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francine

Bernina

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And here's another thing to ponder.

IMHO, new Berninas are not like the old ones.

If you have one that was made in Switzerland, hang on to it.

I know so many gals who have traded up, and had nothing but trouble.

Especially with the model that has the larger throat space.

I'm a Bernina lover a long time, I own 2.

Maybe they have addressed the issues they were having, but I just want you to be sure its actually a better machine.


Meg

"Do small things with great love." Mother Teresa

"Life's too short to fuss with thread." Meg Fazio

http://theonewiththreadsonherclothes.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/megfazio

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I agree with Meg...I have three "older" Berninas, all less than 10 years old. But I'm keeping them until they croak or I croak, whichever comes first! :lol:


90EB6B28C6BCFC9DAC2A6D4F9B7AFCA9.png Lisa E APQS Freedom SR with Bliss! Henderson, NV

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Hey I am one of those gals that traded up to the 830 limited edition I got about a year and half ago and though they are nice machines I have found them to be very tempermental and the biggest thing I do not like on the 830 is the bobbin function. There is no way to remove the whole case and when you trap threads in that you didn't get out it has to be taken to the shop for them to remove the case and clean it (only because it is to difficult to remove and replace the system). I have gone and watch it done and feel I am pretty handy with things but even the techncian has a hard time with it so not willing to do it either. Most everythingn else is more or less learning to tell it to do things the way it wants to do it (kind of like the computer) but I see they have changed with the newer model I think it is the 730 is the bobbin is removable. I have found the bobbin to be the main reason I would change out for the newer model but would have to work with the newer model a littl more to be sure that is the only issue for me. Hope this gives some informationto help on the purchase of a new machine and this is only my view. Would like to hear more if they are out there. Have had Bernina for 30 years and still like them.


Bonnie Devenport

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None of the new machines are made like the older machines; just like in anything else. Corporations are always trying to do it cheaper and there are companies who are switching to foreign labor and parts to do just that. I don't care for the look of any of the new machines; too much plastic. My 2 Vikings were top of the line in the 90's and have the aluminum one piece housing that I won't sacrifice! Not sure what I'll do when they die; I'll cross that bridge when I get there.


c7bae4be5138b5e1d1f267e209f5b9f6.png

APQS Millenium in

Spring Creek, NV

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I also sew on old machines. I think the key is to decide what you really want to do with a machine. I have never known anyone who uses all of the decorative stitches and bells and whistles on the new super expensive machines. What I need is a great straight stitch, sometimes zig zag and maybe a blanket stitch. For garment sewing blind hemstitched, hemmed and button holes. That's about it. I sew on an old treadle, a singer featherweight, an Elna 62, and older bernina's (830, 930, and 1130). I should probably thin the herd. The old bernina 930 is my go to machine.


Claire in NC

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I had a Bernina 440 and upgraded to a 630 for the embroidery flash drive feature as opposed to hooking it to a computer for embroidery. I'm wondering how I can tell if mine is made in Switzerland? I purchased it about 3 (?) years ago.

 

EDIT: Never mind, I see mine says "made in Switzerland" on it. I love this machine. The 440 was awesome, too.

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Hi,

 

I had a 440, one of the first ones out...never did bond with it...traded it in for a 630 soon after that one came out because I wanted BSR.  I really do like my 630 and use it for most of my piecing...neither one of these are in production anymore.  It is very easy to change stitch length and width which I like and you can do so in smaller increments then on my Vikings.....I do like the bells and whistles on it such as needle down, the knee lift, and the safety setting for when I have my single hole plate on......Lin

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I agree with Meg also. The older Berninas are a great machine. When I initially bought my 440, I thought it was the Swiss made version. I was devastated to discover it was the Asian assembled one. Needless to say, despite it being Bernina tagged, I wanted the one that said 'made in Switzerland'. I searched and only recently purchased, (second hand) the Swiss made version. From day one it has run noticeably better (even as a second hand model) than my brand new 440 (non Swiss made) ever has.

If you are upgrading, try and get one from their Swiss factory. I don't think you'll go wrong then. :)


5D9B899E078457BB53D3F7C6030FEE84.pngJulie & "The Pearl Girl"

Hand guided 2012 Blissed Millennium with Glide.

http://heritage-keepsakes.blogspot.com.au

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I still  have my first Bernina - a mechanical 830 (I think) Record.  Weighs a ton.  No plastic.  Absolutely the best straight stitch I've ever seen.  It has about 8 stitches - really all you need, blind hem, zigzag, etc.  Doesn't have needle up/down, doesn't have foot tap for single stitch, but it is still a great machine.  I'm thinking it is about 40 years old.  My newer Bernina is a 170  - I think about 20 years old.  I also love it.  Wouldn't trade up for the newer models - I've tried them, and don't think the stitch formation is as good, and based on reports, they are fussy.  As far as I could tell, the BSR doesn't really work very well.

 

If you are happy with your 440, keep it.


Bonnie

(and Amazing Grace)

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I have a 12 year old Bernina and I love the way it sews. But when I first used it, the trouble I had was with the hook. The one that came on the machine was plastic! It actually broke. BUT I replaced it with their metal hook and haven't had a problem since.

The salesperson told me that to keep their prices down they started putting in the plastic hook and then when it breaks you paid $100 to get the metal one. I don't know if they still do this but it would be a good thing to check if you were buying one today.


Anne

Freedom/Quilt Glide/SR/Lift/Power Advance

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I have a 19 year old Bernina 1630 that I will never get rid off. This my go to machine. I love it. 5 years ago I purchased a 730 for the embroidery component. I rarely piece on this machine just embroider. I have no idea if it is Swiss made I will have to check.


Julie

Pines and Needles Quilting

2010 Millennium "Lilly"

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Hi,

 

Both the Bernina 440 and 630 are the 5.5 mm machines....I really think I get a better straight stitch with them then I do on my 9 mm Viking....I did get a Bernina because of the BSR and the way I think of the BSR is rather like training wheels...if you already can FMQ, there is no point in getting it and it is not as smooth as a human who knows have to FMQ....but for use newbies...it is another learning aid....on the Bernina site, many folks used the BSR and found that they could graduate to not using it after a bit of practice....I never got to that point probably because I was still working and did not put in the hours on my machine to do so....so the BSR really has been helpful in finishing up those table toppers where I just did not want to do plan old stitch in the ditch...The other advantage my 630 had over the 440 was the that the foot pedal was very responsive to changes in foot pressure and the foot tap to change the needle position is really great....too bad they stopped making the 630....I never have sewn on an older Bernina so really can not compare to those...I have my grandmothers treadle...but I don't have it working, that probably has a really good staight stitch...but I never as a child could get it stitching forward....seems I remember only being able to get the thing stitching backwards...can they do that?  I know grandma used to give the flywheel a pull to get her going......Lin

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I know this is about Berninas but I got a Pfaff about 12 years ago and still love it!!!  Wouldn't trade it for anything!  However, my DH did get me a Singer Featherweight for my birthday last fall and I love sewing on that too!  So....I think it is true, older machines do sew well!!!  They were made to be workhorses!


aedc2cc10e0045c5397509e8f6b74d4d.png

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sewmanyquiltssewlittletime/

Proud Millie Owner!

Sew Many Quilts - Sew Little Time

Custom Long Arm Quilting

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Wow THANKS!

I have a 440 QE and like it but lots of little issues. The service has been pitiful. When the screw casings in the cover turned out to be broken they glued it back together. How something like this could be broken i don't know.

I am going to check to see if it is swissmade when i get home.

I was looking at the 780 but i think after reading your inputs i will wait. It was a little too much anyway. For that price i could sell my 2009 Millie and upgrade :) hmmmmmm!

I really appreciate you gals.

Have a blessed Easter


B.O.T.H.

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Francine...it really depends on what you want to do with your dsm, doesn't it?   I simply adore my Bernina 1530 which they stopped making in 1997.  It is a solid, heavy, Swiss made machine.  It does everything I need from a sewing machine.   You can find them on ebay periodically for under $800.  I have purchased two from ebay and both work beautifully.  The machine meets my needs:  I don't make clothing anymore but I do a lot of piecing and machine applique (with zig zag, satin stitch and blanket stitch).  I sold my newer, more expensive Bernina (200), a model which many people love.  For me, it was intimidating, too computerized, I didn't like all the sound effects and I wasn't using half of what it was capable of doing.  I also learned that the machines which are capable of doing a wider embroidery stitch have the feed dogs set farther apart.  This makes them not as good for piecing.

 

IMHO, the machines that try to do everything wind up not doing anything well.  The big, expensive Bernina 830 claims to do everything but cook your dinner.  In reality is notorious for being temperamental.  Why don't you consider buying a used dsm?  It's an option.      Nancy in Tucson

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Bernina actually owns a factory is Thailand that manufactures some parts for Bernina.  ALL machines are assembled and tested in Switzerland except the Bernettes.  The Bernettes are made by Juki for Bernina and say "made for Bernina" right on the machines.  I am sorry if some of you have had a bad experience with a Bernina dealer/tech who didn't take good care of you or your machine.  Bernina strives for customer service   I worked for several years for the top Benina dealer in our 5 state area and took many hours of training directly from Bernina, some at the Chicago headquarters.  The owner of the shop was awarded a trip to the factory in Switzerland and saw first hand how dedicated the employees are.  I know that there have been some issues with the new 8 series machines...but the more "high tech" our machines get the fussier they get.  (Kind of like our automobiles--the more computerized they get, the more complex they are, with more to go wrong, and more expensive to fix.)  I have previously owned a Bernina 145 and a 440 but currently own a 730 and 430.  I wouldn't part with either one.  (one at my quilting studio and one at home).  I am sure that the 730 will become outdated in the near future for embroidery as the computer technology continues to grow and become better but for now it is exactly what I need.  The sewing part should last a good long time!!

 

That is part of what I love about my APQS machine.  It is simple and commercially built.  Not too high tech.

 

There are some fantastic old Viking, Pfaff, Janome, Elna etc machines out there too that are true workhorses.   I own one of those too (Ricar-- which is nearly 30 yrs old) and my mother still sews on a Viking that is nearly 50 yrs old.  The Singer Featherweights are an amazing machine that run like the Eveready Bunny...(I have a couple of those, too)

 

I just spoke to the shop owner to make sure that what I am writing is accurate.  She warns you to be careful of purchasing a machine in another country...it voids the warranty!!  I remember a couple bringing in a machine for warrantee work that they purchased in Canada, online.  They needed to return it to a Canadian dealer for warrantee work.

 

If you purchase a used Bernina from a certified dealer, the remaining warrantee can be transferred to the new owner.  Only a certified Bernina dealer can do this.

 

OK...I will get off my soap box...


Lucy Drinkall

o2b Quilting, LLC
APQS sales/rental and custom quilting

1025 Industrial Drive, Suite A
Spring Valley, MN 55975
www.o2bquilting.com
lucy@acegroup.cc

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Thanks Lucy I appreciate your input! I thought they quit making the 730 It really would my my choice. I was seriously considering having  my brother or my friend pick me up a machine in Europe That would have been a disaster!!

I dont think your on a soapbox, i take it as a fellow quilter speaking out to me, before i screw up :P


B.O.T.H.

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I bought a 730 just over a year ago.  I decided that I would buy that model as it had been around a while and I had only heard good things about it unlike some of the newer machines.  I have had nothing but trouble with it.  It has made many visits to dealer and he has tried to fix it but without much success.  It is noisy, it constantly breaks the thread and the stitch quality is nothing like it is with my Bernina 170 which is an older machine. I have only used it so far to do straight stitches,  I haven't used any of the decorative one.  I thankfully didn't buy the embroidery unit, I can't imagine what that would be like.  I am very disappointed with the 730.  My dealer is confused as he has never had a problem with this machine before.  

 

I am sorry to sound negative but just wanted to alert you to possible problems.  If you are serious about buying a 730 make sure that you take a very long test drive before you commit.  Mine will be OK for a while and then will begin to do odd things.  It is rather like taking a car into be fixed, it behaves when it is at the dealer and it is difficult to recreate the problems that I have had.  I always go in with a long list of what setting, needle, thread, etc I am using and what the machine has done.  I have even spent time sewing in the dealers until it goes wacky so they can see what I am talking about!

 

Good luck with your search and be sure to do your homework thoroughly before you buy.


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Have an old Singer with slant needle.  Does zig-zag and has many cams with it.  Has never had a repair and it was used regularly for 45 years.  It is now  about 60 years old and used occasionally.     

 

My next purchase was a Bernina 1630 and it too has been a wonderful machine.   Bought another 1630 a couple of years ago on e-bay and  it was in great shape (like new) and had many extra feet and two extra programs.  Bought the first Bernina because of the many features it has and used them all for a few years; then I discovered piecing quilts.  I do not use all of those features anymore, but it has been a wonderful machine.     Right now a niece has been using my second Bernina as she has become interested in quilting.  She made one baby quilt and is now making a bed size quilt for her own use. 

 

If I had more room, I probably would have more mchines.  (Good thing, space has become a problem.)

 

Marilyn

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I have both a 730E and the new 830. When the 830 came out, I was so sure I would never love it like the 730, I kept it. Gladly I was wrong, my poor 730 sits lonely waiting for me to take her to a class. That was the other reason I kept her. When they first came out, I bought the 830 and had problems with her. New machine, new technology. My dealer was great, after trying to fix it and sending it back to Chicago, they ordered me a brand new 830. This one is great and the bells and whistles are what makes me use it over the 730 now. It is the same workhorse of a machine as my 730 but better. I use it on an average of probably 4 days a week, when I'm not using my Millie ;-) One thing to keep in mind when buying, the dealer you decide on is just as important as the machine. You need a dealer that has great teachers for the mastery classes you need to take to learn about the machine. The dealer's tech is another important part of the equation. Make sure they have a good one and can work on your machine. I absolutely love my dealer, they go out of their way to make sure I'm a satisfied customer. 

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