PattyJo

Do you require a deposit on quilting.

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After reading DeniseinWisconsin's recent post on getting paid, it caused me to question what I do on my intake visit with my customers.

I've had many that wanted to know if I needed a down payment, and I've always said no, that (jokingly) I would hold their quilt for ransom. So far I have not had anyone not get here to pick up their quilt within a day or 2 after I call them.

My question is DO YOU REQUIRE A DEPOSIT and if so 1/2 or 1/3 or ???


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APQS Millennium with Smooth M&M Wheels

Pat Noonan Design Studio, Custom Quilting

503-559-9686

pjnoonan@ymail.com

We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

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I require a deposit plus I have a quote sheet written up with all the information and have the customer sign it .... I give her a copy. This keeps my business professional and have not had problems. I do this with my friends also, so there is no miss understanding.


Rebecca 

 

Northern Illinois

 

www.whitebydzine.blogspot.com  

 

If you want to touch the past, touch a rock. If you want to touch the present, touch a flower. If you want to touch the future, touch a life.     Michael Bernoff

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Since I started my business last April, I am running into many different situations. I thought I had my intake form cloes to perfect, but each experience teaches me I still have a lot to learn yet.

If the quilting is to be a pantograph, or a long board, it is easy for me to give a quote. X amount per square inch times the total square inches of the top. But, for custom, I have a hard time. I keep track of the hours I spend on every quilt, and plug that into MQBR and it tallies the amount I make per hour on each quilt. I am not making much on custom quilting - anywhere from $6.00 to $9 or $10 per hour. I need to figure a better way to quote these prices. Instead of charging by the square inch, I am considering to change to charging by the hour. Any thoughts on this idea?


Sandra Darlington

Darlington Quilts

2005 APQS Liberty, Circle Lord Enhanced

sandradarlington@aol.com or

DarlingtonQuilts@Gmail.com

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I try to get a close ball park on custom quilting and require a 50% of that figure with the understanding that this is just an estimate. On the square inch quilts I do the math and get a 50% or better deposit. I have had people put off picking up finished items till they are ready to get up off the money so by charging a deposit I don't fell so bad about the wait.


Quilting Joyfully,

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Joyce Coburn

APQS Sales,Service, Training

EdgeRider Wheels Dealer

joyce@coburnsquilting.com

www.coburnsquilting.com

330-310-7346

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Now, remember, I only quilt for others part time, but.....no deposit here. Here is why: If the customer doesn't pay, the quilt is mine. I don't want her to own 1/3 of it. The issue was discussed on here a few days back. I thought the problem was that the customer brought too many quilts at once. that can put a crimp in the customer's budget. I will take 2 at a time for a customer. She can bring me two more when she picks up the first two.


Just Sew Simple Sylvia Blissett APQS Freedom '09 "Stitch" Circle Lord 2010 “"Until one has loved an animal, Part of their soul remains unawakened.”

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Hi Pat--I do not require a deposit, but there are always situations where you think it isn't necessary and learn it would have been a good idea.

At intake we discuss designs and price with just an estimate only. Locally it doesn't seem to be a standard to ask for some money up front. I'm with you--I have custody of the quilt and they will need to pry it out of my hands with some $$$!

The only problem I had was a customer who was "too rushed" before Christmas so would I mind dropping the quilt off at her workplace? She unfurled the quilt with all her co-workers looking on--oooing and ahing. Oh gosh--she left her checkbook at home!:o She would catch me next week at Guild. No way was I going to embarrass her and snatch the quilt back in front of all her friends..... It took until the end of April to collect.:mad:


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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Sandra - Determining a cost/estimate for custom is a problem that I don't really have a handle on either. I quote at least 2 cents per square inch and up depending on how much they are asking me to do. The intake sheet says on it that it is an ESTIMATE and if it takes longer than I think it should or I run into problems (wavy borders, D-cup block, etc) then the finial price will be adjusted but will try and call them before so that they are aware. So far I haven't had to do that more than just a $5 or $10 increase.

Rebecca - I do have an intake sheet that we go through with all the information that I need, the finial Estimated price and a place for them to sign and date it. I then make a copy for them to take with them, and I keep the original to work off of. I've done this since the first quilt I quilted for someone else. I've modified my sheet as I've discovered I needed additional information to do a good job for my customers.

Thanks to you all for your input.


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APQS Millennium with Smooth M&M Wheels

Pat Noonan Design Studio, Custom Quilting

503-559-9686

pjnoonan@ymail.com

We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

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Originally posted by sandradarlington

If the quilting is to be a pantograph, or a long board, it is easy for me to give a quote. X amount per square inch times the total square inches of the top. But, for custom, I have a hard time. I keep track of the hours I spend on every quilt, and plug that into MQBR and it tallies the amount I make per hour on each quilt. I am not making much on custom quilting - anywhere from $6.00 to $9 or $10 per hour. I need to figure a better way to quote these prices. Instead of charging by the square inch, I am considering to change to charging by the hour. Any thoughts on this idea?

If you are just starting to take in custom quilts, consider the first year to be a break-in period. The low hourly earnings can be looked at as education expenses!;) You will get faster, have more designs to draw from, and be more comfortable in several months. At that time, you will make more because the education you just gave yourself will get the quilt finished faster. Then, raise your custom prices. You will be worth the price because of what you learned and feel better making more than minimum wage!

Hourly rates are hard for the customer to understand unless you give them something concrete to hold onto. Per inch pricing gives them a ballpark figure--if you say the quilt is 100 X 100 and you charge 2 cents per inch, they leave with $200 flashing in their brain. With hourly, you are stuck estimating how long it will take you --which is impossible for me to do--or even keep track of diligently. Also--if you tell them you charge $25 an hour, some customers find that hard to justify. (They don't realize the overhead and tax implications of business owners.)

I figure custom is not a big money-maker, but my customer showing their quilt around and recommending me will bring me lots more customers for the easier and more profitable quilts.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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I usually ask for a deposit from first-time customers, especially from people I have not met before. Also, I have found that for people with limited budgets, it is easier for them to pay half down with drop off and the balance with pickup, and they seem more comfortable with it too.


Joan

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Thanks, again, Linda from your "words of wisdom."

I do have my prices all written down, by the square inch. As you said, I can see where an hourly rate would "throw" a customer. I will stick to my per sq inch structure. And, you're right, by keeping track of the time it takes me to do certain types of custom, I should get a better idea during my first year in business of what per sq inch rate to quote them. I have my custom as $.03, $.04 and $.05, etc per sq inch. I am the one who can quote them which of the per sq inch cost it will be. I just always am afraid to scare them away by charging too much, so I always low ball the cost. Then it takes me longer than I anticipated, so that figure is really low. But, I am learning! I think I just need more confidence, and that will also come in time. Thanks again for your support and sharing your knowledge.


Sandra Darlington

Darlington Quilts

2005 APQS Liberty, Circle Lord Enhanced

sandradarlington@aol.com or

DarlingtonQuilts@Gmail.com

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Originally posted by PattyJo

After reading DeniseinWisconsin's recent post on getting paid, it caused me to question what I do on my intake visit with my customers.

I've had many that wanted to know if I needed a down payment, and I've always said no, that (jokingly) I would hold their quilt for ransom. So far I have not had anyone not get here to pick up their quilt within a day or 2 after I call them.

My question is DO YOU REQUIRE A DEPOSIT and if so 1/2 or 1/3 or ???

No Patty, I never take a deposit, unless its an out of town customer that I will need to ship back and forth... when its a local quilter and I have control of the quilt till its picked up, I just joke with them and tell them I have your quilt, and you can't have it back till its paid for. Most are grateful that they don't have to come up with a certain amount right there and they have a few weeks to get it all together. Have gotten burned a couple of times, but was always the same person...she would bounce her checks. When I figured out her style I would deliver the same day she got paid and would take the check to the bank same day and get cash...now if she sends me something out here in NY I make her send a certified check before I ship it back to her.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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I've just started doing a few customer quilts from people in the area and I don't ask for a deposit. Most are people I know, but recently I've gotten a few referrals from unknown quilters and I didn't require a deposit. Some have asked if they needed to pay when they deliver it. I haven't gotten burned, but if it happens, I may change my policy for first time or unknown people.

Most LA in our area do not require deposits.


Darlene S

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Guest LA
Originally posted by Bonnie

Originally posted by PattyJo

After reading DeniseinWisconsin's recent post on getting paid, it caused me to question what I do on my intake visit with my customers.

I've had many that wanted to know if I needed a down payment, and I've always said no, that (jokingly) I would hold their quilt for ransom. So far I have not had anyone not get here to pick up their quilt within a day or 2 after I call them.

My question is DO YOU REQUIRE A DEPOSIT and if so 1/2 or 1/3 or ???

No Patty, I never take a deposit, unless its an out of town customer that I will need to ship back and forth... when its a local quilter and I have control of the quilt till its picked up, I just joke with them and tell them I have your quilt, and you can't have it back till its paid for. Most are grateful that they don't have to come up with a certain amount right there and they have a few weeks to get it all together. Have gotten burned a couple of times, but was always the same person...she would bounce her checks. When I figured out her style I would deliver the same day she got paid and would take the check to the bank same day and get cash...now if she sends me something out here in NY I make her send a certified check before I ship it back to her.

Oh Bonnie,,, I can relate!

I had a customer/"friend" bounce a check several times, never paid when she said she would, for months I carried her debt. Finally told her I could not quilt for her anymore unless she had the cash! Funny thing though, while she said she was strapped for $$ I saw her in the quilt shop buying many yards of fabric! Go figure, I told her she was lucky I wasn't a Chinese restaurant that would post bad checks on the wall for all the world to see!!!! LOL :P

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Linda A - I'm still chuckling here. So far, I've not had any bounced checks or any problems collecting from my customers. But if I do, maybe I'll put up a bulletin board in my dinning room to post those bad checks on! ;)


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APQS Millennium with Smooth M&M Wheels

Pat Noonan Design Studio, Custom Quilting

503-559-9686

pjnoonan@ymail.com

We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

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Hi - interesting thread!

Yes, I ask for a 50% deposit. Had a difficult experience early on when a lady ordered a quilt which I made from scratch, but she didn't follow through due to very difficult family problems - very understandable and she felt bad about it - but still not very helpful to me! Yes, I still had the quilt - but I would rather have had the cash! ;) So since then I have always asked for 50% at the time of order and no one has been horrible about it. My paperwork shows the terms clearly when they bring the quilt - we discuss what they want, I give them a written quote and they sign it, take a copy and leave me the deposit :)

With local people I know who maybe want to have a quilt done but don't have the cash to hand - I also am prepared to take part payments on the understanding that I start work when the quilt is paid for. It's been easier for people to find $20 a week than to pay a big chunk. I don't do this with distance quilts and I only do it with people I know and trust.


Ani :) Devon England www.anicatt.co.uk

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Generaly, we do not take require a deposit - pretty much the same as Bonnie - we joke that the quilt is ours.

If we quilt via the mail or for someone out of state, we only accept credit cards or send them a Pay Pal Invoice- works very well.

Cases where we take a deposit- 1) A quilt where I am making it from scratch and then I collect enough to cover the fabric and batting, plus a little more.

2) Some one that brings us a quilt top they bought on Ebay or at an auction, we do not know - they do not have an emotional or a large financial interest in the top - so we then require at least $50.00 down or 50% which ever is more.

This is interesting !!!


Jane and Dave (Grasshopper) Brown APQS Dealer,Quilt Design,Piecing,Long Arm Quilting Custom Racks, Wall Hangers, L.A. Clips, Millie and Lenni front Laser Brackets, Sundries. www.countryquiltsncrafts.com Randolph, Wisconsin

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LOL! Well I think that non paying customers in general are the RARE situation. Most of my customers are my guild members and a few others here or there. I think that if I were doing a lot of long distance (shipping quilts back and forth) business then yeah i would probably have some sort of prepayment plan. But I must say in all my 3 years I have not had a problem. I think rather than go crazy overboard with the negative expectation of non paying customers, consider this a very rare isolated situation. It's completely up to you, though, but really I tend to be leaning more relaxed and ask for payment after services are rendered, just as many other businesses operate. In other words, don't let one bad apple in the bunch spoil all of the good apples.


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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Shana - I think that you are right. I haven't had any problems so far so I'll keep doing it the way that I do now. I've had people ask if I want a deposit, so somewhere they have had to do this before - maybe not for a quilter, but when they hire someone to do a job of some sort for them. I like it better when I have that carrot (called $$$) dangling in front of my face. :D

Thanks for all the input here. I know that we all have to do what we think is the right thing for each of us. Maybe this will change in the future, but for now, I'm going to keep on keeping on!;)


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APQS Millennium with Smooth M&M Wheels

Pat Noonan Design Studio, Custom Quilting

503-559-9686

pjnoonan@ymail.com

We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

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PS: Hey, PJ. I watched Extreme Makeover last night and really enjoyed the show. :) What an awesome accomplishment! I am sure it was an expensive project to build the school for the deaf, but I sure hope that this show aims more toward these types of things (assisting special schools or other buildings) rather than building a huge gigantic McMansion type home for a family that is Far-Over-The-Top-Waaaay-Too-Big-Top-Of-The-Line-Home. Cuz seriously, did that family really need that DEEE-luxe home?? Hmmm...no probably not. Probably just need a nice house to live in, not anything extravagant. Some of these families are not in the best financial shape, so considering this, can you imagine the property taxes and high energy bills (air cond or heat) that these families have to pay on their new huge homes? I know that the extreme makeover home in my town was far too big for that family and the mom (head of house) really struggles to stay afloat maintining heat and all the $$ involved with keeping a large home like this.


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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Shana - I agree wholeheartedly. In fact I had quit watching the show a year or so ago just for those very reasons. Just a couple of side notes on the show. The metal room with the lamp with chains on it and the center ceiling light was made by my dear friends son & grandson. The grandson is 13 and he designed the lamp. And his dad did the ceiling light that rotates and as it does so the lights change from white to blue to yellow, red, green, etc. and it is all out of metal as well. And their daughter in law was in one of the clips for about 2 seconds. This morning one of the local TV stations were broadcasting from there and talking to a lot of the suppliers and the main contractor. The new boys dorm that Extreme Home makeover completed will only house 4 boys at this time, but the plans were designed to be able to add on additional sections as they can afford it. They are hoping to sell tickets to the Haunted House each year and add on as the money is made available. They want to build it up to a total of 44 boys. The community businesses has really come together for these kids. And many (those darned capitalists that everyone wants to complain about) are sponsoring the money needed for rooms so that more rooms can be added right away.

It makes a persons heart happy to see this example during such hard times.


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APQS Millennium with Smooth M&M Wheels

Pat Noonan Design Studio, Custom Quilting

503-559-9686

pjnoonan@ymail.com

We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

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Guest Linda S

I've never asked for a deposit, and I'm naive enough to send quilts back without being paid if they are long distance. I've always gotten paid, but I suppose there will be a first time when I get stiffed and will wish I weren't so trusting.

Linda

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I don't get a deposit, and I ask that people picking-up their quilt at the quilt shop -leave the check (or cash) there. Then I can pick it up the next time I am in town. Usually works, some people like to mail me the checks, which takes longer.....

How about this..... I have had a little baby quilt - that was a big RUSH "Can you do the binding too?" since May of 2008!!

At what point does this become mine??? She did call me out of the blue 2 weeks ago asking about it. Right now she is low on the funds - yes, we all are.

My husband said I should ask her if she wants me to just donate it to some auction/fundraiser in town and neither of us loose out.

Needless to say - I have not started her huge King size quilt (backing needs to be made too) and will NOT do so without $$$ down. She brought them both to me at the same time.


Judi Olson

Garden City Quilting

Love my Millennium!!  :wub:

" ~ Aspire to Inspire before you Expire ~ "

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Originally posted by Judi

How about this..... I have had a little baby quilt - that was a big RUSH "Can you do the binding too?" since May of 2008!!

At what point does this become mine???

I my neck of the woods, it would become mine 60 days after I get a return receipt with her signature from the certified letter I sent her--telling her she had 60 days to pay for the job or I will sell it to recoup the cost of the quilting. Just like the repair shop who gets to sell your repaired car if you can't afford to bail it out.:cool:

This is a final, last last last resort when all else has failed--offering to take small payments or bartering for example.

And you are so wise not to start the next one for her!


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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Oh Linda - you are such a wise woman. And you say such stern things with a smile in your words. Amazing friend. Yes you are ;)


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APQS Millennium with Smooth M&M Wheels

Pat Noonan Design Studio, Custom Quilting

503-559-9686

pjnoonan@ymail.com

We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

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