cjtinkle

That WD-40...

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OK I will jump in here...WD-40 is a solvent or cleaner and we recommend using it on your hook assembly to clean the oil and lint build up you can get in there. Now it is NOT a lubricant so you will want to dry off the hook assembly of excess WD-40 and then reoil your hook with the oil given with the machine. Heck if Bonnie has been using it for 14 plus years and is still going and same with Darlene...then I think it is ok. ;)


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Originally posted by cjtinkle

Well, most of you use the stuff and aren't having any trouble, and it is after all what APQS recommends. My husband is a senior mechanical engineer and he says WD-40 should not be anywhere near a sewing machine. When he gets back from New Orleans, I'm going to ask him to be more specific... I never asked him why.

I have an antique Singer (all metal!) and had it totally refurbed, rewired, etc. I was told the same for it, NEVER put WD-40 anywhere near it.

Usually, I trust my hubby's input when it comes to this stuff... but not always. LOL

Perhaps it's because people mistake WD-40 for lubricant and that would definitely be a problem.


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Millenium

tricked out w/ Quiltazoid

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Remember, our longarm machines are industrial strength equipment. Made from fabricated metal and designed for heavy duty use. This is not a plastic sewing machine that has lots of open areas and crevasses for lint and goo to get trapped inside (as our DSMs have these little hiding places).

Think about this: our longarm machines run at high speeds for long periods of time. Just like our automobiles, the oil gets very hot and begins to get gunky over time. Same with our longarm machines. The machine oil gets old and sticky. The WD40 removes the gunky oil. It is a SOLVENT. A solvent is a cleaner. In this application, WD40 cleans out the gunky oil and debris from the moving metal parts.

I have been respectfully named (by Linda Rech) as the "WD40 Queenie Bee" so as Queenie, I will attest that WD40 is an IMPORTANT part of my REGULAR MAINTENANCE of my machine. I use it often; usually once a month or so, sometimes more than once a month. And, I swear that in the nearly 2 years I've had my machine, I have never ever had any tension issues. My machine always runs like butter and purrs like a kitten. My stitches are always beautiful. I use all types of threads. There is nothing my machine doesn't do for me. I love my Madame Madeleine Millennium and I would never do anything to hurt her. I think she loves me back because I take such good care of her.

Below is my regular routine maintenance for Madame Madeleine Millennium:

1) Remove thread from needle and take up lever

2) Turn on air compressor

3) Turn on machine at a low speed (7 or 8) so it's spinning slow

4) While machine spins slowly, blow out bobbin assembly with air compressor for NO LESS than 30 seconds. While spinning, point the air nozzle in all different angles and directions inside and around the assembly, and up around the needle bar and take up lever to get any lint. This gets air in every nook and crannie. Spinning gets in all of those "spots" where the lint might be hiding, and trust me it likes to hide!

5) Remove bobbin from bobbin case and cup the empty bobbin case in my left palm and blow out the bobbin case with my air compressor for about 20 seconds to get all the lint out of it from underneath the prong thingies (spring).

6) Set a bowl or small trash can underneath the machine to catch WD40 drips

7) While down on my knees so I am at eye level with bobbin assembly, I hold the can of WD40 in right hand and in left hand, hold rag underneath to catch drops (hold rag about 10 inches below) so you don't get rag near the moving parts… (or just let the drips go into the bowl or small trash can directly underneath). Remember to keep this small rag or paper towel far away from moving parts or you will be sorry!

8) While on knees holding rag in left and can in right, and machine is still moving at slow speed, point WD40 nozzle into bobbin assembly and give it a GOOD HEALTHY squirt. Hold rag underneath to catch drops (about 10 inches) so you don't get it near the moving parts or just let the drips go into the bowl or small trash can below.

8) Let it bubble, ooze and spin for about 10 seconds and then give it another good healthy squirt of WD40 and let it bubble and ooze around in there for another 10 seconds or more, it's OK. It won't hurt it one bit.

9) While keeping rag at a safe distance away from parts, slowly turn up the speed of your machine to like 10 or 11 and let the WD40 "spin out" like a washing machine does the spin cycle. Do that for like 10 seconds or so.

10) Stop the machine so it's no longer moving or spinning.

11) Now take paper towel and VERY GENTLY wipe along the WALLS and CEILING ONLY of the bobbin area. You will see some black goo and linty stuff. This is what the WD40 removed.

12) Do not rub around on or inside the actual bobbin assembly. I try to avoid hitting or bumping this part as much as possible. You can gently and lightly wipe the very underneath part where bobbin basket is, but otherwise, no touchy.

13) After you've gotten all of that wiped up and are satisfied, then you oil the bobbin assembly. You can do this while you are still down there on your knees so you can see. I give the bobbin basket a few good drops and turn the machine on slow speed to let it roll around and lube up the hook area nice and good. If you feel the need you can gently wipe the very bottom metal of the bobbin assembly. Don’t touch inside and around the bobbin assembly. Like I said I try not to touch that part too much. I let it be.

14) When you are ready to quilt, rethread the machine, put bobbin case back in and take a scrap piece of fabric and batting and run some stitches along the scrap sandwich to get any residue from the WD40 and or oil so it doesn’t get on the actual quilt.

You are good to go.

PS: Once a month, I do a “super duper” heavy cleaning of my machine. That means, remove the needle plate so I can see down the hole. This is where I repeat all of the steps above except add a few steps:

1) Turn on the air compressor and point nozzle down through the needle/ throat plate hole while machine is spinning to remove any loose lint and goo. Blow around in all different directions, up down sideways, wherever... for at least 30 seconds. (I have the RulerMate mounted on my machine so I just take it off like I would the needle throat plate.)

2) Grab your friendly can of WD40 and spray down through that hole aiming for the parts you see moving around. Give it another good healthy squirt just for good measure. While you're at it, spray the bobbin assembly too since it's gonna need it.

3) After it’s bubbled and oozed around in there, turn up the speed to spin out

4) Turn off machine and wipe up any spray or lint or goo you see

5) Turn machine back on slow and while spinning, grab bottle of machine oil and point it down through the needle plate hole, give it some VERY HEALTHY drops of oil where you see the parts moving. You will begin to hear a “happy purring” sound. :) (it kinda sounds like the machine is saying "Yum yum yum yum yum....) :D

6) Give your bobbin hook a few drops of oil too.

You are done.

Sorry this is so long...


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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Queenie Bee,

Thanks for the great directions. Seems impossible to have a question after that, BUT I do. The manual says to blow out the bobbin area with compressed air after spraying with the WD40. I don't see that you do that. I find when I do it gets all over my thread cutter and is a pain to get off. Thoughts?


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2005 Millenium

blair8904@comcast.net

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Originally posted by blair8904

Queenie Bee,

Thanks for the great directions. Seems impossible to have a question after that, BUT I do. The manual says to blow out the bobbin area with compressed air after spraying with the WD40. I don't see that you do that. I find when I do it gets all over my thread cutter and is a pain to get off. Thoughts?

Well you could use the air compressor or a can of compressed air to remove the WD40 but I just use the "spin cycle" method of getting it out of there by turning the machine on high speed for a few seconds. Then I wipe all of the lint and goo with a paper towel.

After all that is done, I get a clean paper towel with window cleaner or rubbing alcohol and wipe down the outside area of my machine and thread cutter plate to get it shiney and clean.

(I actually have the ruler mate mounted on my machine so I can't see my thread cutter plate unless I take the ruler mate off to do my monthly super clean process.


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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Originally posted by Darlene Epp

....An easy way to clean it out is to pour rubbing alcohol from the top *(remove throat plate) while the machine is running slowly. I put a little rubbermaid bowl underneath to catch the alcohol, and you wouldn't believe what washes out sometimes!

OK I am intrigued by the rubbing alcohol "rinse" so I am going to do it this weekend!

PS: I am sure this alcohol "rinse" should always be followed up with a healthy dose of machine oil from the top too. :)

Thanks, Darlene! ;)

Shana


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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You're welcome Shana. ;) Did I forget to mention oiling afterwards?? NEVER forget the oil!!

I once had my Liberty get VERY noisy in a class I was teaching. The tension went from great to terrible. All I did was add a few drops of oil to the hook assembly, and the noise AND bad tension stopped. Never underestimate what a few drops of oil will do! And be VERY thankful that our machines have been engineered to minimize the amount of oiling we have to do. :cool:


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DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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I just have to add my 2 cents worth on this thread....

After attending Darlene Epp's class in early 2002, her advice was using WD-40 for cleaning, and following with rubbing alcohol, dry, add oil......BEST ADVICE....

I've faithfully used this formula and my Millie runs like it was still brand new....Thank again Darlene for this invaluable advice....!!!


Linda B.

Central Oregon

APQS Millennium

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Darlene, thank you for the suggestion. The method makes perfect sense. In the Navy I did a lot of precision welding and brazing, we first cleaned the metal with freon (liquid) or alcohol to ensure there was no dirt or oil on the surface.


Connie
Port Huron, MI   48060
APQS Sales Rep and Educator
Millennium with Intelliquilter (IQ)

"Be a good listener, your ears will never get you in trouble" Frank Tygr


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http://www.yoursite.com
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This has been most enlightening! I couldn't agree more with the powers of oil. It can turn a machine from a beast into a purring kitty.

Thank you all for the feedback. I will try the rubbing alcohol, and I believe I now feel quite comfortable using Wd40 on my Milly!:D


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I have been doing a WD-40 cleaning and then oiling every day when I start quilting. My machine doesn't get as much use as most as I only quilt for myself, my sister, and a few charity quilts. Am I doing the extra cleaning too much? Should I just use the air compressor every day and a monthly super cleaning?

Pamela

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There really isn't a time when to clean could be a problem. If what you do is working, continue. I deep clean at the start of a new quilt and blow out and oil often till done. Then a deep clean the next quilt. I do believe I will be trying out this new step...thanks Darlene, it sure does make sense.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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Hi CJ,

The few times I have used WD-40 to clean the bobbin case and assembly area and then oiled afterwards, my machine has not stitched well. I don't know why, and have never figured it out. Both on my APQS Ultimate II and my new long arm as well....So, I've quit cleaning with it.

I know my sewing machine guy uses alcohol on a Q-Tip to clean some sewing machine parts, and he also uses WD-40 at times.

I just use the alcohol now---I would like to use the WD-40 as every one seems to have positive comments, but my experience has been just the opposite. My machines simply do not like being super clean I guess! Sort of like my house! Grin!

My long arm stitches great without the super cleaning ---so I'm not messing with it.

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