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My step-mother gave me a set of Frixon Eraseable Gel Pens for Christmas and swears that I told her they work to mark quilts. I don't remember saying this, and thought I'd check with you all, the experts on this. It says on the instructions that the pens have thermo-sensitivegel ink formula which disappears with erasing friction. Any comments?

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I know that it also removes with the iron and the marks come back if fabric gets real cold like in the car in Wyoming winter or freezers cold then you can remove it with an iron again. I heard the marks don't come back after that. I like them for marking piecing where it wont show but I wont use it on a customer quilt.

The theory is good but not sure of them yet. I would experiment.

Shirley

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We tested these pens at our Longarm Retreat last year: the marks do appear to go away and will come back with freezer-level cold. If it's for your own quilt that will never leave your house, you're probably just fine. But if it's for a customer quilt or a quilt that may someday be shipped to a show, I would be wary, 'cause those marks may come back during shipping on a plane at altitude or a truck during winter. The marks aren't gone, so there's still chemicals on your quilt.

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You need to test the pens on your fabric. On dark colors, they leave a line even after ironing. Its a faint grayish, sort of shiny line, and depending on your ability to quilt directly on your marked lines, that may or may not be a problem. On light fabric, the line would not be noticeable. I washed my dark sample, and the faint line remained. I use the gel pens to mark embroidery, or the placement of applique shapes. I have used them to mark the sewing line on the edges of the quilt...where you are going to sew on the binding..or to mark the cutting line for a customer quilt where its been impossible to square up the corners with the quilting. A customer showed me a satin piece that she had marked guidelines on for embroindery placement. It was ruined, as the lines were glaringly visible as white lines on the white satin even after heat removal. Like everything else, they have their place. I am not concerned about the chemical interaction on my quilts. I am not making these to outlast the next ice age. But, I would not use them to mark quilting designs on a customer quilt, because there are other products that work well.

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  • 3 months later...

I am so glad I found this thread. I have heard that these pens are great, but I was afraid to try them. I think I will order a set and do some experimenting. It does not sound like a good way to mark customer quilts. What about the "Ultimate marking pencil"?  Does it stay erased, or do those lines come back sometimes, also. I have been using the purple markers and the white pen that goes on invisible, but I'm finding lines on quilts a couple years later.  I'm not sure why. I need fo find a new way of marking.

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