RonieM

Quilt Path vs. IntelliQuilter

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Is there anyone who is familiar with both Quilt Path and IntelliQuilter? If you were going to purchase one over the other, which one would you choose and why?

Unfortunately, the information I have been able to find out about Quilt Path isn't very detailed. I sure hope more information is forthcoming.

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I have both the IQ and Quilt Path and also CQ. Each is different with different strengths and weaknesses. You need to find the system that will work best for you in both $$ and what you are expecting it to do. There is still a great deal of work being done on Quilt Path as it gets perfected and more features are being added. Be patient...good things are coming!


Lucy Drinkall

o2b Quilting, LLC
APQS sales/rental and custom quilting

1025 Industrial Drive, Suite A
Spring Valley, MN 55975
www.o2bquilting.com
lucy@acegroup.cc

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Guest Linda S

If you're considering buying computerized, I think I'd wait till APQS gets its act totally together before buying a Quilt Path. It has the potential to be a nice unit, but with so little information, I'd be more than hesitant to get one -- especially when you can get a BasIQ with all the features for less than the $9400. Another drawback (for me, although some will see it as a plus) is that Quilt Path is Windows based. After a 32-year career at a university where I was responsible for maintaining and upgrading all our computers, I can tell you that they were all Macs by the time I left. Windows crashes far too often, but it is compatible with a lot of different software. Lots of things to consider here, but I'd wait till you can make a more informed choice.

Edit: In all fairness - I have an IQ. It is the most fabulous quilting tool I've ever come across, and the customer service has been exemplary. I got a tablet that had a bad connection in it and, even though the owner of the company was out of the country, the problem was taken care of promptly. In two days, I had a brand new computer tablet, and the whole thing was running great. The things this system can do will blow your mind.

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The stitch out speeds are something that you can set. I do not stitch at MAX speed on my Quilt Path, IQ or CQ. I set the speed at about where I would do a panto that I am very familiar with. I find that when I have any of them stitch very fast I have more thread breakage/tension issues. (might just be me) Quilt Path uses/works with the APQS stitch regulator and the other two systems do not. This means that when the system pauses such as in a corner or point the Quilt Path needle stops moving. In the other two systems them needle moves at at constant speed at all times so if you have the needle speed set very fast and the machine pauses in a corner/point the bobbin thread may break. Once again, you set the speed for all systems where you are comforable operating them at. I like that I can slow all the systems way down if I am using a specialty thread.


Lucy Drinkall

o2b Quilting, LLC
APQS sales/rental and custom quilting

1025 Industrial Drive, Suite A
Spring Valley, MN 55975
www.o2bquilting.com
lucy@acegroup.cc

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Windows has improved tons since the days of old. I never get crashes on Win 7 computers. Also Win 8 is the latest and greatest. ;)

IQ is Linux based.

Just my 2 cents, besides can you tell I love Windows! :D :D :D

I would wait out for Quilt path, it was designed for APQS.

Cheers,

Parm

(Gammill Gal)


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 I just started blogging:   http://fiddleheadquiltz.blogspot.ca/

 

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Ronie,

I've been racking my brain making a list of pros and cons for each system. For me, ordering Quilt Path was a no-brainer after considering a couple key factors.

Let me first say that I am not an expert at Automated quilting. I do not own an IQ, CQ, Stattler or Pro-stitcher and am not comparing a product that I already know and love to QP. I am first a longarm quilter looking to increase my profitibility and second a dealer looking to provide my clients the best possible choice and most bang for their buck with the least amount of trouble shooting.

First and foremost, the drive system for QP is engineered by Mike Moore and the engineers at APQS. That makes me feel all warm and fuzzy(no pun intended). I do not want to bypass the best stitch regulator on the market. QP uses APQS regulators while IQ runs in manual. That point alone speaks volumes to me.

The QP installation is so simple you will be amazed at how fast it is to set up. I will film a video tomorrow of the process as my QP arrives in the morning. I find all the wheels and wires of IQ a little overwhelming so much so that I will not remove a head from a table to service a machine with IQ attached.

I like that the QP tablet sits horizontally like the section of the quilt I am working on. That makes better sense to me than standing it vertically.

I like that QP is belt driven. I do not like the wheel/motor system of IQ as much. Belt drive makes more sense to me and from the amount I tested it in Houston, I feel it is very precise.

I know several IQ owners that have had their tablets replaced just like Linda mentions above.

(edit) and they all were replaced very fast and they have not had a problem since.

Although I am a Mac Man, I do trust windows to run one single application. The tablet is dedicated to QP. We will see how it holds up.

A couple months ago the biggest argument was that QP does not have a 'no sew' zone. APQS heard this and as of January 15, QP will include that feature. Now the number one argument has changed to 'QP does not have a thread break sensor' Well, I'm sure that too will be addressed. I do not feel that QP will ever be as versatile in the 'manipulate a design' feature set of IQ. IQ is brilliant in that regard. But I am not a pattern designer, I just want to pick one, plot it, quilt it and move on. I don't think I will ever use ALL the features that even QP offers.

What Quilt Path does, it does very well and I am confident it can make me money as it sits now. All the Free updates for life just make the deal that much sweeter.

I hope this helps and I hope that my BIAS for APQS quality and customer service doesn't disqualify me from being completely impartial.


Matt Sparrow
APQS Canada
National Sales Manager

 

Sparrow Studioz
Longarm Quilting Studio & APQS Showroom
We Sell, Rent & Service APQS Longarm Machines

 

 

apqs-canada.png
 
 

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Matt - what's a 'no sew' zone?

You can trace appliqué and tell the computer to fill the background around it and not sew over it. I'm not sure if that means I can do an entire e2e and leave blocks un-quilted. Perhaps someone else can chime in.


Matt Sparrow
APQS Canada
National Sales Manager

 

Sparrow Studioz
Longarm Quilting Studio & APQS Showroom
We Sell, Rent & Service APQS Longarm Machines

 

 

apqs-canada.png
 
 

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Matt,

You are convincing me more and more that I need to put Quilt Path on my non Blissed 2007 Millenium and let it do the hard yards on the Overall Quilting.

Now to plan how to rearrange my sewing room to fit two longarm machines and move the cutting and piecing tables into the family room!


Lyn Crump   Hand Guided 2013 Millenium Blissed and Gliding    APQS Sales Rep SE Qld Australia   www.busyquilting.com.au   On Facebook and Instagram as BusyQuilting


Attitude is everything - So pick a good one!

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I think the most important thing is that you pick the system that is right for you and your budget, what you are going to use it for and the features that you are specifically looking for. I have used CQ, Statler and IQ. I bought IQ's BasiQ in October because it was exactly what I was looking for and fit my budget. I love all the features and the fact that I can upgrade it. I did not want a belt driven system, I liked the IQ set up better and will be upgrading to the next level after the holidays.

They all have their pros and cons. I also picked IQ because of the excellent support. And yes, there was a tablet issue with some. But ALL these systems have had their issues in the past, upgrades that didn't fair well, etc. I love IQ, and the support I receive in training on my new system.

I have not used the new system from APQS so I can't comment on that.

Try them all out, talk to everyone you can and make the decision that is right for you.

Happy Holidays!


Beth Liotta

APQS Liberty with Intelliquilter BasiQ

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Guest Linda S

Yes, a no-sew zone is a way to mark a section of your quilt so that your computer quilter will not sew there. You can define the space by tracing around an appliqué or other shape, or you can insert a geometric shape like a circle or rectangle and the computer will sew around it. This is kind of cool to do in say an upper area of a panto, where you can leave a circle unquilted and go back later and maybe just put in a flower or other significant motif from the panto, or you could put someone's initials in. It's very cool. The IQ also has new tools called distort, shape shift, and magnet, so if your piecer's blocks aren't (ahem) exactly square, you can stretch and fit the motif to fit exactly into the block.

Just to address the stitch regulator thing - IQ has a 'dwell' setting for strong curves or points. When you are stitching something with sharp points or tight curves you can adjust the dwell from 1-3 and the machine will slow a bit to make those points come out nicely. As far as speed? I had no idea my Liberty could run that fast!! I'm amazed at how quickly I get quilts done. A computer is definitely the way to go. Oh - and as far as precision -- IQ has a set-up test that is run the first time the machine is set up, and you can run it again later if you think things might be off. With a practice piece on, you put your needle down in some fabric. Then you let the machine run the test pattern, up, down, back, forth, around in circles, loops, etc., up and down the table. About nine minutes later it comes back down and the needle will drop into that very same hole you made in the first place. It is accurate to a frog's hair. It's as accurate today as it was the day it was installed.

Whichever system you decide on, you'll be amazed. I know IQ is right for me.

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Although I am in love with most things APQS. I have to recommend Intelliquilter if you are going to do serious design editing to compliment your quilts. It has so many amazing features for customizing a design. And after taking both Suzanne Moreno's 45 hour IQ and digitizing classes, I can truly appreciate the design customization available in IQ. IMHO no other system out there is in their league (yet). Updates are free and they are always improving things. I would, however, recommend getting some good training under your belt like Suzanne's so that you are able to make full use of all its features and get your money's worth. If you will be happy using the designs as they are then you might decide to choose a less expensive system.


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www.silverneedlestitching.com

APQS Millenium with Bliss & Intelliquilter

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Okay.. so can someone tell me the diff between a 'belt drive' and the system IQ has?

I have 2 systems: IQ on my Millie (motor driven) & AutoPilot on my Innova (belt driven).

Motor driven - small motors are attached to your system - one motor runs along your main rail and controls the left/right motion of your machine & the other motor is attached to the cross base directly under the head and this motor controls the front to back movement. The motors have little wheels that when engaged will snug up to the rails and the computer tells the motors how much to move in one direction or the other.

Cable/belt driven: Cables are attached to your set up and run the length of your table. For my system the belts run along the top of the table. One belt controls the left to right movement and the other belt controls the front to back movement. Claps have been attached to my head and need to be attached to the belts when I use the computer. The computer tells the belts how much to move and in what direction.

My AutoPilot system stitches more slowly than my IQ but I find it more accurate. I can speed either system up but have found that on either system, the faster you go, the less accurate the stitch out and the more thread issues. The speed you select should be determined by the complexity and size of the design you are stitching. AutoPilot is programmed to slow down for small intense stitching and IQ I have to actually determine how slow I need to set the speed for the best stitch-out. I have also found that setting the stitches per inch much easier on my Innova - I set it on my head the same as if I had no computer. With IQ, I have had to figure the balance between what SPI I set on the head and then learn what settings (there are 2 to set - speed and details) are needed on the IQ to get the right SPI - I finally had to make a chart. I don't know how the APQS system works - hopefully the same as my AP system - plug in the SPI on the head and off you go.

Hopefully this helped.

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Although I am in love with most things APQS. I have to recommend Intelliquilter if you are going to do serious design editing to compliment your quilts. It has so many amazing features for customizing a design. And after taking both Suzanne Moreno's 45 hour IQ and digitizing classes, I can truly appreciate the design customization available in IQ. IMHO no other system out there is in their league (yet). Updates are free and they are always improving things. I would, however, recommend getting some good training under your belt like Suzanne's so that you are able to make full use of all its features and get your money's worth. If you will be happy using the designs as they are then you might decide to choose a less expensive system.

Cheryl is right - IQ is in a league of its own when it comes to designing and quilting in one unit as well as already having a few bells and whistles that help make quilting a bit easier. The companies on the market now have had to make a choice - are they leaning toward the design side (IQ) or are they primarily for quilting (most all other companies). I love the ability I have with IQ to fit designs into wonky blocks right at the machine which is not as easy with AP - probably the biggest draw for IQ. On the other hand, all the companies are adding features that add to the ease of using our computer systems and there are a couple of excellent stand alone programs on the market specifically for designing - Art and Stitch being the strongest in this area. ProQ is another program on the market but not as strong as AnS. All the companies continually upgrade their programs - nature of the market.

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Guest Linda S

Meg - I'm surprised you have that much difficulty with your IQ stitching things out correctly. Are there particular patterns that give you difficulty? I generally just keep my dwell on 1, and then only have to make minor adjustments in machine speed and IQ speed (usually depending on if I'm in a terrible rush to get something done or not). I've had no thread issues, no point and curve issues, etc. I generally use Glide and magna-glide bobbins, and everything comes out great. I have no charts or tables for the various settings -- they're all within a few points of each other and, as I say, just depend on how fast I want to go.

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Meg - I'm surprised you have that much difficulty with your IQ stitching things out correctly. Are there particular patterns that give you difficulty? I generally just keep my dwell on 1, and then only have to make minor adjustments in machine speed and IQ speed (usually depending on if I'm in a terrible rush to get something done or not). I've had no thread issues, no point and curve issues, etc. I generally use Glide and magna-glide bobbins, and everything comes out great. I have no charts or tables for the various settings -- they're all within a few points of each other and, as I say, just depend on how fast I want to go.

Linda - I did not indicate that I was having difficultly with IQ. I don't. What I indicated is that I have found the cable/belt system to be more accurate. I have had to tweak my motors more than once and that is a huge pain. Also, having had my IQ on two different set-ups, I have become pretty good at tweaking my IQ. Helen B, my IQ rep was fabulous working my though how to tweak my system. I tweak until my test stitch outs are perfect and then the motors hold for only a certain amount of time. I think with constant stitching, the screws on the motors are affected and then of course the motors become slightly off and it is back to tweaking. The belts on my AP are totally consistent though I understand they may have to be tightened very occasionally and the process for that is totally easy-peasy - takes about 2 minutes (or less). Also the issue of accuracy is affected due to the fact that I most often use battings with higher loft - the higher the loft, the greater occurrence of draw-in. My Innove/AP handles (not cures) this issue better than my Millie/IQ. It is one of the reasons I have started doing most of my E2E's from the center out. If one is aware of their personal quilting style and takes the time to get to know their systems (the good and the bad), then all falls into place. I do sometimes decide to put one project on one system or the other strictly due to the type of quilting/issues that go along with that particular project. If I only had one system, I would just deal with it and love it because computerized quilting gives me so many more choices.

As to SPI - there is no set stich per in with IQ & Millie combination. You set your SPI on Millie & then have to determine the speed and details on IQ to attain that SPI. Say I set 12 SPI on my Millie - I will not get 12 SPI unless both details and speed are in sync. If I vary either speed or details from what I know will provide 12 SPI, then all bets are off. Since I do vary my SPI often (anywhere from about 9 to about 16/18), this can become a pain. If you don't vary your stitch length often or by much, you will not deal with this issue. You will have your basic settings on your machine and will go from project to project with out much adjustment. On my AP/Innova, I can set my SPI at 12 on my Innova and no matter what speed I set on my AP - I will always get 12 SPI & since AP is programmed to slow down going into points and curves, there is no "details" or "dwell" to set. I deal with this issue on my IQ and have learned my IQ adjustments but it did take a bit to get all my ducks in a row. With AP - no adjustments to learn - just set my SPI and that's what I get.

Finally, I am very particular about my quilting - some indicate that I am a bit anal - LOL. I don't do as much quilting as many of you and am sure I take more time than many other quilters but I want everything to be the very best I can do which includes great stitch outs with very consistent SPI. I am not an artist and I envy those who can easily decide what to quilt where and come up with these gorgeous quilts - I am a technician by nature and know my limitations but still love the quilting process. Any computerized system would take me to a higher level of quilting just because it allows me to quilt designs I could not easily do.

Anyone considering a computerized system really needs to look at all products available to their systems and then decide what is important to them - cost, ease of use, design capabilities on the fly, etc. I personally am thrilled for APQS and their new system - gives quilters another option and knowing APQS - it will be a good option. When I critique something, I try to be honest with benefits and shortfalls that I have faced - not whether one system is better than the other. What might be perfect for me might be the wrong choice for someone else. I hope anyone looking into a computerized system takes the time to research what is out there and what is important to them. Make a list and check it twice. It will change your style of quilting - won't speed it up but will open up a whole new world to enjoy. Get on the various forums for the different systems - read, ask questions, and note any problems that might arise with the system. No system is perfect just as no LA is perfect. As for APQS's new system - not much out there yet but both Matt and Barb Mayfield (maybe others??) have the system and am sure have lots to share.

Sorry this was a wordy response - just really want others to know that I am not saying one is better than another - just that different systems offer different things. It is for the purchaser to determine what is best for them. With APQS added to the mix - I wish them good luck!!!!

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What a great review Meg, especially about the belt-driven versus the motor systems. I don't have an APQS, but a Gammill. When I decided to computerize I had no clue about the belt-driven vs motorized systems. I was sitting on the fence about Statler, a belt-driven system vs the IQ a motorized system. Everytime I asked about different systems, on differnet groups, I always recevied responses indicating why one product was superior than the other, software wise, but nothing about the physical workings of the setup. I couldn't get a lot of information on the Statler because of the closed group on yahoo, but I went with my gut instinct. I chose the Statler for my system because it was designed for my machine. And, I'm so glad I did. :D As well, now, because of the belt-driven system for it's accuracy.

The APQS Quilt Path looks like an awesome product. I'm sure Quilt Path will add more features as necessary with future software upgrades, and be at par with current computerized systems, if not already. :D :D


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 I just started blogging:   http://fiddleheadquiltz.blogspot.ca/

 

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Interesting topic. I need to learn a whole new language to understand the differences between systems. It is hard to compare when I don't have a clue about the terms being used mean!

Sue, I felt the exact same way.

I remember how long it took me to choose what brand of longarm to buy. I made the wrong decision the first time around and really researched the second time and ended up with an APQS.

When we started looking for a computer for our longarm, we compare it to how we decided what kind of cell phone to buy. We love APPLE. We have over a dozen APPLE products in our house. When we went looking for new cell phones we found a couple brands that had WAY more features than iPhones with thousands of happy customer reviews yet we ended up with iPhones because they do everything we need them to do, and they do it really well. I feel the same way about APQS & Quilt Path. QP does everything I need it to do at this moment. I'm sure I'll never use all the features it already has. It was a very natural decision that I have not questioned since. Although the comments here have me second guessing a little.

Ronie, to be honest...

I would have to become proficient on all the computers on the market to make a valid argument for any one of them. I just didn't have that kind of time. For the longest time I was leaning towards IQ so I was excited to see your question and happy to offer my observations about the differences between them. I was thrilled to hear APQS was launching into automated quilting. Like everything else they do better than anyone, I'm sure QP too will be top notch. I have complete trust that QP's features will grow along with my desire for feature rich software. It is after all just software. All the great features mentioned above by happy IQ owners have me really excited about the future of QP.

I don't think either IQ or QP are the wrong choice. From the sounds of it you would be very happy with an IQ. For me, as an APQS rep the decision was much easier than it is for you. I wish you all the quilty happiness in the world no matter which way you decide to go.

I can't wait to dive into the world of automated quilting, all brands aside. I'm off to download some designs.

by the way, the install took me less than 1/2hr.

sorry for hijacking this post ;)


Matt Sparrow
APQS Canada
National Sales Manager

 

Sparrow Studioz
Longarm Quilting Studio & APQS Showroom
We Sell, Rent & Service APQS Longarm Machines

 

 

apqs-canada.png
 
 

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