocks the same size, plus setting triangles without any added border (the binding will hit right on the seam intersections) will give you a quilt that's about 100" by 112". Sort of King sized, but usually a King is square, so you might want to think about it. If that isn't large enough, plan a border to make it the size you need, or make more blocks.
     
     
    Using the Pythagorean Theory yada yada math math math, the distance from diagonal corners of a finished 9" block  is 12.72". Sewn together with alternate blocks and 8 across will give you approx. 101". Nine blocks the other way about 114". Use graph paper for a visual for how the blocks fit together. You'll also need setting triangles. These are cut so the bias edges are sewn to the blocks and the straight-of-grain runs along the perimeter, keeping the edges from stretching. The side triangles are cut, four at a time from one big square--in this case a 14" square, cut twice diagonally. The four corner triangles are cut from two smaller squares---and only once on the diagonal, two 7 1/4" squares would work. Here's a link to Bonnie Hunter's chart for determining sizes of squares for setting triangles.  http://quiltville.com/onpointmath.shtml
     
    You'll find many photos and diagrams of on-point quilts on line---try Pinterest. You won't need a pattern. Have fun and good luck!
  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from HeidiP in Need pattern for king size on point quilt   
    I'm going to hit you with the math---watch out!!
    A 9 1/2 in block (finished @9") set in an 8 x 9 setting, on point, with alternate blocks the same size, plus setting triangles without any added border (the binding will hit right on the seam intersections) will give you a quilt that's about 100" by 112". Sort of King sized, but usually a King is square, so you might want to think about it. If that isn't large enough, plan a border to make it the size you need, or make more blocks.
     
     
    Using the Pythagorean Theory yada yada math math math, the distance from diagonal corners of a finished 9" block  is 12.72". Sewn together with alternate blocks and 8 across will give you approx. 101". Nine blocks the other way about 114". Use graph paper for a visual for how the blocks fit together. You'll also need setting triangles. These are cut so the bias edges are sewn to the blocks and the straight-of-grain runs along the perimeter, keeping the edges from stretching. The side triangles are cut, four at a time from one big square--in this case a 14" square, cut twice diagonally. The four corner triangles are cut from two smaller squares---and only once on the diagonal, two 7 1/4" squares would work. Here's a link to Bonnie Hunter's chart for determining sizes of squares for setting triangles.  http://quiltville.com/onpointmath.shtml
     
    You'll find many photos and diagrams of on-point quilts on line---try Pinterest. You won't need a pattern. Have fun and good luck!
  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilt fabulous in Help: Floating Top & not keeping square on frame   
    I'll have to disagree with Lynn. I float exclusively and have never had a problem like Kerri describes. I check for square with every roll and add tension when needed with magnetic bars. Square quilts stay square and un-square ones are dealt with individually to correct. 
  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in How to tell if leaders are square?   
    If your rollers are level and parallel (check with a long level and a tape measure) and if your table top is level (again check with a level) pin your leaders together and unroll and roll back, the entire set at least twice, keeping some tension on the leaders the whole time. Un-pin the leaders and let the take-up leader hang down pooled on the table top. Advance until the edge of the leader clears the table. Is the gap even? Does the edge run in a straight line or does it dip or raise above the table? That's where you can see if the leader needs to be replaced or corrected. 
    Concerning level rollers, you should have the same number of threads exposed at the eye-bolts at both ends of the same roller, if you suspect they aren't level. If APQS installed, they should be OK, but check them. That is usually the culprit with a new machine and new leaders. Good luck!
  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from lym95 in Help: Floating Top & not keeping square on frame   
    I'll have to disagree with Lynn. I float exclusively and have never had a problem like Kerri describes. I check for square with every roll and add tension when needed with magnetic bars. Square quilts stay square and un-square ones are dealt with individually to correct. 
  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Beachside Quilter in Help: Floating Top & not keeping square on frame   
    I'll have to disagree with Lynn. I float exclusively and have never had a problem like Kerri describes. I check for square with every roll and add tension when needed with magnetic bars. Square quilts stay square and un-square ones are dealt with individually to correct. 
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from T Row Studio in Help: Floating Top & not keeping square on frame   
    I'll have to disagree with Lynn. I float exclusively and have never had a problem like Kerri describes. I check for square with every roll and add tension when needed with magnetic bars. Square quilts stay square and un-square ones are dealt with individually to correct. 
  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilta93 in Quilting for show   
    Here's a tip if you want to leave the threads for your customer to knot and bury and keep them out of your way---insert a straight pin next to the exiting threads and wrap the two threads around the pin as many times as they can. They are now out of your way and easy for the customer to find and deal with. Watch out for pin pokes and glass heads pins hold better. The customer can give the pins back to you or you can charge a nominal amount for them. (This way you'll also see how many ends you would have needed to bury if you did them yourself!)
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LisaC in Quilting for show   
    Here's a tip if you want to leave the threads for your customer to knot and bury and keep them out of your way---insert a straight pin next to the exiting threads and wrap the two threads around the pin as many times as they can. They are now out of your way and easy for the customer to find and deal with. Watch out for pin pokes and glass heads pins hold better. The customer can give the pins back to you or you can charge a nominal amount for them. (This way you'll also see how many ends you would have needed to bury if you did them yourself!)
  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Sheagatzi in Quilting for show   
    Here's a tip if you want to leave the threads for your customer to knot and bury and keep them out of your way---insert a straight pin next to the exiting threads and wrap the two threads around the pin as many times as they can. They are now out of your way and easy for the customer to find and deal with. Watch out for pin pokes and glass heads pins hold better. The customer can give the pins back to you or you can charge a nominal amount for them. (This way you'll also see how many ends you would have needed to bury if you did them yourself!)
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from T Row Studio in Quilting for show   
    Some of my customer send their quilts to Houston and Paducah. They can't afford my rates for knot-and-bury and none of them expects an award---just participation. Judges check the back for tension and good stitches. If they find snarls or obvious build-up where the starts and stops are, they will comment. But they don't usually comment unless there's an issue. I'm a tiny-stitches-and-clip kinda girl.That's why I use thin and blending thread in the bobbin.
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to HeidiP in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    Linda,
    You never fail to have the best advise!  Thanks for always taking time to share your wealth of knowledge!
  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LisaC in Quilting for show   
    Some of my customer send their quilts to Houston and Paducah. They can't afford my rates for knot-and-bury and none of them expects an award---just participation. Judges check the back for tension and good stitches. If they find snarls or obvious build-up where the starts and stops are, they will comment. But they don't usually comment unless there's an issue. I'm a tiny-stitches-and-clip kinda girl.That's why I use thin and blending thread in the bobbin.
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilta93 in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    I've done a nice overall design on that size top in three hours from load to unload. I've managed kings in one day---about 6-7 hours.
     
    To get faster, find three or four overall designs that you can knock out fast and offer those. Breaking in a new design eats up a lot of time as you find the best density and pathway.
     
    Please don't push yourself unless the rent needs to be paid with the next customer quilt. Steady is better than frantic---that way lies a long lonely road with a seam ripper in your hand! 
     
    Edge-to-edge is such a moneymaker for most longarmers compared to custom, so concentrate on small steps to up your speed.
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from anniemueller in Quilting for show   
    Some of my customer send their quilts to Houston and Paducah. They can't afford my rates for knot-and-bury and none of them expects an award---just participation. Judges check the back for tension and good stitches. If they find snarls or obvious build-up where the starts and stops are, they will comment. But they don't usually comment unless there's an issue. I'm a tiny-stitches-and-clip kinda girl.That's why I use thin and blending thread in the bobbin.
  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from delld in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    I've done a nice overall design on that size top in three hours from load to unload. I've managed kings in one day---about 6-7 hours.
     
    To get faster, find three or four overall designs that you can knock out fast and offer those. Breaking in a new design eats up a lot of time as you find the best density and pathway.
     
    Please don't push yourself unless the rent needs to be paid with the next customer quilt. Steady is better than frantic---that way lies a long lonely road with a seam ripper in your hand! 
     
    Edge-to-edge is such a moneymaker for most longarmers compared to custom, so concentrate on small steps to up your speed.
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Sheagatzi in Quilting for show   
    Some of my customer send their quilts to Houston and Paducah. They can't afford my rates for knot-and-bury and none of them expects an award---just participation. Judges check the back for tension and good stitches. If they find snarls or obvious build-up where the starts and stops are, they will comment. But they don't usually comment unless there's an issue. I'm a tiny-stitches-and-clip kinda girl.That's why I use thin and blending thread in the bobbin.
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Oma in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    I've done a nice overall design on that size top in three hours from load to unload. I've managed kings in one day---about 6-7 hours.
     
    To get faster, find three or four overall designs that you can knock out fast and offer those. Breaking in a new design eats up a lot of time as you find the best density and pathway.
     
    Please don't push yourself unless the rent needs to be paid with the next customer quilt. Steady is better than frantic---that way lies a long lonely road with a seam ripper in your hand! 
     
    Edge-to-edge is such a moneymaker for most longarmers compared to custom, so concentrate on small steps to up your speed.
  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from HeidiP in Quilting for show   
    Some of my customer send their quilts to Houston and Paducah. They can't afford my rates for knot-and-bury and none of them expects an award---just participation. Judges check the back for tension and good stitches. If they find snarls or obvious build-up where the starts and stops are, they will comment. But they don't usually comment unless there's an issue. I'm a tiny-stitches-and-clip kinda girl.That's why I use thin and blending thread in the bobbin.
  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Southern Quilts in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    I've done a nice overall design on that size top in three hours from load to unload. I've managed kings in one day---about 6-7 hours.
     
    To get faster, find three or four overall designs that you can knock out fast and offer those. Breaking in a new design eats up a lot of time as you find the best density and pathway.
     
    Please don't push yourself unless the rent needs to be paid with the next customer quilt. Steady is better than frantic---that way lies a long lonely road with a seam ripper in your hand! 
     
    Edge-to-edge is such a moneymaker for most longarmers compared to custom, so concentrate on small steps to up your speed.
  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Time to quilt a customer's quilt?   
    I've done a nice overall design on that size top in three hours from load to unload. I've managed kings in one day---about 6-7 hours.
     
    To get faster, find three or four overall designs that you can knock out fast and offer those. Breaking in a new design eats up a lot of time as you find the best density and pathway.
     
    Please don't push yourself unless the rent needs to be paid with the next customer quilt. Steady is better than frantic---that way lies a long lonely road with a seam ripper in your hand! 
     
    Edge-to-edge is such a moneymaker for most longarmers compared to custom, so concentrate on small steps to up your speed.
  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from meg in Are there different thread tension when the quilt is in the frame and when we removed the quilt the frame?   
    I don't think this is correct. While the line of stitching may look like it's buried more when it's off the frame, as opposed to when it's tight on the frame, the actual tension doesn't change much. If the tension is bad, it may be disguised a bit, especially with lofty batting. But if the tension looks good on the frame, it won't change to bad when the quilt is removed. Have you found this to be a problem? 
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from micajah in What is the best pen/ink for signature quilt blocks??   
    A Pigma pen in the color you want will work fine as long as it's heat-set.
     
    I've used these for inking on fabric and they work well without needing to be heat-set.
    http://www.joann.com/dritz-quilting-black-fine-line-permanent-ink-fabric-pen/4792362.html/
     
    These also work well.
    http://www.joann.com/identi-pen-dual-point-permanent-ink-black-ink/9803693.html?green=21F5BBFE-84B2-586E-93D4-49803449AC97
     
    I'm sure you've read this hint before, but back the sig squares with ironed-on freezer paper so you get a clear signature. And if you have time, use a erasable marker to mark the seam line and tell people to sign inside the lines. Sometime people will want to write a long entry and fill the entire block, resulting in part of their writing captured in the seam.
  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in Are there different thread tension when the quilt is in the frame and when we removed the quilt the frame?   
    I don't think this is correct. While the line of stitching may look like it's buried more when it's off the frame, as opposed to when it's tight on the frame, the actual tension doesn't change much. If the tension is bad, it may be disguised a bit, especially with lofty batting. But if the tension looks good on the frame, it won't change to bad when the quilt is removed. Have you found this to be a problem? 
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