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How to SID?

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I have a little quilt mounted, and am ready to try to SID. I have DeLoa's LIttle One. But as usual, I have a newbie question:

So far, I have "SIDed" two sashing seams. I found that I can't actually stitch IN the ditch as I can with my DSM, but stitch as close as I can to the ditch. I'm holding the ruler on the "low" side of the seam. Is that the way other people do it?

I've got my stitch length set at about 10, and am using Monolon on top, So Fine in the bobbin. I am amazed at how invisible this thread is! Much better than the YLI or Superior Monopoly - both of which have a sheen I don't care for. Because I am going really slowly and stop frequently I have broken the top thread several times, but I think as I get so I can go at a slow steady pace this will not be a problem.

However, I'm spending so much time rolling around under the machine looking at the seams, finding the bobbin thread and clipping it, etc. that I'm thinking I need one of those mechanics dollys. My DH has one down in his shop. Maybe I'll "borrow" it.

As usual, I'm eager for words of wisdom.


Bonnie

(and Amazing Grace)

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Bonnie, my only suggestion is.....after using the small SID ruler, purchase Deloa's Castle and see how that works for you. I put my itty bitty up cause all I use is that castle. Love it.


Just Sew Simple Sylvia Blissett APQS Freedom '09 "Stitch" Circle Lord 2010 “"Until one has loved an animal, Part of their soul remains unawakened.”

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Bonnie

Are you not pulling the bobbin thread up with the top thread to tie off on top? You should not have to look for the bobbin threads underneath. What you do is come to a stop then push the machine head away from where you stopped about 3 or 4 inches to get some slack in the bobbin, then bring the needle back to where you stopped and put the needle back down while holding the loose top thread and when you bring the needle back up you can pull up the bobbin thread and clip it. I am not sure if this makes sense or not it is kind of hard to explain without just doing it. But you take a few tight stitches once you stop and then when you bring that bobbin thread to the top it is already locked in.

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I also prefer Madeira Monolon to Superior's Monopoly.

I run it "sloppy loose" on top or it breaks. I know that

you are using an expanded base with that ruler, right?

I think we all have favorite rulers. Try several until you

find one that feels good in you hand. The only other

thing to do successful SID is moving s-l-o-w.


Linda Card

APQS Chat Member since August 2005

Ramona Quilter Longarm Quilting Service (Retired Dec 2013)
Gammill Optimum Plus (sold to a friend Dec 2013)
Ramona, CA (Moved to Central Texas Sep 2014)

My webshots site: http://community.webshots.com/user/legcard (not active)
Blog site: http://ramona-quilter-big-dream.blogspot.com/ (not updated in months)

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. Philippians 4:13

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Jeanne,

The reason I'm rolling around under the machine is that my top thread has broken, and my thread cutter doesn't work. I've been cutting bobbin threads using the technique you describe, but when the top thread breaks in the middle of the quilt, pretty much all you can do is get under the machine to find the bobbin thread to trim it off. Otherwise, it eventually catches on the carriage - or at least that has been my experience.

I do have an expanded base, and after I sent this email, I tried putting my ruler on the high side as well as the low side. I think I agree with those of you who said that you use the high side. It somehow does seem to work better.

I have a little bit more SID to do on this quilt. I'll try loosening the top tension a bit, and try my stitch length at 12, as Heidi recommends.

So far I only had to pick out one area about 6 inches long. The rest isn't perfect, but it isn't too bad - or at least I was okay with it when I covered up Amazing Grace and came in the house this evening. Perhaps tomorrow I'll end up taking some out and redoing it.

I'm having SO MUCH fun learning how to use this wonderful machine. I just wish I had more time to spend!

Thanks for all your help - this forum is just the greatest.

Bonnie


Bonnie

(and Amazing Grace)

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Bonnie,

You can fix the thread cutter. It is likely just dust clogging it up. Have you tried to blow it out well? You can take the cover plastic cover off and get right down in there. Make sure the washers are still in there to give the cutter a space to work. If after cleaning well it still won't work email Amy and she'll tell you how to fix it.

As for cutting threads on the backer. Just give a tug to the upper thread and you will see the bobbin thread peak up. Put a needle in the loop and give a pull and you'll pull that bobbin thread right up to the top. No crawling under the quilt required.

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On the topic of clear threads, I noticed Superior Threads has made changes to their MonoPoly. The clear is now a matte finish and the smoke is now not as dark. One important difference between nylon threads and MonoPoly, is that MonoPoly (to quote Superior Threads) "is polyester and therefore is dryer safe, won't yellow, won't go brittle over time, & can be ironed on a lower heat setting. We suggest using a Polyester Invisible Monofilament thread over a Nylon monofilament (which as a lower melting point) for these reasons."

I don't know what Madeira MonoLon or the other clear threads out there are made of, but I only use Madeira MonoLon for wallhangings or show quilts, because I don't think it is strong enough to hold up on a functional quilt, instead I use MonoPoly.

On the thread cutter, Bonnie, you can slightly tighten or loosen the tiny screws to adjust the two razor blades. It is finicky, and if your machine isn't new, you may need to replace the tiny flexible washers as well. As Heidi said, Amy will guide you thru the process.


Joan

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On the thread cutter, I have heard also that over time it isn't a bad idea to replace that blade, it can dull over time...if the little arm is pulling the thread up to it but it doesn't cut.


aedc2cc10e0045c5397509e8f6b74d4d.png

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sewmanyquiltssewlittletime/

Proud Millie Owner!

Sew Many Quilts - Sew Little Time

Custom Long Arm Quilting

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Hi Ladies

Thank you all for your words of wisdom on SID now I will try your tips. My Millie is new of this year and my thread cutter does not work the greatest either sometimes it does most time it doesn't. I have no thread or dust build up and haven't been able to figure out what to do. Could someone tell me who Amy is as she seems to be the one in the know about this.

Thanks a bunch


Susan

2011 Millie Owner with Bliss

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susan -

amy is the problem solving longarm guru. she works at apqs in iowa and she teaches all the maintenance classes. she can fix things just by listening over the phone.

if you call apqs and ask her her - i bet she can help!


Meg

"Do small things with great love." Mother Teresa

"Life's too short to fuss with thread." Meg Fazio

http://theonewiththreadsonherclothes.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/megfazio

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