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So I am a new quilter. Been quilting for only about 3 months, but sewing all my life. I currently do craft shows to sell my children clothes I design and sew. The last show I did I took some of the quilts I have sewn in the past month. I don't feel I am experienced enough to charge a great deal for my quilts (I'm still learning and making mistakes as I go). What is the going price for quilts and what should I charge? I have been quilting baby blankets and throw size quilts.

Here's a sample of the latest quilt I did.

post--13461905040605_thumb.jpg

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Hitomi don't sell yourself short. Remember that once your name and reputation get out there it will get harder to raise your prices. I would do an analysis of costs including materials and time. Determine what you want to make an hour including the cost of your machines. Wear and tear on your machines cost $'s too. Cute quilt by the way.

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Hitomi. Isn't it all in the eye of the beholder? I think your price is your price and they will pay if they really like it. Won;t find one anywhere else. Let them like it, pay your price for it, then share there love for it with others and that's free advertising. Then watch yourself getting More people looking for and buying your quilts. You go girl!!!!!!!

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That's a beautiful quilt! If there's a fisherman in the family, they'd love it. I was always told to figure your costs and double that. However $34 is ridiculous for that quilt. You have to decide what price you'll accept for the quilt. Then once you start selling, you'll have a better idea what people in your area will pay for a quilt. However, I would never put a low price on a quilt just to sell it. I would gift it or donate it to a charity.

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You already have people that will pay your present price for the work you are doing. Don't go lower and cheapen the work you do. The quilt is very nice. If you have been sewing for a long time, the finer points of quilting won't take you long to master. A lot of the quality of quilting (when doing the piecing) is the same as the other sewing you have done. And you already know what is good quality in stitches for the quilting. Keep on as you have been.

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If you charge a reasonable price for your hand-sewn garments, and they sell well, do not discount the quilts. A standard seems to be $100 per square yard for a commissioned quilt, so ballpark for a 44" X 60" generous baby quilt might be $204.

Obviously simpler patterns and overall quilting will get you a better hourly wage. But nothing matters if they don't sell at your asking price.

Good luck and let us know how things go for you.

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Madelyn & Linda are right, as usual. You already know that your customers like your work. Your quilting is beautiful (you learned from the best, right?). Your materials are top quality. Your quilts will sell, do not discount them. Go in to the store & look at what Karen has for sale; I don't remember the size of that quilt, but I think she'd price it $225-250 when finished. Granted, they do not sell very fast at that price, but they do sell. If you want to push them faster at craft fairs, you can offer a "special", but don't do that with any really elaborate quilting. ted

I used to charge $100/sq. yd. for custom-made quilts (still do I guess, since it is still printed on my brochure), but materials are going up. From recent discussions on this forum, I am seeing that the going rate on the Mainland is now closer to $20-25/sq. ft. That would be a hard sell here, but you could start there.

Your fishies are adorable.

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