cjtinkle

That WD-40...

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The thought of using WD-40 on ANY sewing machine... much less my expensive Milly, is really bugging me. The stuff builds up and is just plain nasty!

Why do we need to use it? What's wrong with just oil? And if it's for cleaning purposes, how about a silicone base instead?


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CJ actually WD 40 is a degreaser and will take care of all the build up of lint and such. I've never had it build up on my machine and I use it all the time! You have to make sure you spray it into the bobbin area, run the machine good and then clean it out. I usually spray it out with my air compressor. Once that is done then I add a few drops of oil and run it again.

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I was told to use WD-40, so I spray the bobbion area with it...but then wipe it off. I haven't had any build up. It will be interesting to see what others say and especially Mark, Christie or Amy as to why.

I saw Heidi's post...I do as her too.

Honestly, I would think that silicone would leave a build-up.


Kristina at website http://withakquilting.blogspot.com/ and personal blog http://froggybottomquilting.blogspot.com/

 

Hoppily quilting along with FROGGER - my Green Millennium, and TOAD - my Liberty. Quiltazoid equipped too!

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Yep in same sandbox as Heidi and Kristina. Have been using for over 14 years and no build up. If your concerned get a MSDS, but you will find its harmless so you don't need a mask with it. That is unless your just not liking the smell.

Spray on and let it clean the bobbin area and when finished wipe out the excess. No build up and it doesn't get sticky like silicones can if you don't remove every bit of excess.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

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WD-40 is like brake cleaner or adhesive remover. It cleans, and I've never had it build up either. A while back I got an email with a list of all the things you can use it for. It is petroleum based, I think. I also think it is fairly safe to use. I like it cause it cleans out all the oil build up/residue.

So, yea, I'm in the sandbox too!!!:P


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APQS Millie aka Big Baby
www.linneamariequilts.blogspot.com
Sew Batik Associate #1361

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WD-40 is great. Definitely don't be afraid to use it. When I have had a thread stuck in the bobbin area that just does not want to come out, I just spray that stuff in there and in just about a minute the thread comes out easily. Love it.

Jess


Jessica Noonan

Butterfly Quilting Studio

http://www.jessicaquilts.blogspot.com

APQS Freedom SR

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probably because most dsm's are computerized. There are many wires, electrical components in the bobbin area of my Husqvarna #1.


Kristina at website http://withakquilting.blogspot.com/ and personal blog http://froggybottomquilting.blogspot.com/

 

Hoppily quilting along with FROGGER - my Green Millennium, and TOAD - my Liberty. Quiltazoid equipped too!

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Most DSM are made with plastic, rubber, teflon and other materials which can be harmed by lubricants and/or WD-40 type cleaners. Our machines are "industrial" and the majority of the parts are metal and designed to run at high speeds.


Connie
Port Huron, MI   48060
APQS Sales Rep and Educator
Millennium with Intelliquilter (IQ)

"Be a good listener, your ears will never get you in trouble" Frank Tygr


sewsweetgator@aol.com
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OK CJ,

I decided that I'd pose this question to my research engineers and see how much info they can give me. As I expected...a lot! LOL Here are two of the responses:

1. WD-40 was developed for water displacement (WD) and the 40th recipe was the charm. It turns out that it does a lot of other things well too.

If you put large amounts of WD-40 on a surface and let it air dry, it will leave a film behind. I do not think it would cause build up in a quilting machine unless you just kept spraying it on and fibers began collecting on the wet surfaces. As long as you wipe everything down after using it there should be no problem.

2. The official WD-40 web site lists thousands of uses for it. I have always been amazed at how well it works at so many things.

See: http://www.wd40.com/uses-tips/

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This is my favorite use........ Spew Alert!

Removes rollerblade marks from kitchen floors (be sure to wipe floor clean after using WD-40),

Nuh uh, if you've rollerbladed in my kitchen, you think I'm gonna make it easier for you to do it again?

My other fav was that it removes crayon from screen doors...... Interesting.


Love, Light and Laughter,

Abigail

Milennenium Owner since Oct. 08, She's Mai Linn. Pun completely intended.

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This is what Deloa's husband says about WD-40: "Don't use it on your machine!" Yelp, that is what he says. He says aluminum is porus and that WD-40 will get in the crevices and then attract dirt. He says just clean and oil your machine and forget the WD-40. So, that is what I have decided to do. He just "spalined" it good to me.:D


Just Sew Simple Sylvia Blissett APQS Freedom '09 "Stitch" Circle Lord 2010 “"Until one has loved an animal, Part of their soul remains unawakened.”

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He said take it out of the sewing room. Honest, I wrote it down. Everyone laughed when I sucked in my breath!


Just Sew Simple Sylvia Blissett APQS Freedom '09 "Stitch" Circle Lord 2010 “"Until one has loved an animal, Part of their soul remains unawakened.”

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It looks like there are strong opinions out there regarding the use of WD-40 on our machines. Guess we'll have to decide for ourselves whether it's a good thing to do. For myself, I trust APQS to not steer us wrong, and they advocate the use of WD-40 in cleaning the hook assembly - and nothing else.

One question for those who don't use WD-40 - what do you use to clean oil and lint buildup in the hook area? Maybe there are alternatives for those who can't (or won't) use WD-40.


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Barbara Mayfield
APQS Sales Representative & Educator
AND Quilt Path owner!!!

"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang except those that sang best." ~Henry van Dyke

APQS Northwest

1315 NW Mall Street, Suite 4

Issaquah, WA  98027

 

(425) 243-3502

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My friend Gloria was in the class also. I will check with her and see what she understood him to say and see what notes she took.


Just Sew Simple Sylvia Blissett APQS Freedom '09 "Stitch" Circle Lord 2010 “"Until one has loved an animal, Part of their soul remains unawakened.”

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Well, most of you use the stuff and aren't having any trouble, and it is after all what APQS recommends. My husband is a senior mechanical engineer and he says WD-40 should not be anywhere near a sewing machine. When he gets back from New Orleans, I'm going to ask him to be more specific... I never asked him why.

I have an antique Singer (all metal!) and had it totally refurbed, rewired, etc. I was told the same for it, NEVER put WD-40 anywhere near it.

Usually, I trust my hubby's input when it comes to this stuff... but not always. LOL


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I've been using WD40 on my APQS machines for almost 13 years. An easy way to clean it out is to pour rubbing alcohol from the top *(remove throat plate) while the machine is running slowly. I put a little rubbermaid bowl underneath to catch the alcohol, and you wouldn't believe what washes out sometimes!

Then add a drop of oil to the hook and you're ready to roll. BTW, Mike from APQS is the one that suggested I use the alcohol to rinse it out, MANY years ago. He designed the machine and I trust his judgement implicitly, no matter what others say. :P


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DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

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