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I am in the process of getting the purchase underway. I guess with any sizable transaction, a little bit of second thought creeps in. I had it with the decision to buy, just overwhelmed by how big a thing I was getting into. But that was very short lived. The reason?? The awesome support of everyone here on the forum. When you just want to make sure about something, throw it into the arena of the forum. You will very quickly see the support that is here, and soon realise you HAVE made the right decision to buy a machine, and before you know it, you WILL be quilting for customers. You wait and see.:)

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Hi Diane,

Congratulations on your purchase, you will have a load of fun getting to know your new machine and you may just find that the clicky group of quilters will be happy to welcome another like minded soul, there is something magical about longarming and quilting and patchwork in general that just brings people together in a wonderful way, this forum is a prime example of that.

Happy quilting

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Diane, you're not alone - not by a long shot!! When I got my first used Millie, almost five years ago, I found so many more chores to do around the house, just to avoid that scary, scary machine! I think we've all been there, some at the beginning, some after a time away from our machine. Hang in there and know that you're just beginning a wild, exciting ride!

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I just purchased a used Millennium right before the holidays (oh Santa thought I was really good this year!) I have had no remorse what so ever. I've been on cloud nine since then! The first couple of days I was a bit worried, but knew it was going to take some time and I saw improvement every day. I'm still improving, but having so much FUN doing it!! I'm like you, I'll be quilting for myself and a few friends, I just want to have some fun and man I am!! I'm certain you'll enjoy yours just as much. I remember how scary it was and that feeling leaves pretty quickly once the install is done and you're moving that beautiful machine across the fabric, even if it's just practice fabric.

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Congratulations on your new purchase! Give yourself and the others a chance. It will take a few days to become comfortable with your machine. Don't pressure yourself, just take it slow and let it be fun. *But don't just look at it --use it) Ask questions here as this is a great group that loves to answer and help others. If you have given yourself and the quilters in your area a reasonable period of time to work together and you and your machine some bonding time but then still don't think this "quilting thing" is your "thing" then just tell yourself "I gave it a good try and it is only a machine--it can be resold." I doubt you will sell it unless it is to move up to a bigger or better or newer model!

Welcome and enjoy!

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Welcome Diane!

Your mood line on your profile says it all--"Happy when quilting". Well, you are going to up that happiness level like you won't believe! This forum is your lifeline, and I am not exaggerating. Encouragement, kudos, problem-solving and hand holding supplied happily here! We're all thrilled for you because we've been where you are now and know what's ahead for you. Hang in there and keep us posted as you progress.

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Loose the guilt, quickly! You are going to have so much fun you are going to wish you had done it years ago....My husband and I were out last night at a business functon of his , and I overheard him several times telling assoiciates about "my quilting machine and what I can do" he has been such a supporter for me this last year it has been great. And I absolutely love what I am doing! You will too.

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Congrats on your new purchase. I can't say I had any remorse but I had another machine that was not nearly as expensive but it let me get my feet wet to decide if I really liked machine quilting. I have so enjoyed my machine and enjoyed the creativity of it. Don't put too much pressure on yourself and enjoy getting to know your machine. Allow yourself the time to make mistakes too! The forum is always here to help you out.

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Welcome Diane,

You are just feeling a little insecure and overwhelmed, believe me it will go away once you get your machine set up and start stitching and find your mojo! I am a member of a guild with about 4-7 other long armers here and there are several other la'rs that are very friendly and several that have yet to speak to me after all this time.... The important thing is that you are doing what you "know" you love to do, do it well, find your special niche, and you will have customers if building a business is what you want to do. Keep learning to do new things and when others see what you can do, they will want you to quilt for them too....

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Diane: The most important thing you need to know is that anything that comes out wrong can be corrected. Whatever problem you encounter can be fixed. These are industrial sewing machines, engineered to perform. You'll need to do adjustments to the machine-sometimes in the middle of a quilting session. Don't get discouraged. Study tension adjustment. Learn how to time your machine. Start by using a single thread combination. Sew with it until you feel you have mastered your machine. Changing thread can be a challenge, so don't do it until you're comfortable with using your machine. Learn how to adjust the machine for your beginning thread combo before you move on to others. Examine both the cone thread and bobbin thread stitch results as you adjust the tension so you learn what happens as you make adjustments. Read your owners manual. Read the posts here about stitch problems and tension issues. Make sure the table is set up properly, and check the wheels on the machine. There should be no run out what so ever in them. If there is, you'll get less than perfect results. When you're ready to correct this problem, buy some after market wheels. You'll be amazed at the improvement. Good luck, and enjoy! Regards. Jim

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hi diane -

you are gonna love it!

you are in the right place for support and help - this forum is the best place i have found. the talent and willingness to share knowledge is like nothing you will find anywhere. that being said...

i had a bit of remorse when my machine first arrived and was sitting in the box waiting to be set up.

but once she was set up - and i remembered just how much fun it was, the remorse was gone. i'm over 2 years with my LA and i still don't tell many people about it. i just quilt for myself and occasionally a friend or two who are excellent piecers. my attitude has always been that i do this for enjoyment, but i keep the option of quilting for others "quietly open" in my mind.

congratulations on your purchase, be patient with yourself til you figure out how LAing will fit best into your life!

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:) Thank you all so very much!!!!! I have been reading this forum for over a year. So many nice people and helpful hints. I have been using a Juki on a old old Handi Quilter frame and have been very limited. About 15 years ago I worked in a friends studio who had a Nolting without a stitch regulator. So now my dream will come true tomorrow.
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Welcome to the forum.

You are starting out just as I did. I bought my first machine to quilt my own quilts....but I did not follow this forum at the time, and I can tell you that I hated my machine for two years. I didn't get to know it, I couldn't master tension, I got frustrated and didn't understand the basics. Luckly for me I went to a meeting of local longarmers all of which I knew from my area. There happened to be a national instructor teaching a class the next day at the APQS showroom. She watched me quilt for 2 minutes, had me shut off the machine turned the machine speed up and told me to take off. Whala I loved my stitches. That was 7 years ago, and one machine ago. I love quilting, but I love this site......I still find answers here.

So make sure to check in here frequently. Remember that the only dumb question is the unasked one. And I hope your local Longarmers will take you under their wings. If you have the opportunity to take a begining class it won't hurt that is for sure.

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Welcome, welcome. We have all been right where you are. You have been given wonderful advice by everyone above. I would just add that you already have a great background in quilting and you will be up and running in no time. It may take time to build up a customer base if that is what you want, but don't get discouraged. Word will get out about your talent and you will be as busy as you want in no time. In the meantime, just enjoy yourself and your new machine and be sure to check in here with any questions and post pictures please.

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Diane

This is common, I think. We are all taught to be frugal and not want too much. But in the grand scheme of your life, there is nothing wrong with just 'going for it' once in a while. At the end of our short stay, I doubt you will look back and say " Gee, I wish I hadn't bought that machine!"

Keep us posted on how things go along. I was nervous about my Millennium too, but it is a workhorse and easy to adjust. I bought it in 2006 and have never had a problem I couldn't fix.

Sylvia

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Congrats!

Ha, ha – buyer’s remorse - try nervous breakdown!

In August, 2011, I sold my Grand Quilter (which I had for 5 years), ordered my Millie (Grace) and left for Spain, for 17 days with 90+ teenagers. Needless to say, I did not have time to think about "it" until I returned from Spain.

We returned from Spain on August 26, Grace arrived on August 27, and that is when I had a total "break down" (not really, but you know what I mean). The lady came to pick up "her" Grand Quilter on August 30, and I cried and cried. It felt like I was losing a limb!

When Grace arrived, my son and I set her up. I put my first quilt on her and quilted. I cried again because the only difference I could really see at the time was how I had so much more room to quilt. Why did I spend so much when my other machine did just fine? (FYI - I never named my first machine.)

Before I purchased the Millie, I gave myself 5 years to pay it off. I now have added an extra year to pay for all of the "candy" I have added (pantographs, Circle Lord, thread, lights). To date I have quilted 34 quilts - only 7 were for paying customers. My 5 - 6 years looks like 10 - 12!

BUT .... I love Grace and would not want to be without her. I may not quilt every day, but I do pass by her daily and just touch her. I may never pay her off with customer’s quilts, but just quilting for myself and charities will be enough for me.

Please don't tell my hubby!!!! LOL

Enjoy your machine and thank the Lord that you are able to do something you enjoy - what a blessing!

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Guest Linda S

It's completely natural to have the feelings you're experiencing. I remember that for weeks before the machine was delivered, I would lie awake nights alternating from being over-the-top excited to thinking 'what have I DONE?' Any large expense like this is scary. But I have the best time now when I'm quilting. Every once in a while, when I'm rocking out with the tunes on while quilting, I just burst into tears -- but they are tears of joy. I'm doing what I love and having so much fun.

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I had a Vikingmegaquilter and Inspira frame for 4 years. Towards the end I was constantly buying things to upgrade it (base, hexifoot). I planned to get a full size longarm when I retired in 2014.

I was living in an apt in TX waiting for my house to sell in TN. It took a year. I was happy in an apt, but I started thinking about buying a house in TX. Why? Because I wanted a longarm. I found a bigger apt and bought a used Millenium in 2009.

I found out I had Breast Cancer in 2010. I had surgery and radiation. I had a different cancer scare in 2011 and had to have an immediate hysterectomy, but no cancer was found. I live alone and siblings flew in from MI and WA to help me. I had to mentally prepare for worst case scenarios. I am 60 and my Mother and Sister died of cancer at ages 53 and 47.

All is good now. I am very happy I followed my dream and got my machine.

I went through some intimidation by the big machine, but I have really enjoyed having it. You have a head start on the learning curve from owning the Grand.

I technically have a business, but very few customers. That is okay. After I speak with my accountant, I am going to close the business. I travel with my job and I sometimes have little home time during the work week. Also, I think I started the business to justify this big purchase and now I am okay with doing it for me.

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