RonieM

Quilt Path vs. IntelliQuilter

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You can trace appliqué and tell the computer to fill the background around it and not sew over it. I'm not sure if that means I can do an entire e2e and leave blocks un-quilted. Perhaps someone else can chime in.

The answer is "yes" for IQ but only to a degree & a good degree at that. Have done it with wonderful results but you have to consider the draw-up that occurs while quilting - the nature of putting that first stitch in the layers of your quilt. You can definitely plot your course but babysitting is in order to make sure that your "no-sew" hits its mark - a few less stitches (press the stop button) or few stitches more might be in order (add a couple of free motion stitches) or just a bit of manipulating with your hands. No matter what computerized system you have, you are best to go section by section. It is not the best plan to just set up a row with one or multiple "no-sew" zones, press the start button and walk away - you most likely will not be pleased with the results no matter what system you own. AP is not capable of this yet so have done my plotting using the ProQ program & Art and Stich and this method has worked beautifully - using a secondary program causes a bit more work but it is still very doable and results have been great.

I have found that often times it is easier to do free motion around an applique (am doing one right now). By the time you plot your "no-sew" zone and get every thing in order it might just be easier (and often is if you ask my opinion) to just go for it and enjoy your free motion quilting. Sashings can be the same way. I sometimes do some wonderful computerized blocks & then get to my sashings and find that because I have worked on my free motion skills, I can do just as good (if not perfect) a job and much quicker if I free motion the sashings. (Have I mentioned yet that I love my rulers!!!! almost as much as my computers.) I continue to indicate that as we quilt, the layers of fabric shift and draw in but the computer can not recognize this. When we free-motion quilt, our eyes pick up on this and we naturally adjust. Because the computer is going by a straight/linear graph plotted type design, it can not read what the layers of fabric are doing so it just keeps going as if the fabrics of the quilt never shift or change - therefore we should babysit our computerized systems and the degree of babysitting is dependent on what we are doing. Certain projects take very little babysitting - other projects take lots of babysitting - it is the nature of computerized quilting.

Computerized quilting has its place and I love, love it!!!! but it is not a push a button and go for it. There is a learning curve and you have to learn and love what it can do for your quilting as well as learn its limitations in relation to your own quilting skills and how this fits in with your quilting style. I would never go back to being without but I love the fact that I can and do enjoy my free-motion quilting along with my computer work. For those who are in business you might find the computerized system an absolute love affair - your E2E will whip out and be wonderful but for those who do lots of custom, quilting is gorgeous but still just as time intensive - sometimes more time intensive. There is no win-win - just the joy of quilting no matter how you accomplish the end result - a wonderful quilt that you can be proud of.

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One last post - I have been too wordy and I am sure you can tell I am fairly passionate about each person selecting what is best for them and the joys/demons of computerized quilting. I purchased my IQ before it was the way to go according to many on this forum and have watched the tides turn - not a problem - just think how the early LA-er's were treated when it was said that a quilt was not really a quilt unless it was hand quilted. Times change and methods grow and change. We are so lucky to have more tools to work with than our great-grandmothers!!!! Be true to yourself and your spending abilities. Enjoy your quilting and the glow on your customer's faces when they get their quilts back after they have been turned into wonderful works of love and art no matter what method of quilting. If you have any additional questions or comments for me, please send a personal message so that I don't take up any more space here. Enjoy your quilting and for those shopping - good luck - it is a wonderful world out there with several options to look at. A huge "Good Luck" to APQS.

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Guest Linda S

Hmmm. I totally agree with you all about needing to buy what's best for you. However, I really question Meg's need to do all this tweaking and adjusting. I've been running my IQ for a year and a half, sometimes at top speed, sometimes slower when doing custom blocks. Yes, I change speed of the IQ and yes, I change the speed on my Liberty. It's not rocket science to get the stitch length you want, and I'm positive, that if I were to run the test pattern tomorrow, I'd still have that needle come back down in the hole it made at the start of the pattern. I have never had to tweak my wheels even once. Do you, by any chance, not have super motors, Meg? I just don't get all this need for adjustments and charts.

P.S. Although I'm assuming it was not your intent, your comments about how meticulous you are about your quilting border on the insulting. Do you mean to imply that the rest of us really don't care? I certainly hope not.

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Thank you Meg for your detailed and thoughtful opinions. Owning and operating two systems has given you a bit more of an objective view on the pros and cons of each (imho). It is human nature to defend to the death the superiority of an expensive purchase we've made.


Gail Olfert

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of times our breath is taken away

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Hmmm. I totally agree with you all about needing to buy what's best for you. However, I really question Meg's need to do all this tweaking and adjusting. I've been running my IQ for a year and a half, sometimes at top speed, sometimes slower when doing custom blocks. Yes, I change speed of the IQ and yes, I change the speed on my Liberty. It's not rocket science to get the stitch length you want, and I'm positive, that if I were to run the test pattern tomorrow, I'd still have that needle come back down in the hole it made at the start of the pattern. I have never had to tweak my wheels even once. Do you, by any chance, not have super motors, Meg? I just don't get all this need for adjustments and charts.

P.S. Although I'm assuming it was not your intent, your comments about how meticulous you are about your quilting border on the insulting. Do you mean to imply that the rest of us really don't care? I certainly hope not.

Linda I'm an outsider looking in, I have no plans for a computerized system. Most of my customer quilts are custom and while yes it would be great to have a machine stitch while I'm able to do something else, it isn't what motivates me. I think I like the challenge of doing it myself. I didn't at all feel like Meg was being insulting to anybody else's use of their IQ. She was simply stating how she handles it and how a computerized system fits into her quilting style. I love to see these comparisons where others freely provide feedback but I hate when it turns personal and others feel like it is insulting them because they don't do that or they haven't had that experience. Meg is clearly a perfectionist (takes one to know one) and even posted how others say she is "anal" but that doesn't mean she is putting those down that aren't like her. I know I'm much more critical about quilting designs and workmanship than my friends are but that doesn't mean I'm putting them down, just the way I am and doesn't make me right or wrong, just simply an opinion which anybody can choose to accept or not accept. Clearly you love your IQ and that is wonderful but getting defensive when a new product or product comparisons come out just isn't necessary. The same things happen when people compare Circle Lord and Quiltazoid. Both products work but it doesn't mean that it is personal that I chose Quiltazoid, just my preference and I'm always willing to share how that works for me. It isn't an attack against Circle Lord or all those that own that product, it just wasn't the one I chose.

Meg I really appreciated your detail, it is really the way I think and I think all too often you hear either all good or all bad. Let's face it most people don't take the time to point out what is good and bad, they either say they love everything about something (rare that you would love everything) or they complain endlessly about a product that didn't work the way they thought it would. I've learned over the past 5 years to try to evaluate both good and bad remarks and come up in the middle to see if the product is for me. I can't tell you how many rulers I've purchased based on somebody else saying they couldn't live without them only to get them and think really the best you've ever used? I've been following the computerized thread for a long time and my gut has always told me that while there are features that I would love it isn't really what I would justify owning because more than 50% of the work I do would not likely be done using the system. If I had two machines, will never happen, mabye I would go for it but for me I think I'll stick with what I have. Many of the details you have taken the time to explain have really enlightened me on how the systems work and what one I'd have to go with if I did go for it.

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Like CJ, I can only speak for IQ, I am pleased with mine. Very easy to use even for "Technology Challenged me" as per DH.

Customer service is great also. I did not bother to test drive other Computerized Systems, I visited Ramona Quilter & tried her IQ on Gammill, I was sold. I go by what what the "Users" go by their reviews.

I do a lot of heavy custom quilting for myself, the quilts are for my portfolio, IQ makes it easy to edit/manipulate designs. Take some classes and just PPP like anything new.

You will be amazed.


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Corey Starkey

IQ & Bllissed Millennium

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Heidi,

I thought exactly the same thing before I got my computer (iQ) I did custom quilting for clients and thought I wouldn't have much use for the computer but was I wrong! It's not really much faster but the computer stitches out everything so well and takes away the hard work of physically standing or sitting and moving the machine for hours. (Every system does that)

I used to get so bored having to stitch out the same motif 12 times on a quilt - the computer takes away that boredom and every motif looks good. I like the quilting to still look the same as it did when I did everything manually so I will often record as I stitch the first motif then the computer does all the other repeats. I don't care that it's not perfect like designer digitized patterns because my freehand quilting was never perfect. If the recording has some obvious bobbles, I'll rotate the repeats so the bobbles aren't always in the same position. I can also clean up those bobbles right on iQ. I don't need any other program.

I also use the new editing features of iQ to make my patterns fit the piecing, much as I did when freehanding - stretching out one curl to go right into a corner, for instance.

It's actually much faster for me to set up borders and sashings than pre-computer. I used to do quite a bit of pre-planning and minimal marking to make sure border patterns were evenly spaced and that sometimes took me a while. Setting those repeats up on my iQ is much faster because it involves no math on my part. I much prefer having the computer do my borders now.

There are still some things I do manually because, although the computer can do them, I can freehand them much faster due to my years of quilting. I will nearly always switch to manual for SID and small background fillers. Switching to manual is very easy with iQ - you can do it right in the middle of quilting, then return to exactly where the computer needs to be. That quick change is invaluable to me.

No matter which computer system one has, it can sew when the phone rings, when a child needs attention, when you are simply not feeling well. The system each one of us chooses is very personal - just like when buying a machine. What I like may not suit someone else. There are so many systems to look at these days - it's a hard choice. I'd still have iQ because I didn't have to change my old machine and iQ just doesn't seem like a computer. If I want to get rid of the computer (no!) I can remove the whole thing and my machine will be exactly the way it was before.

Helen


Helen Baczynski
powerquilting.com
I/S and iQ support

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Guest Linda S
Linda I'm an outsider looking in, I have no plans for a computerized system. Most of my customer quilts are custom and while yes it would be great to have a machine stitch while I'm able to do something else, it isn't what motivates me. I think I like the challenge of doing it myself. I didn't at all feel like Meg was being insulting to anybody else's use of their IQ. She was simply stating how she handles it and how a computerized system fits into her quilting style. I love to see these comparisons where others freely provide feedback but I hate when it turns personal and others feel like it is insulting them because they don't do that or they haven't had that experience. Meg is clearly a perfectionist (takes one to know one) and even posted how others say she is "anal" but that doesn't mean she is putting those down that aren't like her. I know I'm much more critical about quilting designs and workmanship than my friends are but that doesn't mean I'm putting them down, just the way I am and doesn't make me right or wrong, just simply an opinion which anybody can choose to accept or not accept. Clearly you love your IQ and that is wonderful but getting defensive when a new product or product comparisons come out just isn't necessary. The same things happen when people compare Circle Lord and Quiltazoid. Both products work but it doesn't mean that it is personal that I chose Quiltazoid, just my preference and I'm always willing to share how that works for me. It isn't an attack against Circle Lord or all those that own that product, it just wasn't the one I chose.

Heidi - as I tried to make clear, yes, I love my IQ and think it's best but I do think others should buy what suits them. I consider myself a perfectionist also, as do my friends. I felt Meg's post made IQ seem like it needed way too much futzing and adjusting to make it worthwhile. I wanted to comment that it is not my experience in using my IQ for the last 1.5 years. I do a lot of custom work. I do a lot of detailed work. I care about precision. I was offended by Meg's insinuation that while she is a perfectionist, I probably didn't care enough about precision to worry about adjusting my stitches or wheels. I did add the caveat that I had hoped she wasn't trying to be offensive, but that's the way I read it. I also read it as an over-blown description of all the hassle one would have with an IQ. As I said, in my experience, that just isn't so.

I have heard great things about the Innova and their AutoPilot. Actually, I tried and Innova (and taught on one) at MQX. It's a lovely machine. I actually thought about buying one. However, I am still convinced that APQS machines have the best stitch. If I've given the impression that I'm beating down the Quilt Path, I apologize. My point here is that I wouldn't buy anything about which so little information is provided. I waited about 3 years, reading the Intelliquilter list, watching it at shows, etc., before plunking down $12,500 to buy it. I needed to know its workings inside and out before I'd spend that kind of money. Buying something for over $9000 with no details, even though it is "APQS quality" is shaky ground to me. I'm sorry if you all thought I was just dissing it for fun.

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Helen thanks for the added info. I do see the benefits, just don't feel like it is one that I'd ever justify. I am very computer savvy and have no problems using them and in fact live by them most days but I also know that it still takes effort to program and tell it what you want it to do. I have an embroidery machine and I have to say I don't enjoy using it at all. I'm not sure what it doesn't do for me but it doesn't do it LOL.

Linda - I don't personally think rehashing this is productive but it is clear that you have taken my comments personally. I will say that I did not intend them to be personal and I'm sure Meg didn't either. I didn't see that she was "insinuating" anything at all, just giving her feedback. I guess the reader can take things any way they want to. I don't want to see Meg not post because I think she has given the most detailed explanation of the different systems and she has first hand experience with both of the different types of systems. What I got out of her responses was that she never said one was better over other, only that there were pros and cons to both. To discount her feedback on IQ to be a slam against your experience with IQ is wrong. I don't think there are any that are experts with Quilt Path yet and time will tell if that product will stand the test of time. I have no doubt that APQS will stand behind their product because I know how important customer service is to them. Yes it has been a long time in coming but working in a research institute I know how long research takes and how much tweaking can be involved. I also know that rolling out a product with too many bugs can cause it to fail even if it is a good product. I respect APQS for taking their time to market a product only after they've given plenty of time to work out the bugs. Lets face it over time there will be more and more products available and they will always be changing, it is just the nature of the beast.

Meg - thanks for all the info and taking the time to give all the details you've learned and what works for you. You've given me alot of useful information. While I might not be convinced at the moment that I want a computerized system I do enjoy learning as much as I can about them. Please don't stop sharing, I miss your posts! Your work has always been fabulous and I'm selfish and want you to share it.

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I went on the IQ Yahoo group for over two years before I plunked down the $$$, and was so impressed with the way questions were answered, how knowledge was shared and mostly how happy people were with their choice. I had a Gammill first, no SR, just the basics and then switched to an A-1 with stitch regulator.

Besides the ease of use, look at how easy it is to switch from computer driven to manual. With the IQ it is a switch on the machine head, turn a dial and switch the power off and back on again. Boom I'm freehanding that easily.

Do your homework and make an informed decision. Because we live in BC my husband and I installed our IQ ourselves and got it up and running fairly quickly. He knew the mechanical side of things and I knew what it should be doing. (or what I wanted it to be doing) LOL

The price should be the same a year from now after a few brave souls test drive the first ones. Watch and see what the new system will do. I'm very happy with my IQ.

Happy stitching everyone.

Marion in BC

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I think the new super motors on IQ make a difference. I was lucky enough that they were so far behind in production (5 mo) that by the time it came it already had the super motors installed. The one place I feel IQ is falling down is in providing training for new users. But after having it for a year and then taking Susan Moreno's class, perhaps I learned enough about what I didn't know so I appreciated the teaching more. (Did what I just wrote mark sense? I hope so)


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www.silverneedlestitching.com

APQS Millenium with Bliss & Intelliquilter

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If your support person doesn't contact you, don't hesitate to contact them with any questions you might have. They are there to give support for the whole first year of ownership. Only you know what you need help with so please ask your support person when you need help with things you haven't tried before or just don't feel confident about doing. Never feel you are bugging them - it's part of their job to help you for that first year.


Helen Baczynski
powerquilting.com
I/S and iQ support

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In my opinion, the absolutely best thing about ANY computerized system is that they remove 90% of the math from quilting. I'm a mathematical IDIOT, and that's 99% of why I wanted a computerized setup. Anyone can learn freemotion, and mine is decent, but math mastery is probably going to evade me forever. :)


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Guest Linda S

Cheryl - I got lots of help from Helen for the first year. Well, she's still very helpful now, but she was particularly helpful for the first year. The yahoo group is also great for asking questions - Helen helps tremendously there, as do Crystal and Cristyn and all the other users. The video library is great too. And CJ - I couldn't agree with you more! I love it when IQ (and I suppose other computerized systems do this too) puts a pattern in the block at what it thinks is the appropriate size. All I have to do is just play with the tools to make it just right.

Computers rock folks. Especially if you can switch back and forth really easily. You still have to load the quilt, know now to manipulate the quilt, and do all the things you needed to know to complete a quilt manually. I still SID manually even though I know IQ can do it for me. I'm just faster at it. A computer can really save you from a lot of tedium.

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Hi Meg,

I just want to thank you for your courage to answer these questions honestly, and from the depth of your experience. NOTHING is all good, and nothing is all bad. EVERY system has it's pros and cons. It's deciding which pros outweigh the cons that is important for each person that is trying to make a decision. I made the decision a long time ago to go with a belt driven system, and even tho' CompuQuilter doesn't have all the bells and whistles that Intelliquilter has, I KNOW the reason I chose it, and am still happy with that decision. After seeing what QuiltPath can do,( and knowing it's just the beginning), and the beautiful, virtually invisible starts and stops, I wish I had room for a 3rd machine!


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DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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Guest Linda S

Well, I give up and this will be the last thing I have to say on this post. If any of you think I was being dishonest by reporting that I've never had to adjust the wheels on my IQ and I don't have near the trouble Meg has with hers, I apologize. However, I was reporting my true experience with Intelliquilter, and I don't understand why my experience is different than hers, but I've got had a lick of trouble with accuracy. It is also my experience that I very rarely see posts from owners on teh IQ yahoo group talking about having to adjust their wheels all the time, so I'm assuming I'm not alone in getting great accuracy without a lot of effort. Perhaps Meg got hers years ago and does not have the super motors. I for one would not like a belt driven system. Yes, I looked at them before I bought, but it was not for me.

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Isn't it great that there's something for everybody?! I think back to when I got my first longarm machine in 1997; then back to when I got my first stitch-regulated machine in 2000; then back to when I got my first CompuQuilter in 2002. It's almost like going from a horse and buggy to a lear jet! We've come a long way! And I think WE can take just a bit of the credit for imagining, and wishing for, and then asking for, all the wonderful things these systems can do today. The software developers must stay awake nights trying to figure out how to accomplish all the new things we dream of and ask for. I can't even imagine what the future holds for these computerized systems, but it sure is going to be fun watching it unfold! :D

Thanks to ALL that have given valued feedback. We NEED to hear the pros and cons so we can make informed decisions. One person may have a challenge that not many others have experienced, but it's still good to know about it, so when it happens to us, we don't just think we're the only dumb one on the planet, and that it MUST be operator error. Nothing said here should be taken personally. We're talking about machines, not our children, although sometimes our machines feel like blood :o relatives, literally!

As an APQS Dealer, I've had my share of machines, usually upgrading every couple of years. In 12 years, I've had one machine that I would consider a "lemon". It just wasn't quite right. I was told to send it back, but dug my heels in and worked on that baby until it was purring. I've had CompuQuilters for 10 years, and had trouble with one of them, which turned out to be a small motor on one of the cables. VERY frustrating at the time, but now that machine does exactly what I want and expect it to do. My reasons for choosing a cable system are probably different than the reasons someone else chooses something different, and I feel extremely fortunate that I even HAD a choice, because if I didn't, I wouldn't be able to use a computerized system at all. It's the one thing that concerns me about Quilt Path. Unless they can figure a way to bring the tablet down to the front of the machine, I won't be able to use it. The pain just isn't worth the tradeoff. :wacko:


14EABCCA535C11FE692767BF2F0B87E2.png

DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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Hey Darlene, You should be able to mount the tablet to the front. Here's a picture on how I mounted my tablet for my Pantovision (before I became computerized), on my Gammill.

I ordered parts from RAM Mounts in Calgary www.gpscity.ca.

I hope my pics uploaded! :)

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 I just started blogging:   http://fiddleheadquiltz.blogspot.ca/

 

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It looks like something worth investigating Parm, but I'd need it even lower. That's why I find it so much easier to do my quilt set up with a wireless keyboard and mouse. I can have my neck and arms in a more comfortable position. Reaching up to tap, tap, tap on a tablet screen would have me reaching for something strong! LOL Wish I could ring the neck of the kid that rear ended me in 1989 and then laughed about it. He has no idea how he changed my life that night. :angry: Just one reason why I'm SO grateful for the handles on our APQS machines. I change my hand position about every 20 seconds when I'm freehanding, and am so thankful that I can. One look at the handles on many other machines makes me so grateful for the machine I have! :wub:


14EABCCA535C11FE692767BF2F0B87E2.png

DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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Sorry to hear about your accident Darlene, I sure hope you have more good days than bad. :)

Wireless keyboard and mouse, I need to add that to my set up as well. One day I will change my monitor to a 32 inch and have it mounted on the wall behind the longarm, that'd be cool. I love technology. :D

orrr..... hmmmm, I could upgrade from Win 7 to Win 8 and and a touchscreen monitor....the possibilities are endless. ;)

I love the smileys......


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 I just started blogging:   http://fiddleheadquiltz.blogspot.ca/

 

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Meg,

Just wanted to chime in... I've quilted for over 40 years and finally bought my first longarm, and APQS Millie. There is so much to learn along with so many templates available that might be helpful. I've been reading the forum daily for over a year and it has been the most valuable resource. A typical quilt show doesn't begin to show the talent I have access to from the forum. Not only is there a wealth of talent, but quilters who generously share tips to help others succeed. You are on my list of talented, generous quilters! The options and pros and cons on computerized quilting are currently overwhelming, since I have only seen one demonstrated. Thanks for your comparisons. I saved your comments as a favorite because when/if I consider that option, it will be good to think about features that I need to consider.

Thanks,


Heidi Patterson

APQS Blissed Millennium with Quilt Path

APQS Sales Rep - Educator - Authorized Service Rep

Boise, Idaho

208-861-5018 (cell)

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I just want to say that I believe all the systems have pro's and con's, and one system probably won't be right for everyone.

I made my final decision based on a commodity that I already new....customer service. I have had an APQS machine for 8 years, and I have had Quilt Path since August 5th. I love it! It does everything I want it to do, and I am getting beautiful results with it.

I won't lie, there has been a learning curve for me.... but between Bob, Jim, Mike and Nathan my answers come very quickly.

The system is wonderful as it is, and the future updates will only make it better.

Customer Service ultimately made my decision for me. I can tell you that even when I do something STUPID, like call and say that I have a tablet that will not turn on, Bob was at my house within an hour with a new tablet.... Not that I needed it (I plugged the power cord into ear jack hole on the tablet). Bob didn't make me feel stupid, and said that I was just helping him trouble shoot for future customers. There is no way to place a value to that kind of service....IMHO


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http://iowacomfort.blogspot.com/

Everyday is a good day when you get to play with fabric!

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[i can tell you that even when I do something [b]STUPID[/b], like call and say that I have a tablet that will not turn on, Bob was at my house within an hour with a new tablet.... Not that I needed it (I plugged the power cord into ear jack hole on the tablet).]

Deb, I laughed my bottom off on this one - that would be something I would have done!!!


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2009 Freedom, and a 1989 Ulti I w/Intellistitch

 

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By the way Deb, have you tried it on manual again with out the brakes on? Does it run smoother or is it still heavy?

That is going to make sense to no one but Deb, but she will know what I mean I think??!??


Lynne

Quilting in the tractor shop with Lenni and her QZ friend

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Funny Lynne! As a matter of fact I just finished a quilt that I used Quilt Path for block work, and free handed the borders on. And there was no DRAG AT ALL, once I released both brakes. I was able to go back and forth from computerized to free motion quickly and effortlessly. The borders had 3D stuff in them and I need to navigate around the charms, buttons and what nots.

Well have to have another play date just for Fonzie (for everyone but Lynne, Fonzie is what I named my Quilt Path. It seemed like a natural fit, since I had Lennie and Squiggy{Squiggy was my new table}). And of course when you order Chachie I'll plan on coming up a spending a day with you!


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http://iowacomfort.blogspot.com/

Everyday is a good day when you get to play with fabric!

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