steph619

I want a Long Arm

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I have many quilt tops that I can't quilt on my own, but I don't want to send them out to be quilted. I have been doing a lot of research into LA's, and I am astounded at the prices. I don't want to turn quilting into a business, I just want to be able to quilt my own work, and need advice as to which machines I should be looking into. I have machine quilted some smaller, baby quilts, but just can't do the big quilts that are waiting around to be finished. Any advice?

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Hi Steph

Did you take a look at the new LA thats called George?

I don't know that much about it but I am sure if you email some of the dealers on this site they will be able to help you more.

Good Luck

Char


Char Rake

CLR 2 Quilt Longarm

www.clr2quilt.com

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Yes, I looked into George, and I don't think it's the machine for me. When the quilts are large, they get bulky to maneuver, and I don't think I want to deal with all that. If I am going to spend a lot of money on a machine, I would be willing to pay a little more and and get one where I don't have to move the fabric under the needle myself. Thanks for the suggestion though:)

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Guest LA

[

Hi Steph,

Please do not disregard the throat space of "George" he has a hefty space of 20" just like the Liberty!

That is ample room for large quilts.

If you have questions, please let me know George is due to join our family soon! ;)

quote]Originally posted by steph619

Yes, I looked into George, and I don't think it's the machine for me. When the quilts are large, they get bulky to maneuver, and I don't think I want to deal with all that. If I am going to spend a lot of money on a machine, I would be willing to pay a little more and and get one where I don't have to move the fabric under the needle myself. Thanks for the suggestion though:)

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Machine Quilter's Showcase will be held in Overland Park, KS (Kansas City) in May . Come join us and try out all the machines, ask lots of questions, and meet lots of other long arm quilters. Details are at www.imqa.org jeri


JUST QUILTING

APQS SALES & SERVICE

Fil-Tec / Glide Distributor

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I saw "George" at the show in Chicago, and for someone who doesn't want to go into business I think this is a machine to give a lot of consideration to. If I understood correctly, (at least at the Chicago show), the machine comes with the table which is large enough to support even a very large quilt. If you're already used to free motion quilting on a domestic machine you won't have a learning curve when it comes to using this one. The table is large enough and strong enough to set up a regular sewing machine (or serger) at the same time, therefore saving you a lot of space if that is an issue. For most of us, moving a long arm machine into our homes required major juggling, sacrifices on the part of the rest of our family, building new space or moving all together. I love my Millennium, and wouldn't have any other machine. I think the people who choose "George" will love it as well. They'll spend a lot less time paying it off, they won't give up the space in their homes, and they'll have the great service and support from the APQS team.

Good luck to you as you make your decision! If you choose an APQS machine of any kind, with the features you're looking for, I'm sure you'll be happy.

Sue Kelly

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The only down side of George that I can see is that you wouldn't be able to do the pantogragh designs that are out on the market, no laser light. I have really grown dependent on that laser light ;) I even use it to apply my borders instead of marking the top using stencils. Plus I like the idea of not having to pin baste my quilt sandwich anymore as well. Just something to keep in mind as well.

Joann

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I don't know how to post for sure........hope I'm doing this right.

Have you thought about a used machine? There are some listed and you could contact me also. Mine is a gem, but I've developed lymphodema and I am having trouble using my machine.

Barb Doty

Dotys@Centurytel.net

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Hi Steph:

This is Carla -- I work at the APQS showroom and training center in Des Moines, Iowa. I would love to talk with you some more and get you some additional information or literature to consider. We've got a great literature package and a CD-Rom with a short video on it (if you haven't already received it) that I can send you right away. That might help you sort through the different machines/features, etc. Of course, I'm available by phone or email anytime for questions and clarification. Sometimes all the information gets a bit overwhelming and you need someone to just help walk you through it. Give me a call or email me. You know better than anyone else exactly what you need in a machine; I think we just need to get to know you better to help determine which machine might be the best "fit" for you. I'm happy to help anytime! I can be reached at APQS at 800-426-7233, ext. 15 or via cell phone 515-710-7751. My email is carla@apqs.com

Hope to talk with you soon! :)


Gone Quilting!!

Carla Riley

APQS Sales

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I am in i similar position to you. I really bought my machine to quilt my quilts. I kept the cost down (and the size which was possibly more important) by buying a frame from hinterburg and a machine from APQS. I have a discovery which is really the biggest machine I can fit in my small english house.

I wouldn't have bought George because part of what I wanted was to move the machine not the quilt it saves a lot of strain on my now terribly good shoulders.

I should mention I have been told that my set up isn't possible. It seems to work OK to me. Form what I remember and from watching videos I probably have less vibration that some of the official frames, but we are a household of engineers so we were confident about rienforcing the frame had it been needed.

Hope you find a solution that will work for you.

Ferret

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Thank you everybody so much for all your advice. I am still looking, still trying to figure out which will work best for me, and I appreciate everyone taking the time to comment and help me out. If, or more likely, WHEN, I decide to buy, I will post again with my decision. It's not going to be in the near future (tax season killed me), but I am hoping to be able to purchase within the next 6 months. Thank you again!!

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Hi,

Buy yourself a used machine, it's cheaper and for the most part anything that is going to go wrong with the machine already has been worked out by the previous owner. I did! I finished all my quilts and then some and now I am ready to sell it. It still has warrenty and in excellent working condition.

Patches

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Keep looking for a used machine. When you new to getting used to the machine it is best to by one that someone wants to upgrade to a larger size. But then also keep in mind that when you do find a machine that is used, don't limit your ability to do things just because the price is cheap. Keep looking till you find something that you want to work with and keep for a while. They aren't things that you go through like socks.:)

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Ferret,

You do understand what I am looking for. The size isn't an issue for me, I am fortunate that I have a large room in my home that I have turned into my studio, and it can fit the 14' table if I get it. Working on my quilts is my form of therapy, I enjoy it beyond words, and am just trying to work out my quilty feelings of spending so much money on a machine that most people see as nothing more than a "hobby" for me. I am still young, unmarried (waiting for a ring, though) and wanting kids, I can't help but think I should save money for the future. Money is not a huge issue for me, but it's always something on my mind.

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Hi Steph,

Life's too short to look back and say "I wish I had..........". None of us knows what the future holds, so don't put off enjoyment until you think you can afford it.

Now is the PERFECT time to buy a machine! You can use it for your much loved hobby, then when you have children, it becomes a great stay-at-home business. There are great advantages to working from home, many of them financial. And just think. By the time you turn your hobby into a business, you'll have already mastered a lot of the skills you'll need.

Start thinking of yourself as a "Fibre Artist", and you won't feel so much guilt about buying a "TOOL" to help you with your ART. ;)

BTW, my family & friends didn't start to take my "hobby" seriously, until *I* did. :cool:


14EABCCA535C11FE692767BF2F0B87E2.png

DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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Hi Steph,

I have to agree with Darlene, live today. I wouldn't go into debt for a machine but when my partner and I both got made redundant I bought the machine and he went for a weeks training for drag racing. You never know what tomorrow will bring and the worst thing I can imagine is regretting not doing something.

If you like quilting this will be a lot better for you than trying to manage the quilts under a static machine, so it has medical benefits :) and quilting is good therapy.

Stuff what other people say. you have to live your life, a lot of my friends have been very negative about quilting. Apparently it isn't proper sewing, they would rather I stuck to doing costumes. I love quilting and my life has been inproved by me spending more time doing it. . Also as Darlene says my friends are now starting to see my art seriously too.

If it helps any my machine cost more than all the cars we have ever bought put together, and I did stress about the price. I still do when the machine plays up, but when it works, that is a different matter.

Let me know what machine you end up with :)

Ferret

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Darlene's advise about seeing oneself as a "fibre artist" is so wonderful! I, too, am a hobby quilter and 'selfishly' bought a used Liberty a month ago just for me. I am still in the throes of being overwhelmed and so very frustrated that I'm not very adept--I can't follow a panto that even begins to look like the pattern and I almost tear up when I read how others find that so easy. Next week I am going to take a two-day class and know this will ease my start-up frustrations. BUT---I am so happy I finally made the decision and didn't settle for a lesser machine (after all the agonizing and research). In fact, the best part right now is not fretting about what machine to get!!! Carla was extremely generous with her time on the telephone and email when I was struggling with my choices and I urge you to give her a call. And, Steph, money will always be an issue--my kids are grown, I don't work outside the home, and should be saving everything for retirement. But this was for my soul. Best wishes on your decision process!

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To OnTheLAM (love that! :D)

If you're having trouble with pantographs, give me a call. I know I can help you out with some simple tips.

I'm on the West Coast. 604-850-5066.

Darlene


14EABCCA535C11FE692767BF2F0B87E2.png

DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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..for hearing my cry in the wilderness. I am indeed having incredible difficulty with pantographs and am becoming discouraged because I want to get started with something "real". So I will most definitely take you up on the offer to call you, but let me take my class at the end of this month first and see if I can pick up any pointers. In truth, I had barely touched a longarm before this purchase--maybe I'm loading everything upsidedown!! (;). As a personal note, I find your posts among the very most useful and encouraging; I love the pictures of your studio; and I can't believe you left out the fact that Vancouver has the most awesome restaurants on the West Coast! And, finally, on Carla's recommendation, I look forward to ordering your books when I do touch base with you! My freehanding isn't quite so clumsy (but not exactly great).

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OnTheLAM (Can we call you by your real name? ;))

Here are a few tips.

1. RELAX. Just a loose grip on the handles is all you need.

2. SPEED UP! Most people try so hard to follow the line that they go too slow to get smooth shapes.

3. FORGET ABOUT FOLLOWING THE LINE! Just concentrate on making the "shape" suggested by the line. Quilt only from "point to point" in one continuous movement.

In other words, if you're doing a flower, just make the shape of one petal, then the next shape. Don't worry about the whole thing at once.

There are very few patterns nowadays that don't have some "fudge" factor built into them. If you go off the line, your customer will never know. BUT, it's amazing how your nervousness and tight hands can show on the quilt. So again, RELAX! :D

What patterns are you trying to quilt? The ones that look the most simple can sometimes be the most difficult. You do NOT want to start with long curving lines. Shorter distances are accomplished much more easily.

And YES, Vancouver has great restaurants, and mountains, and beaches, and even Palm Trees down by English Bay! Love to sit there at sunset and watch the sailboats in the summer. Spring is definitely here and my rhodos are in full bloom. Cherry trees are just finished and the magnolias have taken their place. It's a never ending garden show around here. Growing up on the prairies in Alberta makes me appreciate all of this incredible vegitation. In over 40 years, I still marvel at it every spring.


14EABCCA535C11FE692767BF2F0B87E2.png

DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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steph619,

Maybe you should try machine rental. There are quite a few Longarm/Quilt shops with machines for rent. It may help you make a decision.


Cheryl Uribe

Livermore, California ~45 miles east of San Francisco

APQS Representative/Educator

Since 2004

Sales, Demonstrations & Education

www.gizmogirlquilts.com

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Hi Ferret,

How are you. I hope all you machine playing up now brings you nothing but joy and smiles. Can't wait to see you quilt pictures when I get home.

So much good advice is give on this topic.

Myrna


Myrna Ficken A Quilter's Choice - APQS West, 5787 S. Gallup, Littleton, CO 80120;  Store 435-414-2026 Mobile 435-229-2703  myrnaf@q.com  www.aquilterschoice.com community. Look me up on Facebook   A Quilter's Choice - APQS West

 

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