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Hi,

I am very new at this forum stuff, and I think I messed up the first post I tried to do. If you think you already read this question, you probably did. But I can't find it.

I only know enough here to be dangerous.

Here's my question:

Why would you want to float a quilt top? I have never tried this, and I am curious. Maybe I don't really understand what it is....so start with that!!! Thanks so much.

I am starting to get addicted to this site, and I am home for the summer (teacher), so I will be back a lot.

9patch/Linda

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Hey 9-Patch,

I am kind of new myself, I know just enough to be dangerous. When you float a top, you pin the bottom of the quilt to the #2 roller, like always. Then instead of pinning it to the take up roller, you baste a reference line across your batting and backing, then line the quilt top up with your reference line - pinning every 3 or 4 inches to keep it in place - then baste the top down keeping the edge even with the reference line of basing on your batting. (I can't believe I am the one telling you this). Do you have the book "The Ultimate Guide to Longarm Machine Quilting" by Linda Taylor? I have come to live by this book - if it is not within arms reach I begin to panic. Hope this helps, don't try it by my directions, wait until the more seasoned quilters post a reply. Have fun!!

Mary Beth

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One reason to float a top is that your top edge isn't pinned to the take-up leader, so you can quilt closer to the top edge because it's lying flat on the backing and batting. It's easier to control that edge if it's wavy or otherwise needs to be adjusted, too. Once I started doing that, I liked it well enough that I haven't pinned the top to the take-up since.

Mary

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Thanks, Mary,

I am getting ready to load a top that I bought at an auction, one I am willing just to play with. I think I will try floating it. It's lap-size, so it is a good candidate for learning something new. I will let you know how it works out.

Linda/9patch

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Another reason to float a top is that it's easier on your hands. It's hard on your hands and wristis to work with 3 layers and get them all even. If you take Dawn's class you will find she likes to do all 3 at once as it can save some time. I have some nerve damage that affects my hands and found it works better for me to float the take up end. Try both ways and see what works best for you. Jeri

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I have finished pinning the backing and batting to the back canvas. I can already appreciate that it takes less wear and tear on the hands to be only handling the two pieces. I predict that this is the way I will be doing it in the future....if all goes well with this quilt. Very cool to learn something new.

Linda/9patch

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Linda, For me the little extra time it takes is definately worth it I figure it actually saves me down time due to pain, days that I can't use my hands don't make me any money. Back to my quilt, I took days off during the week so am working on Sunday. Jeri

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