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meg_marsh

prices for piecing a quilt????

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Have searched but not finding a good answer.

I am doing two quilts for a customer - start to finish. Know what to charge for the quilting, but what about the piecing. Am keeping track of hours since every quilt we piece is different when it comes to the pieces - some have so many more pieces and take longer to put together even if they might be small in size.

Any input would be appreciated - don't want to overcharge but also don't want to 'give' my time away. I want to be fair.

Thanks in advance!!!

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I've only done a few but I did Time plus materials, and then my standard quilting and binding charges. Depending on how difficult the pattern was my hourly charge would be from $8.00 to $15.00.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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Meg,

My pricing starts at $10.00 a square foot. This includes all materials and services. I would charge 10 for a 9 patch, etc and up from there.

Sandra


Sandra Guilbeau, M. Ed.

Denham Springs, Louisiana

APQS -- Sales.Service.Education

Certified Superior Threads Educator

225-715-5524 cell

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Depends on the level of the piecing. I usually start out at about $1200 for a queen. I haven't ever thought of figuring the hours. Good fabric costs, quilting costs, then what's left over divided by the time you used to piece. I always end up with a lower hourly wage for the piecing. I try not to do much commision work because I make more money quilting.


Merry Jo

Merry Jo Rembold, Julian, CA

APQS Sales Representative

Millie & Quilt Path

Facebook: Creative Quilting by Merry Jo

Merryjorembold.com

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I always thought it was cost of materials than double that (of course that would be for a basic quilt pattern..such as a 9-patch anything more difficult that that would be at a higher price based on difficulty in pattern) than add in your normal quilting fees, binding etc...

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I'm with you Joann. That is how I charge for mine. But I guess I don't think like other people--I have said it before and will say it again. I do not want to screw anyone and love, LOVE making quilts for others and putting their personalities into it and making it so special for them. That to me is the best form of advertising ever. And I get alot of business and I think it is because not only do I do very good work, from the fabric picking to the design--most of mine are orginals--to the fact that altho I do charge plenty, I do not feel I over charge and the people are very satisfied with the end project. I have a "friend" who charged $1500 for a double quilt, her first ever pieced project, and she did not for warn the person before hand. I was mortified beyond words. I would never want to be in her catagory of quilter. People like her give quilters bad names.....

Just my opinion . Judy

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Judy,

I agree with you..I got into this business because I like doing what I am doing...to make $ for what I like to do is the cherry on top!

I would never want to be taken advantage of by someone just because I couldn't do it myself. To over price ones time or skill is just plain greed. Unless the quilt is 100 years old and in mint condition, or an award blue ribbon quilt, quilted completerly in heirloom fashion or using 14K gold thread ;) I could never bring myself to pay or charge more than $1,000 for any quilt. Sorry if this offends anyone but it's my opinion and I feel that there are alot of people out there (in all areas of labor not just quilting) that over charge just because ego or greed. What every happened to an honest days work for an honest days wage?

Is it not greed that got us in this world ecconomic mess we are all in now? Over pricing/ inflating prices just for the pure greed of making more $$ and all the while the quality of the product was less and less. Think about it, how would you feel if you were on the other side being the one asked to pay the price for the individuals greed.

Sorry for the soapbox...it's a sore subject with me these days with the state of the ecconomy.

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So Joann, do you quilt for others plus piece tops? Just curious..went to you web site and checked it out. I would say your prices are very reasonable. I have a full time job and do quilting as an hobby and make a few dollars to buy more fabric, but more out of a passion for quilting. Plus it is so-o-o-o much fun to get others hooked on quilting. I teach an adult ed quilting class so it is fun to watch them get excited about quilting. I do have a George and quilt a bit for others, but do not want to advertise the quilting part. I have 13 or so of my own that are all spray basted and ready to quilt and can't seem to find the time to do them.

Had one lady ask if I wanted to quilt hers because she did not want to pay what the LQS charged--do you think that made me a bit mad? I told her I charge the same. Old bitty has enough money she could afford to pay full price anyway. Heck if I want to do it for nothing, I'll do my own.

Any way, it is so nice to run into someone who feels the same why I do. Thanks a bunch!!!!:)

Have a good day.

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Thank you again for all your responses. I am closer to figuring the price. Want to finish the quilt and figure it a couple of different ways so see how everyone's ideas work out - am not for the highest price, just what I think is fair and in the process coming up with a formula that will work for me in the future.

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Hi!

For the past two years I have been doing sewing projects for an LA based fabric company. During this time, I've done many quilts, but also other projects such as pillows, covering boxes with fabric, and even asked to do some craft design projects (one was for fabric cupcakes that ended up in McCall's magazine). Everything was SO different that after much trial and error, I finally decided to charge by the hour.

I keep track of all of my time...from ironing and cutting the fabric, to sewing on the bindings and hand tacking. It is too difficult to just look at a quilt and decide by size...I've done somethings that were just preprinted panels with borders added...and others are intricately pieced quilts. I am always working with fabric that WILL BE coming out and a lot of the projects are used to decorate the quilt market booths (Houston and spring trade shows) and to showcase the new designer fabric lines as well to "troubleshoot" new patterns before they are made into kits.

So, what is working for me....living in South Orange County, CA is $15.00 an hour. I consider myself a skilled seamstress.

I think your profile said you spend part of the time in CA...and part in Seattle. I think if you are doing a quilt on consignment for someone in the Seattle area, the pricing may be different than what you can charge in So Calif keeping in mind that most who ask that you sew a quilt for them, are not seamstresses, and appreciate the fact that you are. Good luck! Kerry:cool:

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Hello Meg,

I think that Linzi had the same problem with pricing one of her quilts. Someone brought up the pricing as cost of materials and then double.... no one can run a legitimate business with pricing like that!

You have to decide whether you are doing this as a business or whether it is for fun with a few dollars earned as pin money. If it is a business and you depend on the income, then you have to look at a proper pricing structure and decide what is fair to you and your overheads.

Remember, you are using your sewing machine that will have wear and tear and will need servicing, you are paying for your electricity, thread is involved and the list goes on. You need to decide what hourly wage you are prepared to accept and what is required to cover the costs. It is perfectly fair to expect a fair return for a fair effort!!

I wish people would stop devaluing what we actually do. I run a business, with all the costs that are involved with running that business.... I do not dabble in quilting as a hobby just for the fun of it. I am jsut lucky that I love my job! If, as creators of these fine quilts we do not educate the public as to how much time, effort and love actually goes into our products, then noone will ever want to pay what they are worth. It is not a matter of cheating (screwing was the term used above) the public or taking them for a ride, but educating them that we WORK at creating these quilts, with the difference being that we actually LOVE what we do. That does not then entitle someone to ask us to create and get paid less than the ""WOMAN CLEANING THE TOILETS" (I think one of Teresa's comments in another thread).

Meg, I would make a few blocks ie nine patch to a really complex one. Make them all the same size ie 10"or 12" and time how long it took you. You then have a base to show your customer and can let them know that you would have to create X number of these blocks that would take approximately this much time multiplied at hourly rate. It is then their choice as to how complex they go and how much they are prepared to spend. All is up front and both of you know how much the top will then cost to make (approximately).

All the Best,


Susanne

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http://community.webshots.com/user/NeedlesNest

"The Essentials to happiness are... something to love, something to do and something to hope for." - William Blake

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Case in point: I tried using the cost of materials doubled and then charging the standard cost for quilting. I low balled myself horribly! I am referring to the Lone Star quilt that I did for one of the Doctors that I work with. I spent soooo much time on that quilt. I am ashamed of myself for how little I made on it. I'm pretty sure it came out to less than $1 an hour.:P At first, I was okay with that because I learned soooo much doing that quilt. First of all, he could have afforded to triple what he paid me and still not even feel the pinch. Not his fault though, because I didn't ask for more. Problem now is that he spilled the beans on what I charged him, and everyone at work wants me to make them one. I pulled up my boot straps though and explained that what I charged him was NOT my going rate. That it was a learning process that we both benefitted from, but now I know what I can do and I have to be compensated for it. I have no quilts coming in for just quilting (except my Mom's), so I would like to continue to do commision quilts, but I have promised myself that I will not undersell myself, my talents, my time, or my fellow quilters. If they don't want to pay the price, they don't get a custom quilt from Peggy. I truly value the quilts that I create, and so should they. You don't pay for a blanket and get a custom made quilt.

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I have made a number of commission quilts and I figure I make about $10-$15 an hour, as long as I keep the block fairly simple. You can see sample prices on my website (and that's using fabric I already own - if I have to purchase fabric, I charge more for the materials).

I make twice that rate for doing long-arm quilting, but I make a lot of quilts for charity, so I'm okay with doing some commission quilts for not much money. I try to charge in the neighborhood of $13 - $15 per square foot as a starting point. I also try to do an hours estimate.

I figure it takes at least:

1-2 hours to come up with the design and fabrics

1-2 hours to cut fabrics

30 minutes per block for average blocks (make a sample block before you give the estimate and time yourself)

1-2 hours to make the top and attach borders (add at least 30 minutes for each border past the first)

1 hour to piece backing and cut batting

1 hour to cut, piece and iron binding

1 hour to attach binding to front

2-4 hours to handstitch binding to back

xx hours to quilt (I have a chart on my website of average quilting times for complexity of quilting and size of quilt)

It takes me a minimum of 15 hours to make, quilt and finish a twin sized quilt, and often it's more towards 20+ hours.

So - do a serious estimate of how long it usually takes you to do each step, and what type of hourly wage you're comfortable with getting, and charge accordingly. Don't worry about people thinking that's way too much money - let them do it themselves! I would rather only work with people that respect me as a serious artist and business person. If they want cheap, they can go to Walmart.

I completely agree with the people that wrote that we need to charge what we are worth.

Good luck!

Julia


Julia Graves

Special Occasion Quilts, LLC

Leesburg Virginia

240-472-1763

http://soquilts.com

juliagraves82@gmail.com

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Peggy,

It is so easy to short yourself and my main reason for not even considering piecing and quilting, not that I have any spare time! I would explain to everybody that asks that you did that as your test and it was done for a much lower rate because of that. Up your price!

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Last summer I pieced 4 twin size quilts from embroidered blocks and I charged $15/hour to piece and then my normal quilting price. It came out to about $250 per quilt. The piecing was just sashing and borders but I picked out the fabric, backing and put on binding. I did a lot of custom work on the quilts, but it was a learning experience - not sure I'd do it again for that price.

Best of luck!

Sharon


Sharon Whittlesey

Sharon@weinmaninsurance.com

Woodburn, Iowa

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I have tried to price my quilts by charging 5 cents an inch. I multiply the length by the width aand then multiply by .05. I haven't sold any. I have given some away and donated some. I guess they are not good enough. I have a Millenium and also a Mega quilter on the inspira frame. I do alterations for people and do make a bit of money that way. I usually charge $5.00 to hem pants and $20.00 to replace a jacket zipper which seems to be the most common items I work on. I do have a woman who does hand quilting for me when I don't want to ruin another quilt. I pay her 4 cents an inch and the one she is working on now is about 100 by 100 so I paid her $400. Of course I will never be able to sell it for what it cost me for her to quilt it. I will probably give it to one of my children or grandchildren or even my great grand children. I wish I could use that Millenium like I see on the site but it goes where it wants to go not where I want it to go. for $18,000.00 it sjould go by itself.

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I have just started longarm quilting so I am trying to price with what I was getting charged by the shop that was quilting for me. I charge .01 per inch and by the yard for the batting used and $25.00 for the binding and $10.00 per seem if I peice the back. The custom quilts I have been doing for clients have been picture quilts, I charge per quilt size flat rate and then so much per picture size. It seems to be working out oh yes that is plus the cost of fabric which also my time added in. Everyone seems happy.We'll see how it works for me as I get busier. I have made a few quilts for my own sales that are not picture quilts and the are selling but slowly(I don't have my web site yet and I am just learning the longarm and just do freehand for now, tried pantogragh and can't get the hang of it. I will try to post a couple of pictures if I can figure out how.


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Just another thought, when someone asks me to piece a quilt for them, I can either spend my time piecing or quilting...I know what I earn per hour quilting and I will estimate how long it would take me to piece their project, estimate that, times my hourly rate, and give that as an estimate. (If it takes me longer - I stick to my estimate). You only have so many hours in a day and you can either spend them quilting or piecing for someone else (personally, I would prefer to quilt) so I charge the same rate for my time and skills. Some customers are willing to pay me for my time to piece their quilts, others will just do it themselves....I don't want to take advantage of anyone but I also don't want to give my time and skill away either as this is my business...


aedc2cc10e0045c5397509e8f6b74d4d.png

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sewmanyquiltssewlittletime/

Proud Millie Owner!

Sew Many Quilts - Sew Little Time

Custom Long Arm Quilting

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Originally posted by Marion

......I wish I could use that Millenium like I see on the site but it goes where it wants to go not where I want it to go. for $18,000.00 it sjould go by itself.

Marion, how long have you had your machine? Have you taken any beginners classes? If not, you need to contact your nearest APQS dealer and ask for a class. It's one day but you will learn a ton of info. I think you just need a little help and guidance. Lots of people here are willing to help via the Internet. Best wishes to you !!

Shana


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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This summer I took on the project of making memory quilts from my SIL inlaws. I had ties, jeans, T-shirts, pajama bottoms, and woven shirts. Each one of these required a different method to turn the clothing into a quilt. I know you all will scream, but I charged minimum wage for the piecing time, partly because it was a relative who asked for the help, and partly because I couldn't give a good estimate what it would cost to do. I kept track of the hours to disassemble the garmets and cut and sew the new tops. I now have all that data that I can refer to when another person asks- and they have! Looks like I will be in the memorial quilt construction business as well as machine quilting.


Cee K

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