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Does anyone have a picture of what it should look like in the corner of a border when using beadboard? I want to do this on a quilt I am about to add to the frame. I assume I need to mark the spacing out first..do I start from the middle and work my way out, or do I just mark the spacing left to right?

 

Thanks, JC

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Both piano keys and beadboard require measured and marked spacing if you want them to fit and allow you to have nice corners. Measure the border and decide how wide you want the spaces--shooting for a start and end at the corner seams.

 

It's great if you can use the piecing for spacing as with a checkerboard or HST adjacent border and in that case you won't need to measure. But if the adjacent border is plain, measure and mark the spacing off-frame. I mark with a tick mark next to the interior seam and after the top is loaded I mark every other "return" spot in the edge (the place you'll start back towards the border seam). I use my channel lock to find the return spot--just set the channel lock with the needle over the seam mark and run across the the edge. Mark that spot under the needle on the fabric edge or on the batting. Do that for every other line and you're set.

 

You can mark full lines all along the border for extra accuracy if you like.

 

Beadboard with a quarter-inch separation requires a bit of fussing. If you are comfortable with eyeballing it, one mark will work for beadboard. You'll need to stitch a double line in the corner and start your next line about an eighth of an inch before the mark, stitch across, and then travel a hopping-foot's wdith away for the trip back. Your choice whether to travel the long SID in the border seam or off the quilt on the batting, but you'll need your mark at the place where you plan to stitch the small separation. Either at the seam or the edge as it will be the same with each pass.

Here's a photo of a piano key corner treatment--a simplest one.

Another option is to stop at the corner square and drop in a block design there as if it was a cornerstone.

Or continue the beadboard straight across to the end. Start the BB at the corner seam and make them all across. Again start at the new corner and stitch to the end. This will make a symmetrical "overlap" kinda thing that will look good and nicely planned.

post-881-0-01032700-1364143410_thumb.jpg


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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I do them the same way as Linda.  I think it gives a nice, graceful flow around the corners.  I've seen people follow the border seams as well (not mitered), and it's okay, just not as pleasing to the eye in my opinion.


Merry Jo

Merry Jo Rembold, Julian, CA

APQS Sales Representative

Millie & Quilt Path

Facebook: Creative Quilting by Merry Jo

Merryjorembold.com

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I mark a 45 degree line from the inner border out to the corner.  You have to decide on your beadboard spacing...I generally use 1 inch spacing, but you can use bigger spacing if you want.  I mark a line from the edge of the quilt to the corner of the inner border, then mark another line out to the adjoining border. In other words, I mark a square in each corner bisected by a line corner to corner.  You can mark your 1 inch lines or whatever spacing you are using.  I start at the outside of one border, quilt to the corner, turn 90 degrees and quilt out to the edge.  I then use a ruler placed along the stitched lines to get a stitching line 1/4 inch in from the first one...quilt a line to the 45 degree line I marked previously, turn and quilt out to the edge. 

 

 

I do my corners first.  Them I start at the left side of the unquilted top border and quilt  toward the center, leaving about 6 inches unquilted in the center.  I start fom the opposite side and quilt toward the center, leaving about 6 inches unquilted.  I measure to see how much space I have left unquilted, measuring from the first line (on the left  of the two lines which form the beadboard) to the first line on the left of the beadboard unit (on the section you quilted on the right side of the top border).   The measurement should be a multiple of the spacing you are using.  So, if I am using 1 inch spacing, I need to have 10, 11, 12 inches left.  If I don't, I need to either stretch the remaining sections a bit, or compress them a bit.  The minute difference in these units as opposed to the other ones will be insignificant.  What you don't want to do is make the adjustment over too few sections, or it will be noticeable. 

 

So, in my one inch spacing example, I have two lines of stitching and an empty space, the total of which is 1 inch..one line of stitching, another 1/4 from the first, and a 3/4 inch wide space before I repeat the process.

 

Clear as mud??


BDB923036A9F827EF84ACA918FB6F02D.png

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Here is a cool video from Jamie Wallen for Piano Keys but you can use his ideas for bead board, too.

 

I have used the 1/4" masking tape  so I didn't have to mark. I had swags so I was able to use those to reference and started on the quilt edge and sewed up one side of the tape and then across in the border ditch and then back down the other side of the tape. You can use a ruler or your channel locks to be more precise.  I followed my swag in the corner at a 45" angle to the quilt corner and the bead board is at the same interval as the rest of the border up to the corner.


c7bae4be5138b5e1d1f267e209f5b9f6.png

APQS Millenium in

Spring Creek, NV

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Linda, every time I read one if your posts in response to a call for help, I feel like I've been to a master class. You really are a jewel.

Claire

 

Thank you, Claire!   :wub:


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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I agree with Claire.  Thanks for sharing your expertise. 

 

And a shout out to so many others on this chat for the same.  You're all greatly appreciated.

 

I don't often get to share, if ever.  One day I'll have more opportunity.  But I do sneak some time at lunch to read and store your tips.

 

Anita

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Great timing for this post!  I've just taken in a new customer's DWR.  Non traditional couple's wedding gift, but they want a traditional quilt.  I'll be doing piano keys or cross hatching (with Linda's wonderful rulers) in the background.


Beth Durand

Elizabeth Originals Custom Quilting

www.eocquilting.com

beth@eocquilting.com

2006 APQS Millenium

Authorized APQS Dealer

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I agree with Claire and the others.  I read the posts on here to learn from many of the experienced quilters all of their tricks of the trade and appreciate their willingness to share with those of us who are less experienced and maybe less artistic so we come here and when they explain it to me or someone else I suddenly can see it much more clearly.

 

Mary

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