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ahorsley

What do you do in your quilt group?

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Our church has a quilting group that meets once a month. We are trying to get organize for next year and I'm looking for ideas. What kinds of things do other quilt groups do? We have a diverse group...some are true beginners while others are very advanced. How do you meet the needs of everyone? I would love to hear what you do in your group?

Thanks

Ann Horsley

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Our guild had around 180 members so it is a very formal group. We follow the exact same agenda each month. Announcement (who is sick or in the hospital, introduce guests or new members), reports (# of walker totes that went to hospital, who picked up children's quilts, etc), a guest speaker (could be a regular guild member or outside guest) who tell of a new technique or pattern they recommend, and show n tell (members line up and show quilts they have finished). Our meetings last from 9:30 until 12 once a month. Members usually get there 30 minutes early to get refreshments and visit. Somewhere in the middle of things we take another break to get more coffee, run to the restroom and visit some more. Our guild is broken into 12 groups who each take a month to bring breakfast goodies and such. Hope this helps.


Just Sew Simple Sylvia Blissett APQS Freedom '09 "Stitch" Circle Lord 2010 “"Until one has loved an animal, Part of their soul remains unawakened.”

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Our guild is at the other end of the spectrum from Sylvia's. We have 12 members and have a very informal meeting. We have an unelected leader (the alpha female) who helps us make decisions and move forward but nobody really"runs" things. We meet once a month from 10:00 to 3:00 with a break for lunch when we do show and share and any business type items are discussed. We do plan a program for each month where someone who has found a cool new pattern/tool will share it and we can chose to work on that project or simply work on our own projects from home. No pressure to keep up with the Joneses or make items you really have no interest in. We span the gamut of quilting experience , so if someone gets stuck or needs help with a project, there is usually someone that can figure it out and help.Once a year we bring in an outside teacher to do a workshop, again taking the class only if you want to. We do a couple of quilt shop road trips a year when the weather is nice and those are usually not on our meeting days. We are planning a weekend sewing retreat for in the spring for the group and a few of us are carpooling to the show in Cincinnati in April. Fun times-No pressure-Good friends-Sewing and Sharing-No parlimentarian with Roberts Rules!

Sally

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My friend and I used to have a quilting group that met every Saturday at our church. At the beginning of each six month period we would put forth several proposed projects, small quilts, new technique to work on etc. and then the group would vote. Whichever project got the most votes we would work on. It worked well because everyone could work at their own pace and the more experienced ones would help the beginners. Of course, as one of the leaders, my projects are still PIGS as I was too busy helping but it was so much fun. I really miss the companionship and the laughter. And because it was a church group we also had a small Bible study with our stitching.

Sally's group sounds fun. I especially like having a workshop and sewing retreat idea.


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Bekah

Shepherd's Garden Quilting

APQS Sales Representative

APQS Millenium

www.shepherdsgardenquilting.com

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Hi Ann,

Ask for ideas from the members.

If the beginners would like an instruction day for perhaps piecing accuracy, piecing with triangles, paper-piecing, etc, it is fun and exciting for the more advanced members to instruct. Perhaps do this twice or three times a year.

My large guild does an instruction meeting once a year where there are six stations--each with a member/volunteer who shows a favorite technique or favorite tool. The group divides into six groups with a 15 minute visit at each station. You rotate around the room and learn new things or remember techniques you may have forgotten. It is great fun!


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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In 4 years our church quilting group has grown from about 4 to 24 ladies, ranging in age from 58 to 87. We finish up to 35 quilts each 2nd Thursday. Most of our members are not quilters or even sewers but tie knots. About 5 piece the tops at home, and we recently started cutting fabric into kits of 8" blocks to sew 6 across and 10 down. We've added the 1st Thursday for nonedible sandwiching, when we cut the batting and backing and match them to the top, so we are all ready to tie on the 2nd Thursday. What really made the difference is a potluck lunch on the 2nd Thursday. We rob from our own stash, got a grant, get some money from our church, and rely on contributions for fabric and particularly sheets, which we use for backings. A couple have become quilters in this process, but we enjoy each other's company and laugh a lot. Every 2-3 months we load up a van and deliver quilts to our Minneapolis metro shelters, and we always add lunch and a trip to a fabric shop in this outing.

Sharon Roos

www.roseofsharonquilting.com

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Our group is about 25+ gals, and you are encouraged to bring friends. We all work on our own quilts but assist with projects and share what we are doing, then teach that pattern or technique to anyone interested. I've learned so much in the last few years.

You sign-up to provide refereshments and coffee for one meeting out of the year. We meet twice a month. .Here's an example of how we informally help each other out: I'm making hot pads for fund raising. One gal cut the kits, another ironed the pieces, another put the block together, then others did the binding. It was a group effort, very informal. Often donation quilts are a group effort with those that like to cut helping out there while others do bindings. This is to help out one member that may be working on a quilt that will be a comfort quilt. Again, informal but amazingly friendly - we all make sure to gather around together when we have out lunch. (sew from 9 - 2)


Kathy A

Liberty & Millenium

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Wow, you gals have great ideas. This is very helpful. Our group runs from 15-25 and like I said is very diverse in experience. It's somewhat structured but certainly not Roberts Rules. Once we get into the project at hand it becomes pretty informal. This past year we had a different project every month. Several of the ladies didn't complete it and once they returned home and let it sit several days, weeks, month....can't remember how to finish. Other projects were doable in the meeting. I appreciate your suggestions.

I must share a funny story about Roberts Rules. Many years ago when my children were in elementary, I became the PTO president. I had one of the other PtO moms (whom I had never met) drill me on whether or not I was well versed in Roberts Rules of Order. I didn't even know who Robert was. Needless to say, I bought a book and tried to bone up on the "rules". We did not become best friends!

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