Made in ? Check your quilting things.


Recommended Posts

Hi Chat Buddies:

My friend wrote a note on the topic of choosing to buy things that are made in the USA and that it would cost about $64 per year more per person to make that choice to buy only USA manufactured products. Apparently Diane Sawyer did a special where they checked everything in one family's home for manufacturer origin and eliminated everything from another country leaving the house nearly bare.

So I checked a few of my sewing things and discovered that my favorite Olfa green cutting mat is made in Japan, Sulky KK2000 Temporary Spray Adhesive is from Germany, the Superior needles are from Japan, hand stitching needles from England, Japan, and others made in China but inspected and packaged in England. My favorite needles come from a Japanese woman who lives in Australia, has them made in Japan, and sells at Houston Quilt Festival. The Mulqueen give-away-6"-measuring tool is made in the USA. I have scissors from all over the place and have purchased them because of their performance. My Mettler thread is from Spain, Superior thread for my longarm from Japan, the glowing pink measuring tape from England, Pellon fusibles manufactured by Freudenberg made in the USA (toured their filter fabrics plant in the south years ago - fascinating), OmniGrid tools made in the USA, fabrics designed in the USA, printed in Korea, packaged in the USA, silks from Thailand, China, oriental fabrics from a variety of countries including Indonesia, Japan, China, batiks from Asian countries. The little wooden roller to press seams was made in the USA and I love the design and feel of it in my hand. My Rowenta iron is from Germany. My Husqvarna Viking sewing machine is from Sweden, the Samsonite case to carry it is from China (used to be made in Denver, CO). My APQS longarm is mostly from USA though could have parts from other countries. Crystals and beads are from many different countries and I love the choices. Cotton batting made in USA. Cotton is one of the top five products of Arizona. Learned this while making the Arizona Centennial Quilt. Alpaca is made in USA and the company is located in Michigan at the sister's house to our guild's speaker last year. I have yet to use it. Heard it is really hot sleeping underneath alpaca because of the tubular shape of fibers.

The conclusion is that I couldn't buy only Made in the USA in order to be a quilter, unless I were from another period of time and did hand work on flour sacks. I am dependent upon the variety of machines, tools, fabrics, and more to make wonderful quilts which even though these things are international, the actual quilter, me, is in the USA, at least most of the time. So I guess I would have a house full of quilts if Diane Sawyer came and took away all my manufactured elsewhere things. The world is a better place for quilters since we have such a large variety of wonderful things to use from the larger community of quilters and needle artists. It seems that even though some of the initial products we use may come from other countries, we quilters are international, are able to communicate with stitches, and share a wonderful love of quilting with or without borders.

Vicki

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you, Vicki, we do live in a global economy now. There is one point I'd like to make, though. I try to buy from owner-operated and smaller companies, rather than larger corporations. I think the world is a better place when people have more control over their livelihoods.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by gable428

I may be "wrong" in the eyes of some people, but I don't pay too much attention to where something is made. Also, in this economy, if I can find something online that is cheaper than it is being sold for at my LQS, I'm going to get it online.

Then don't be surprized when you run down to your LQS for a spool of thread and she has gone out of buisness....

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Linda S

Unfortunately, quilting and sewing related items stopped being made here long, long ago. This was very apparent when we visited MQX East when it was still in Manchester, NH. The Radisson, where the conference was held, is smack dab in the middle of the housing units that were used for the workers in the fabric mills in town. The mills are now empty or taken over for other purposes, and the housing has become nice little condos. Very sad. My mom used to work for a textile place in Shelton, CT. It closed down while I was still a kid.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting narrative. I had no idea and paid no attention to where sewing things are made. I, too, really like to support my LQS, in fact I supported her a little too much last year! I love my LQS, she always has new cool stuff and really great sales. Her marketing talent is amazing as well as her quilting talent. I am not above ordering a few things on line occassionally, but most of my fabric purchases are from my local LQS. The quality of the fabric is so much better than the fabric in the chain stores.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by Ardelle Kerr

Originally posted by gable428

I may be "wrong" in the eyes of some people, but I don't pay too much attention to where something is made. Also, in this economy, if I can find something online that is cheaper than it is being sold for at my LQS, I'm going to get it online.

Then don't be surprized when you run down to your LQS for a spool of thread and she has gone out of buisness....

Then thank goodness for the internet. Let's face it, for those of us who quilt as a hobby, it can be expensive. If I can find an item online that's $20 cheaper than at my LQS, where do you think I'm going to buy it? That is just my opinion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It IS a global economy & I feel that's a very good thing. I also feel it's important to support your local community & businesses. My town has merchants that I'm happy to shop. I can hardly wait for the farmers markets to open so I can support them with beautiful, fresh & local product. I also feel that we are all affected by what happens in the world. There is no them or us, we are all one human race. Compassion & understanding with a sincere desire for goodness for all, I feel, is the answer in my heart for me...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone in this world has to make a living! It is a fact that it is a world economy. If you shut the door to any area long enough, and cause them not to have a viable economy you will produce discord and eventualy war. Think about it. My people (Native Americans) say "All my relations" that includes everything and everybody. Spread it around girls, here, there and everywhere. Just my humble opinion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I support my LQS (she has sent lots of customers my way over the years) and I plug her shop for batting and backing as well as spend some of my profits there. But her shop is only so big and she can only carry so much so yes I also do quite a bit of online shopping as well, they are just as much in need of business as your local shops, plus I am always happy if I can get stuff at a great price.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...