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I too had a little second thought creep in, not so much about the purchase, but overall how big a thing I was getting into. ( I suppose $$ figured in that). But now I don't regret it for one bit. You will see from the people that post replies to this thread, some have had a period of concern about the actual purchase, but it passes. You will look back in even a short period of time and be glad you decided you did. And in the between time, the forum will give you lots of support and encouragement from quilters that have once been where you are today. Enjoy the journey, and have fun quilting!!:)

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Someone once told me that they consider the money spent on "quilting things" as money spent on therapy. They could either give it to a therapist (once a week) or spend it on something that helps them relax and feel good and is something they can use 365 days of the year for many years if they choose. I like her attitude!!

Try it...see how it goes and how you feel about it in a year or so. You can always resell it. I am betting that a year from now you won't part with it. As I am sure you have read on this forum, many of us have named our machines and we really become quite attached to them.

Good luck with the machine and have fun! Welcome to our wonderful world of longarm quilting.

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This question comes up all the time! :) Yes it is a big purchase, but why not?:o

I bought mine because I wanted to work from home. Well .................. I reached the stage where I was going to have to seriously work and take on all and every quilt that came my way and push myself to make this a paying business. I decided that it was not worth to do this purely for the money, so I kept it to the point where I still love quilting. I am not going to mess up a love of my life chasing the dollar. So, in the moment, the machine does not pay its way, but do I care? No way!!!:cool:

For years, I made a home for my family where the Army sent us, sacrificing my own career and dreams so Geoff could follow his. The day comes where your life has to pay something back to you as well - enjoy the machine and see it as a present to yourself. It is non fattening, relieves stress and is much cheaper and better for you than chemical sedatives/calmatives. You broaden your family by being included in your online APQS family. It becomes a refuge when times are bad, it allows you to feel uplifted when you achieve a simple feather or even a circle and ------- it hardly ever talks back!;)

Cheers,

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THis is completely normal! Think of it as buying a new car you drive in a different way :P. Then you'll think it is pretty cheap! Have you seen car prices lately? In all seriousness it is a big purchase but think of all the joy you'll be able to give others with your creations. You'll love your machine! I bought mine 4 1/2 years ago and I have never regretted it.

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I bought my long arm to quilt for pleasure for myself to begin with. I never intended to make a business out of it, but that's how it has evolved and I'm happy about that as I can stay home and "work". My husband used to buy motorcycles to pleasure ride, and his motorcycles cost more than my machine and that's how I justified spending the money back then. I've kept my machine and he sold his motorcycles. Guess he hadn't found one that he "bonded" with like I have my machine. Or maybe that's just a guy thing (sorry guys). :D If you can afford it, try it. If you regret buying it in a year or so, it appears the resale value of these machines seems to hold very well. Good luck with your decision.

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It is a frightening thing to do, spend that much money on oneself. If it is going to cause you much financial problems then perhaps you should rethink it. But...... if it is because you feel you don't deserve it STOP....you do, we only go around once. It will bring you much joy. Besides you will could do quilts for others and make a little money on too.

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I bought mine because from the moment I tried one at a show I KNEW it was what I wanted to do. I justified that by taking in customer quilts and it paid for itself within 2 years. However, I do find it very hard to find time to do my own quilts now as I stay booked up with customer quilts, some are a pleasure to do and others, well, lets call them learning experiences. I have to put mine in line and when it is my turn I finally get to work on mine. But I have learned so much and really enjoyed quilting my own quilt and that wait was worth it....I guess the answer to your question is NO, I have not regretted it one day and I still love it after 4 years!

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If it will make your heart sing AND you can responsibly afford it then what is there to regret? If you are feeling selfish about quilting only for yourself there are always charity quilts and gifts you can quit for others. They are great machines, I love mine and quilting makes my heart sing, guilt is for liars and thieves.

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Listen to what they have said above. You are worth every penny. We as women always seem to put ourselves last to take care and do for others. This is one thing you can do for yourself and share with as many as you like. Without my Millie i could not make all the Hospice, neonatal and QOV quilts I make. GO FOR IT! AND NEVER LOOK BACK!

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It is so normal for any woman to feel bad about indulging herself with something that brings her pure joy! And isn't that typical of our gender. We spend our entire lives, giving and nurturning life all around us. So here's a thought, if you pour all you are out to others, doesn't it stand to reason that the well runs dry at some point in life? Nurture your creative spirit, God gave you this talent and desire to create to bring you closer to him. Do it! Find joy in your life, you will never be sorry!

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I bought mine after years of dreaming of owning one. I never intend to quilt for others professionally and I think this may be a growing demographic of longarm owners. It's ok. Take a deep breath and don't be intimidated by the machine when it arrives. Basically, you are drawing with needle and thread and moving the pencil instead of the paper. I just like to idea of being able to finish my projects by myself and saying, "there, i did that." It is a large chunk of change but aren't you worth it? Have you seen the prices of some just DSMs lately? WOW! But I'd rather use a longarm to quilt than any DSM. IMHO Come on ahead and join the fun...jump in, the waters fine!

Sally

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Guest Linda S

Devil's advocate and business woman here. If you really think you can learn to quilt on a big machine and will enjoy it, go for it. If you're really worried about the money, it would indeed be more cost effective to find yourself a talented quilter, continue piecing your tops, and have him/her complete them for you. If you've not see good work in your area and would just rather do it yourself, then go for it.

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We all seem to hit this wall....sooner or later. For some it's more major than others some can work through it and others can't. We all have our share of toys us girls as well as our hubby's. At my house Hubby gets a toy I get one too. But I've been known to save up his toy purchases to buy a huge toy for my.

I guess what I'm trying to say is as long as you aren't messing with Mortage money or your way of life then you to deserve it. Life is short, we as girls don't tend to buy just because stuff. We have to justify it and ponder over it and then 90% of the time talk ourselves out of it. My machines are not only my toys, they are my relaxation, theropy, and when I'm pissed off my way of working through the mad. It beats drinking and cigarettes and better for my health.

You are the only one who can answer honestly why you are feeling this way, but try it you will enjoy it. And like after childbirth, two week later you'll be asking yourself why you doubted the purchase.

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I don't regret buying mine one bit. I think if I had to do it over again, I would do the same. I love my Millie and now I am buying the IQ (another big purchase). But I see it as, it's something for me and I never buy anything for ME. I love to quilt and it's a therapy. I keep telling my DH that I could be out in the bars drinking and spending money, but instead, I am home sewing and quilting. Isn't that better? And I am a happy camper doing that.

My DH is very supportive because he sees me happy and he sees what kind of stuff I am producing.

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I felt that way too! Then I thought about my sweet sweet hubby who belongs to a hunting club, owns a 4-wheeler and a Harley, goes to every football, basketball, and baseball game Southern Miss has. Then I though, I am worth it too! I love my hubby big time and don't say a word about his activities because he loves them so. So, I figure I should enjoy my time also! Blessings to you.

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JC,

If you are having buyers remorse at this time---Then don't do it. It's as plain and simple as that. Follow your gut feelings at this time. I think once you do that a great sense of relief and calm will come over you. If this purchase will cause any kind of financial strain or other problems, only you know for sure. You can ask, and you will get all sorts of reasons why you should or should not pursue this purchase. If you have to ask----Then maybe it's not the right time in your life to make the commitment. . I would never try to persuade anyone to buy something if they are as unsure as you seem at this time.

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My machine is for my own sewing. I like to be the one who completes them from start to finish. Yes, it is expensive, but for me it is worth every penny. You need to decide what is best for you. One option would be to buy a used APQS machine, the cost isn't as much and APQS will support you with any help you need. Except the warranties on the machines do not transfer.

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I'm not pushing you to buy something you can't afford, but ... Like I said before, you deserve to be happy if this is something you want.

Way back in 2003 I decided I wanted one (for me only - not to start a business) So, I saved my money away for 3 years before I bought my machine in mid 2007. If finances are an issue, just save your money and buy it later on.

It's been over 4 years now and not a regret... and I love LOVE my machine. I love it. I lovvvvve it! :)

Did I mention I love my machine? :cool:

BTW, contrary to my original plans I ended up starting a machine quilting business (pursuaded by my husband) and it has been a part time (fun) side business for me. I have enjoyed operating this business. I have met the most fascinating people, I've quilted some amazing quilt tops, and I've made some money too. It's all good.

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In the big scheme of the world they always say that wishing you had in your life is much more bothersome than, why did I!! Especially when you get to compare notes, friendship, ideas,problems and just general good support when you need it most from the best group of people in the world who will never repeat anything to anyone you don't hold in confidence beyond this site!

You made a great choice! look in the mirror when you get it going and do your first practice sheet--see the big smile!!

grasshopper

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Examine your reasons for wanting a machine. In your quilting, what part of the process do you love? If you love piecing the most, maybe a longarm isn't for you. You can pay somebody to do a lot of quilts for the price of one of these machines.

However, if you like the quilting process, and like me..feel the quilt isn't "yours" unless you do it from start to finish..then a longarm is something you might just love. For me, the quilt is all about the quilting. The piecing is just something I have to do in order to have something to quilt on. I quilt a little for others, but that's mainly to have quilts to "practice" on, and to keep up and improve my skills. The extra money pays for tools and gadgets.

Examine your committment to learning to use it. If you don't want to practice, if you feel you are just going to be able to whip out a quilt after a week of playing with the machine, you will be disappointed.

Longarming takes time, patience, and practice. If you are not willing to do that, or are easily discouraged, you are going to have an expensive quilt rack in your studio.

Yes, the machines are expensive. I drive a 2003 car, our other car is a 2000. We don't trade cars until one dies. Other women get a new one every couple years. I don't feel guilty about my machine. I'll save money somewhere else.

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