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Hi everybody,

I've been meaning to share this tip from a class I took a few weeks ago.

I keep forgetting.

A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

Sharon Shamber told us we shouldn't ever use the yellow oil that comes with some of our sewing machines.

I know my Bernina came with it.

She said the yellow color is caused by paraffin.

They add this to gum things up so the machine needs to be serviced more often.

Yikes.

You can use the nice clear oil from APQS or mineral oil, which I think is the same thing.

But stay away from that yellow stuff.

She also recommends dipping your thread in mineral oil to lubricate it.

She said it strengthens & extends the life of the thread and cuts down on lint.

It also keeps the machine oiled.

I tried it on a practice piece and it didn't seep from the thread to the quilt.

I'm trying to decide if I think it's worth it.

If any of you practice this, I'd love your thoughts.

Just sharing.

Happy Spring from snowy Syracuse!

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Meg,  Oiling the whole spool of thread is going to put oil in all your thread guides and your tension disc, which will then attract the dust.  The parts of the APQS machines where the threads goes do not need to be lubricated.

I took a lot of what SS said with a bit of scepticism when I had a class with her.  Maybe her machine doesn't run as well as mine.

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Does she stitch on a Nolting?  I believe she does but could be a Prodigy.  I would think any suggestions should be considered within the context of the machine you drive.  Kinda like a car.  Mine has to have the oil changed every 3,000 miles.  Hubby's says every 5,000 miles.  I do agree about using only the clear oil.  Don't want to gum things up!  Meg, thanks for sharing!!!

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Meg, I kind of agree with Lyn about some of SS's ideas. I don't know if yellow oil means there is paraffin in it as I think paraffin is white or colorless. I wonder where she heard this? Maybe it is true, I certainly have no idea. But my Nolting came with clear mineral oil and this is what I use on my machine. One thing I think I understand about mineral oil is that it too has paraffin in it.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

EDITED and not sure what I did with the rest of my first post????? Ack!!

 

Well that was a dumb statement from me. Obviously, paraffin is a byproduct of fossil fuel. And "sewing machine oil" is made from fossil fuel. Same for mineral oil. What I meant was I'm not sure that the YELLOW color comes from paraffin. Probably is just a different grade of oil to be weary of using when there are better grades to use. That's my guess. My doorbell was sounding as I was typing and I didn't go back and re-read and fix my post. 

 

I hope no one took my post as a knock on SS as I didn't mean it that way. She quilts and designs better than I could ever in my wildest dreams. Maybe one day I will see one of her quilts in person. That would be pretty dang cool. 

 

EDITED AGAIN: I remember the other part of my post that I somehow deleted. I was saying that  Dawn has posted about using WD-40 to clean out the bobbin area and then reoiling well. I'm thinking this is the "degunking" method for oil buildup that creates "gumming up."

 

Oh and SS quilts on a Prodigy (not a Nolting). Prodigy has created a model named after her.

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My Janome isn't to be oiled at all !    My Viking was the same way.   Never did oil it.   A friend of mine thought that wasn't right and oiled her Janome anyway and gummed it up.  When she took it for servicing, he said "don't do that !".   :D   Maybe some machines still need oiled though.  Depends on the brand.

 

I don't think I would like the mess of oiling a whole spool or cone of thread.   I have used the Sewer's aid or put the cone in a bag and sprayed with silicone and sealed the bag.  I rarely need to do either since I have narrowed down the threads that Millie plays nice with.   

 

Maybe just adding a drop of oil to the little dab of batting we put in the first thread guide would be OK.........just to keep the static down if there is any.   ?????

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Meg, I've seen and heard this, too; however, some time ago I took a class where we were told not to use mineral oil because over time it causes natural fibers to break down.  I've never tried it because of this warning, so I can't back that up. That always stuck in my head.  And when I used to do factory sewing we used a silicone product similar to sewer's aid. Isn't it interesting how many varying recommendations are out there? :huh:

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Hi,

 

I use the oil that came with my machines....or I replace it in kind....but...I had a bottle of oil one time and it started to get little cloudy looking strands in it...I figured that wasn't good...so I got a new bottle...and the oil had also changed color...so I do try getting a smaller size even it costs a bit more per ounce so I get fresh stuff more often.  I just follow what the machine manufacturer says to use cuz...hopefully they know what kind of oil is good for the particular machine......The kind of oil I got with my Lucey was actually the same brand as the one I had been using on my Bernina and Megaquilter....the vikings don't need oiling..but the techs do some kind of lubrications to the parts that I am not supposed to access when they are in for servicing.  Does anyone know why our grandmothers ran their quilting threads through beeswax and does that contain parrafin and did that harm those old fabrics? (not that I am going to take up handquilting with bees waxed thread)   Lin

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Bees wax is a natural product, made entirely by bees.  Its does not contain parrafin, which is a petroleum product. Hand quilters run their thread through it to keep the thread from twisting and knotting while they work.  I have used it and it works great.

 

I don't know about dumping the cone in mineral oil, but I have done that with Rainbows and silicone thread lube.  It worked wonders with the very finicky Rainbows thread.  Now that Glide has variegated and Superior has Fantastuci variegated, it won't be necesssary to even fuss with Rainbows anymore.  I've never had issues with any other thread.

 

As for Sharon Schamber, I will criticize her methods when I have won as many ribbons as she has.  For every expert in every field, there is an expert in the same field who says the first one is wrong.  What she does obviously works for her.  I don't know that the goal of the oil we used to use was to gum up the machine.  I think its all that was available for years, and may have been what older machines needed for their metal parts.  I use what my machine manufacturer recommends.

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Just judging by the different machines I have had from the same brand, my first ones were more mechanical and needed oiling on some of the parts.  My new ones are more computered and I am not to oil them ever.

 

I think it will always be different directions for different brands and different models.  Thanks for bringing this here.

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Bees wax is a natural product, made entirely by bees.  Its does not contain parrafin, which is a petroleum product. Hand quilters run their thread through it to keep the thread from twisting and knotting while they work.  I have used it and it works great.

 

I don't know about dumping the cone in mineral oil, but I have done that with Rainbows and silicone thread lube.  It worked wonders with the very finicky Rainbows thread.  Now that Glide has variegated and Superior has Fantastuci variegated, it won't be necesssary to even fuss with Rainbows anymore.  I've never had issues with any other thread.

 

As for Sharon Schamber, I will criticize her methods when I have won as many ribbons as she has.  For every expert in every field, there is an expert in the same field who says the first one is wrong.  What she does obviously works for her.  I don't know that the goal of the oil we used to use was to gum up the machine.  I think its all that was available for years, and may have been what older machines needed for their metal parts.  I use what my machine manufacturer recommends.

I completely agree with your comments, Lynn.

Well, except that I use Rainbows a lot without any silicone and never have a problem. However, I have read enough comments about thread on this forum to realize that threads act differently on different machines.

My first sewing machine was a Singer that I routinely took apart to clean and oil. My Pfaff needs machine oil in the bobbin area but is "self-oiling" and I can hear it "squirt" when I turn it on! I am warned not to oil it anywhere but the bobbin case after cleaning because too much oil attracts thread dust. I also have a Juki that I have used alot, mainly for machine quilting before Millie, and it had places where I needed to oil frequently. Millie has those little wicks that I over-oiled in the beginning, but Amy at APQS set me straight when I sent her back for a Spa treatment. My point is there are a lot of different machines with very different requirements!

With all my machines I have used the oil recommended by the manufacturer. That strategy has never failed me. I am sure though the oil today is probably a better product than 30+ years ago when I was oiling my Singer!!

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Hi,

 

RE:Millie has those little wicks that I over-oiled in the beginning, but
Amy at APQS set me straight when I sent her back for a Spa treatment.
My point is there are a lot of different machines with very different
requirements!

 

I am a newbie and just have had my Lucey now for a little bit...I am wondering if I am oiling her too much or too little....the lower wick is always fairly wet so far and I have not added any oil to that one...but the top four...I have added as they are not as wet as the lower one....I get a smaller amount of oil on my finger when I test them....so...how do I tell if they are fine or need oil...should they be completely dry before I add?  I did find a spot of oil on my practice piece after I let her sit in one place for a while.....does that mean I oiled too much?  Thanks for any tips.....Lin

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Meg I do this for my piecing thread and it does make a difference in my humble opinion!  My stitches look nicer and I have NEVER had any issues with oil spots.  Mineral Oil is not an oil like say baby oil.  It is the same thing thread lube is made of and it is much cheaper than buying that little bottle at Joanns.  You don't have to soak the thread either you can just put some beads down the spool or cone and add as you use it.  Remember anytime you have a problem with stitches on the longarm you can use the mineral oil too.  I don't usually need to but sometimes with things like metallics it can make all the difference.  I use this on my Viking and I have to say it has never sounded so good or stitched so nicely!  You don't have to soak it so that the thread is saturating the machine either.  Funny that I've heard even Bernina is recommending this on one of their newer models, can't remember which one but it solved the complaints about broken thread.

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Gals, please follow your manufacturer's instructions for oiling or not oiling machines. Computerized machines mostly have self oiling parts while mechanical machines need  oils on moving parts. Use good quality machine oil ( note: 3 in 1 oil WILL gum up your machine). If your machine has self oiling parts then never run it when it is very cold; say from being shipped. Let it warm up to room temp; the moving parts cause friction for the self lubricating parts to seep the oil. When they are really cold the oil obviously may not do its job right off the get go. Paraffin is sometimes used in oils as an adherent; I don't believe any machine manufacturer would use oils that make you service your machine more often because the more trouble free a machine is; the more they sell. Remember also that grease is for places that need grease; never put grease where it calls for oil or oil in a grease area.

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I am a newbie and just have had my Lucey now for a little bit...I am wondering if I am oiling her too much or too little....the lower wick is always fairly wet so far and I have not added any oil to that one...but the top four...I have added as they are not as wet as the lower one....I get a smaller amount of oil on my finger when I test them....so...how do I tell if they are fine or need oil...should they be completely dry before I add?  I did find a spot of oil on my practice piece after I let her sit in one place for a while.....does that mean I oiled too much?  Thanks for any tips.....Lin

 

Lin, yes it seems you are over oiling.  It should not be dripping onto your practice pieces.  the wick on the side stays wetter than the ones on top as it is gravity fed from the others.  As far as oiling the top wicks, just do it when they feel dry to the touch.   They are not dry on the inside of the head as they too are gravity fed down to the parts that need the oil.  I use my machines for several hours a day and only oil those wicks maybe once a week, or when I remember! :)

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I forgot to add that you can use the mineral oil on lots of things, not just thread to extend the live and renew it.  I use it on wicker baskets and wood as well.  

 

Of course I would not oil my machine if the manufacturer tells you not to but I'm just lubing the thread, not oiling the machine so the difference is that my machine stitches better.  

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Lin, I had oil leaking out In the LED light area and on the right handle. I was oiling when my finger didn't come off wet when rubbed over each wick.. Amy told me to wait until the wicks feel dry before adding a couple of drops. The wick on the side is always wet, I never oil that one.

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I did some calling to where I get my heavy textile repair supplies, and this is what I was told about thread lubricants in general (of which of these Sewer's Aid is is your own guess):

 

A synthetic silicone based thread lubricant has the following ingredients:  naptha solvent, petroleum mineral oil, paraffin wax, and stearate, methyl.

 

A petroleum based thread lubricant contains the following ingredients:      petroleum solvent, petroleum mineral oil, paraffin wax, and stearate, methyl.

 

Now I don't know which I should use.  I thought I was always staying away from the petroleum based products and wasn't. I also was told mineral oil blocks water, and baby oil is just scented mineral oil. :blink:

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I think the original post was directed toward oiling our machines. with an aside on dipping thread in oil.  Now I'm no expert on thread, but I would't dip mine in petroleum based oil.  You can if you like, but not me.

 

Now to the real topic.  Sewing machine oil is a petroleum based product.  A special and highly refined oil.  It's not whale oil, which by the way the navy used as recently as the '70's-maybe still do, to float nautical compasses, and its not mineral oil -I don't know what mineral oil is-"mineral" I suspect mean petroleum based.  At any rate mineral oil is not intended for machine lubrication, and sewing machine oil is not vegetable oil.  Sewing machine oil is clear and colorless.  You should buy good quality sewing machine spefically intended for sewing machines, oil like I'm sure APQS sells.  Don't use anything else.  If the oil you have is colored, it probably has something added (maybe some sewing machines like Berinia's require an additive, I don't know), or it has deterioated through oxidation.  Get rid of the colored stuff and get some new clear stuff.  If you use something other than sewing machine oil on your machine you will probably be sorry.  Jim

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From what I understand. Only use the clear sewing machine oil with our APQS machine. When it begins to turn yellow,, discard it. It has turned rancid.

The oil that I buy at the Bernina dealer is yellow when I buy it!!

I threw it out and only use the clear oil now in all my machines.

I'm hoping it makes a difference in how long I can between service visits.

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  • 6 years later...
On 3/21/2013 at 8:35 AM, Quilting Heidi said:

Meg I do this for my piecing thread and it does make a difference in my humble opinion!  My stitches look nicer and I have NEVER had any issues with oil spots.  Mineral Oil is not an oil like say baby oil.  It is the same thing thread lube is made of and it is much cheaper than buying that little bottle at Joanns.  You don't have to soak the thread either you can just put some beads down the spool or cone and add as you use it.  Remember anytime you have a problem with stitches on the longarm you can use the mineral oil too.  I don't usually need to but sometimes with things like metallics it can make all the difference.  I use this on my Viking and I have to say it has never sounded so good or stitched so nicely!  You don't have to soak it so that the thread is saturating the machine either.  Funny that I've heard even Bernina is recommending this on one of their newer models, can't remember which one but it solved the complaints about broken thread.

Oops, actually baby oil is mineral oil which is simply a petroleum oil product.

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