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ellsan

10 foot table with Liberty

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I don't understand how to creatively quilt the borders of a Queen or King sized quilt. What would be the widest amount that I could quilt on my 10 foot table. I am very new (2 weeks) and more than a little overwhelmed, with a sprinkling of buyer' remorse. Tension issues seem to be something that plague everyone for the first while. I am just trying to master loading the quilt sandwhich. I understand that there is no really main way of doing it. I watched the Myrna Ficken video, and I liked the way she demonstrated. Is this a popular method? Thanks for alll help. Sandra

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hi sandra -

i know how you feel. but i keep looking at all the GORGEOUS creations these ladies make - and think - if they can do it - so can i!!!! i'm think we will just have to stink at it for a while befoire it all makes sense.

for loading....i have been doing a partial float (that's what my dealer taught me) and it seems to work for me. i am unfamiliar with myrnas video so i dont know what she recommends.

i think to make fancy borders on a smaller table, you may have to load it off to one side. someone else will pipe in here to help you, i'm sure.

for months, i have been reading these posts as if they were the key to eternal life - and if there is one thing i have learned, it's YOU NEED TO FIND WHAT'S RIGHT FOR YOU AND DO IT. everyone has a different way of doing things. of course, i am still searching. just keep at it - that's what i'm doing.

maybe the light will come on for both of us at the same moment.....

meg


Meg

"Do small things with great love." Mother Teresa

"Life's too short to fuss with thread." Meg Fazio

http://theonewiththreadsonherclothes.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/megfazio

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Well Sandra it is not learned overnight. What works for you might not for someone else. If you can get to any quilt shows and take any classes do so. Even taking or watching several videos of the same thing, then all at once it will click for you. As for your tension issues out on the APQS main page, I believe that their are Dawn Cavanaugh, I don't think I spelled her name correctly, has a thing on tension. Start out loose on the top and bottom and work up. See if there is a long arm quilter nearby who would share their knowledge and just give you a little nudge in the correct direction. I couldn't tell where you are, but I'm in Wyoming, and travel thru Utah and into Nevada regularly. If not in that area I'm sure there is someone else nearby.

As for creatively quilting the borders on a 10' table, I can't help you there. I spent all day working on one border I try something, frog it and try again. It has been a long day. So start with something simple and just PPP (practice practice practice). Even when taking classes from the pro's they state that even after your good, practice a minimum of 8 hours a month or more.

I'm sure someone more knowledgeable than me will chime in. Don't get frustrated, when you start to, just walk away, have a pop or a cup of coffee and go for a walk and try again.

Let me know if I can help.

Shirley

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Sandra...check out Shannon's blog post from today. She explains in full written and picture detail how to load a quilt onto the frame.

http://www.piecefulkwilter.blogspot.com/

Hope this helps.


Kristina at website http://withakquilting.blogspot.com/ and personal blog http://froggybottomquilting.blogspot.com/

 

Hoppily quilting along with FROGGER - my Green Millennium, and TOAD - my Liberty. Quiltazoid equipped too!

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How timely is that? Shannon is something else...

Sandra, don't get discouraged. It can be overwhelming at first, and these ladies make it look so easy. And yes, it is for some, but not really for the rest of us. It is all about practice, at least that's what I keep telling myself because I don't get much time on my machine and am getting better at a ridiculously slow pace.

Use up some scraps and make quickie tops to quilt. In the beginning I even bought cheap cotton sheets with 20% off coupons, cut off the edges and practiced on them with different colors of thread on each pass for lots of practice.

Lots of help here...everyone has been there to some degree.

anita

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Sandra,

I can't speak for the 10ft table and what will fit and what won't. I have a 14 ft table. Tension is one of the hardest things to get right. Don't give up though! This is how I do my tension and since I've changed to this method my tension issues are much less of a problem. First I work on the bobbin. I run mine pretty loose. I load the bobbin in the case, hold the case in the palm of my hand and give the thread a pull. What I'm looking for is for the thread to lift the edge of the bobbin case up in my hand but I can't pull it up by the thread. I hope that makes sense. Now that I have that I then attack the top tension. First loosen it up and start to stitch. Your stitches will look ugly! Lots of loops on the top. Now start tightening the top tension a turn at a time and with each turn you will see improved stitches. When you get it close start with 1/4 turns until you get it completely balanced. Cindy Casperson has a great DVD out for new quilters and gives some really good advice. Taking hands on classes will really make a huge difference in your skills and confidence! Don't give up. You can do this! Take it one thing at a time. Pick one thing that you want to work on in a week and do it until you can do it perfectly (or close) and then move onto the next thing. Good luck.

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Sandra,

If you can, start with a lap size muslin quilt sandwich (maybe 60x80) for learning to load on the machine and practice with the machine. That size should have fewer tension problems. And stay away from the thicker threads when you are first learning. It will all come in time and we're here to help. Best wishes!:)


Joan

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I really appreciate all the helpful advice which I have received. I knew it would be a challenge, but really it is intimidating. Today I went to Washington State to a town called Woodinville to have beginner longarm class with Sheila Hooper.

Sheila is an APQS dealer and professional longarm quilter. I had a great day, I learned so much about loading the quilt, trouble shooting tension, thread, batting, and maintenance. She was so gracious to include me in her class, as I bought my machine privately. To be able to teach well is a gift, and Sheila is a very good teacher. Thanks you again to Sheila and her husband for hosting and teaching the class. Her husband is the maintenance teacher and also makes house calls to do servicing. I feel much better. Tomorrow I am going to laod the quilt the way Sheila taught me. Goodnight all.

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