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Hi, I don't post much, but have a quick question. I told a gal that I would do a graduation quilt for her back in April. She told me she would have it to me by mid-May. She called last night and wanted to know if she could drop it off tonight and would like it by THURSDAY this week so that she could bind it and give it as a gift on Saturday.

Dilemma...so last night I busted to finish a quilt after working all day. Got it done..... The quilt that is being dropped off is a signature quilt and approx. 60 x 72, not overly large. At this point, she is willing to do an overall pattern. I know that I can get it done, however have to rearrange my evening plans the next couple of days.

If I charge .03, the cost of the quilting is approximately $130.00. What would you charge for a rush fee? My co-workers (not quilters) say it should be half.

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50 probably...but then you are already charging twice per square inch more than I would do for an overall.


Kristina at website http://withakquilting.blogspot.com/ and personal blog http://froggybottomquilting.blogspot.com/

 

Hoppily quilting along with FROGGER - my Green Millennium, and TOAD - my Liberty. Quiltazoid equipped too!

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Really??? Oh, oh.... I have had a problem figuring out the pricing from the beginning. I have never liked trying to figure out what to charge.

Here is my theory:

I never meander quilts because I think the pantos/overalls are so much prettier. I started out doing quilts for a lot less and sometimes, I averaged between $3.00 and $5.00 per hour depending on how much work/time went into the quilts. My first year of quilting was in 2008, I did over 100 quilts and made around $3200.00 for the year!!!! I was stressed out, sad and I was quilting every night after work for 4 hours and at least one day every weekend. I hated every minute of it. Of course, my customers were very happy to get their quilts done quickly and inexpensively. Then, after a couple of years of torturing myself, I decided that my time was more valuable than that and if I was not going to make money, my time would be better spent doing my own projects. It thinned out the people that don't want to pay much and want their quilts done basically nothing and my good clients have no problem w/the cost. FYI, I am always willing to make a deal, I am bleeding heart by nature. However, I'm willing to sacrifice business to keep my sanity. Is that wrong???

Lisa

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Lisa...charge what you want to earn and what you think your time is worth and what people in your area will pay. No apologies. I doubt seriously if my plumber has such self-doubts when he hands me his bill for $60 an hour or the mechanic at $100 an hour. If you called any of these people for a "rush job" you can bet there would be a hefty "emergency" or "after hours" fee tacked on.

I used to get flack from people when I was working as an RN because we were so "highly paid". Yadda, yadda, yadda. That was ten years ago and I was making a whole $20 per hour. I was saving their lives for Christ's sake (and a few other things)...what is that worth!!!!

You are definitely worth it or else you wouldn't have any customers. You also want it to cost enough that this person doesn't get the idea that she can do this to you with all of her quilts.


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Serendipity: The discovery of something wonderful quite by accident while looking for something quite different.

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If your customers are paying what you are charging without complaint, then continue what you are doing.

I charge .0175 for freehand or pantos

.0250 for very light custom

.0350 for medium custom and

.0450 or heirloom or very heavy custom

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I stopped working for less than I could make at McD a few years ago. I charge .02 for meandering and simple pantos. Custom is much higher as my time is very important to me. Rush jobs are always extra depending on the reason for the rush. Special circumstances (sick child) are handled as such.


Quilting Joyfully,

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Joyce Coburn

APQS Sales,Service, Training

EdgeRider Wheels Dealer

joyce@coburnsquilting.com

www.coburnsquilting.com

330-310-7346

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Lisa, I did not mean to cause grief. By all means, if you can get more in your area...then you are doing good. I would charge 50 rush fee on top of your normal fee. Keep enjoying quilting!


Kristina at website http://withakquilting.blogspot.com/ and personal blog http://froggybottomquilting.blogspot.com/

 

Hoppily quilting along with FROGGER - my Green Millennium, and TOAD - my Liberty. Quiltazoid equipped too!

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I'm bad, so my rush-job fee is all about the customer's attitude and the validity of their excuse/need. If it's a comfort quilt for someone with dire health issues--no extra charge and sometimes no quilting charge! If your customer was mine I would charge $50. Repeat the longarmer's mantra--"Lack of planning on your part does not make it an emergency on my part.";):P

Gently but firmly let her know you are a professional and your time is valuable. Let her know the extra is for overtime--which means time away from your family or your own projects.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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Thank you. I will definitely give her a call this afternoon BEFORE she make the trip to my house. I agree that $50.00 seems reasonable. FYI, I did not make her aware of a rush fee yet, as I have been torn since my conversation with her as what to say...... I do a quilt for this person, about once a year.

Lisa

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I charge a percentage of the quilting charge (usually about 20%) on top of the regular quilting charge for a rush job, but this woman sounds oblivious to the problem her unkept promises has caused, so I'd likely up it to 50%. You don't want her to try this again!

Barbara

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Guest Linda S

I agree with Linda on this. $50 sounds reasonable. And only do it if you really want to. Don't be afraid to say NO!

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I think alot of customers think of us as 'friends' or 'fellow quilters' and don't take our work seriously as being a true and real JOB... they have the mind set that this is a hobby or fun or a nice pass time...which of course is true...BUT, it is also our JOB and we WORK at it to get as good as we can, therefore we CHARGE money for our efforts...

Don't ever feel bad for charging for your work and time regardless.....


Laura

my.doterra.com/naturespoweroils

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I was thinking about all these rush stories overnight and I thought I should come clean. I rarely charge a rush fee. I don't tend to do rush jobs unless the customer can convince me they are more important than everyone else in my queue. If they are really that important they don't need the rush fee. Most have been recipient or customer about to die, that trumps most things for me. A couple have been really tight but we always make it, they have their quilt for a few hours or days and that's worthwhile. The I didn't plan ahead people should not put out those who did so I don't want to fit them in. The ones who may get hit with a rush fee are those who just haven't got a clue what they are asking for because they don't quilt and are trying to get something commissioned for a special event.

Ferret

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I'm like Ferret in that I don't usually do a rush job unless the circumstance is important to me. Most of my customers know this and do tend to plan ahead.

If they do call for a rush job (i.e. a graduation), I tell them that they can call each of the 20 or so customers ahead of them and explain why their quilt is more important. Or I give them the names of a few other quilters. (They won't do it either! :P)


Caroline

2009 Green Millennium with Quilt Path

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since the decision is mine to make I don't charge a rush fee. But then I don't work my weekend for anyone either, unless I've put myself behind by playing a bit too much. Figure I can say 'no' if I need to, especially if a date is not met by the client. Good Luck. Hope you still enjoy quilting the quilt for her.


Kathy A

Liberty & Millenium

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