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LadyLake

How to Relax Quilting Pantos?

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I'm currently quilting a panto on a king-size quilt. I keep finding myself hunched over and tightly gripping the handles, and even though I remind myself to relax, it doesn't take long to be back to the same tight position. Then I'm sore and need to take a break. How do you all keep yourself from tensing up when quilting pantos?


Joan

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just keep practicing! the more you do the less 'tense' you'll be. I do find that my right hand will be gripping that handle a bit harder than I like, so i've taught myself to quilt with my right hand on the left handle and my left hand resting on the bar. For most pantos, this works for me. When I am 2-handing it, i just remind myself to relax that right hand every so often. I haven't found myself tensing up per se ... just keep on doing them and it gets easier and easier. Just glide along doing the panto-shuffle!!

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Try holding the handles with only your fingers. I also like to quilt pantos to music and then my mind will wander and before I realize it I am at the end of the row. The more you do the easier it gets.


Just Sew Simple Sylvia Blissett APQS Freedom '09 "Stitch" Circle Lord 2010 “"Until one has loved an animal, Part of their soul remains unawakened.”

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WINE

actually, i don't do pantos, but wine works for freehand so why not pantos?

& the red stuff is medicinal....

at least that's what i keep telling myself.

hiccup...hiccup

:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D


Meg

"Do small things with great love." Mother Teresa

"Life's too short to fuss with thread." Meg Fazio

http://theonewiththreadsonherclothes.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/megfazio

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It helps me to relax by wearing my cordless headphones and listening to music or the TV while quilting. I know when I don't wear them that I am a bit tense, probably from having to listen to the noise of the machine.


172E5699814AA0BAD1AC9516853F905D.png

Susan

Suzy Q's Quilting

Millennium

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Originally posted by meg

WINE

actually, i don't do pantos, but wine works for freehand so why not pantos?

& the red stuff is medicinal....

at least that's what i keep telling myself.

hiccup...hiccup

:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D:P:D

Hahahahahaha, that is the first thing I thought of also.


Gail

APQS Millennium

http://community.webshots.com/user/QuiltFaerie

"If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible warning -- Catherine Aird"

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I use a cervical collar around my neck when I quilt to greatly relieve shoulder and neck pain. It has made a world of difference for me. Be sure to get the correct fit, if you get one or it may not help as much. I would get so much pain in my shoulders and up the back of my neck that I would get a headache and have to stop quilting.

The collar makes it possible to quilt longer, especially when using pantographs or boards. It supports your head and relaxes the muscles so they don’t knot up and cause pain.

Becky

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I struggle with that also. It just seems to happen as I go along...I get closer to the end and get tense.

I try to slow down and breathe!!

Sorry I have no advice for you. Even with music, it happens. I did go the wine route once...worked great!


93D3401EDCAC006390BBEF1ABE1F4C5D.png

APQS Liberty

Circle Lord

North West New Jersey

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I actually quilt my pantos one handed. I am standing to the left of the machine and I hold onto the left side handle with my right hand and I hold onto the take up roller with my left hand. This keeps me looking right down at the panto as I go, not looking over to the left with my head turned. It's much more comfortable for me to do it this way. I keep my right elbow tucked in tightly to my body so the arm is rigid (pretty much) and I can guide the machine easily. I've always done it this way and it works well. I could never get used to two-handed guiding the machine. I like standing to the side and moving along with it.

Oh and music is nice, too.


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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I raise my machine so that my elblow bends at a 45 degree angle (much like the height adjustment for working from the front of the machine). I use only my righ thand on the machine and do find I rest my left hand on the top bar.


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Kelly Summers

Prairie Sage Quilts

prairiesagequilts.com

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I make "Myrna-like sounds". Anyone who has had classes with her knows what I'm talking about...kinda between a whistle and a shush and follows the movements of the pattern. LOL.

Like Shana, I stand on the left and only use one hand. Music is always helpful, but wine...not tried that.

Anita

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Switch up the music, stand to the left, right hand only, left hand on the backing roller and do the "panto shuffle".


Lyn Crump   Hand Guided 2013 Millenium Blissed and Gliding    APQS Sales Rep SE Qld Australia   www.busyquilting.com.au   On Facebook and Instagram as BusyQuilting


Attitude is everything - So pick a good one!

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Watch Myrna Ficken's Beginning Longarm Quilting DVD. Everyone on this board encouraged me to just relax, etc. but I still was clutching those darned handles and driving as if I were in a Grand Prix car. Then I got Myrna's DVD. She actually demos quilting a panto. Oops, she says, missed that line. Quilt Quilt. Oops, missed that line. etc.

The next one I did, I didn't stress about missing a line by even quite a bit, as long as I hit the tops and bottoms so my rows would line up. When I took the quilt off the machine, even I couldn't tell where I had missed, and the customer thought it was wonderful. Since then, no stress other than getting the darned quilt loaded square and keeping it square - but the stitching - no problem.

I also took Myrna's advice to stand a bit to the side. And just holding the handles with my fingertips. But the thing that made me stress was that fear that the quilt would be "ruined" if I missed the line by 1/2 inch. Not so.


Bonnie

(and Amazing Grace)

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The best advice I got, right off the bat, was that it was more important to be smooth and even than accurate. Jerking it back into place when I got slightly off the line would be eyecatching, whereas simply trying to land the next "point" often won't be noticeable.

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Like Meg, wine is good and a shot of your favorite hard stuff is good too. When I started back in 1994 I use to drink a bottle of beer to get relaxed. It kind of warms the blood and lets your muscles unwind. zeke............:cool:


C9A05C30E468F98BDBF3AA2DFD951ECF.png

by the hour.........................

APQS Ultimate I/Compuquilter

Millennium

ztrbrg@yahoo.com

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I do what Shana does, one handed, and try to be so conscious of standing really straight with shoulders down.

Stretch and roll after each pass or in the middle,

I even try to do Kiegels to keep my posture straight and it takes the stress off my shoulders!!!

Joanne Flamand

Artistic Quilt Design

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Try keeping your elbows at your sides...hands lightly holding the handles (I also only use my thumbs and index fingers on the handles), instead of moving your arms, sway your body to some enjoyable music...and you will find yourself relaxing more and your movements will be much smoother.

I haven't done a panto in awhile..but used to only do pantos & this worked for me.


Margie Campbell

Campbell's

http://www.lmcam1.com/

(under construction)

NuStyle 227 & Tin Lizzie 18 LS

Visit my Webshots Albums

http://community.webshots.com/user/margecam52

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I use the right hand on the back of the machine and the left hand on the handle. The right hand kind of helps to push the machine.

I have a problem moving down smoothly. I had surgery on my left foot and for some reason I can't get that foot moved in time to move smoothly. I have to stop each time to take a step. Does someone have a hint for that?

I'm hoping the Bobbin Cam and working right in front of the machine will help since I will leading on the other foot.


Debbie Zerkel

Debbiez Quilting

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I started setting a timer for every 30 minutes when I was having knee problems. This reminded me to take a break. Now my knees are fixed but I still used the timer for breaks. It helps a lot when quilting.


Barb Iliff

Freedom SR

Winding Ways Quilting

"When your life falls to pieces make a quilt!!"

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