Sheagatzi

basting top/bottom/sides - remove after?

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I'm still trying to master basting the sides of my top down.   Pinning, large basting stitches, smaller ones....fast speed, slow speed.   I'm thinking this is something that gets better as time goes on, but I really have a hard time evenly stitching down the sides or top or bottom without a pucker or a wobble.   I've put my channel locks on and that completely is horrid.   I'm trying to keep the edges even and squared, but still have a bit of 'give' of a few millimeters once in a while, because of the fabric shift when the hopper foot glides along the fabric.  

 

Does any of this make sense?  any tips or tricks to help me along?   

Also,  do you remove the baste stitching when you have completed quilting the quilt?   


Andrea  http://www.urbanquiltworks.com

Motha Stitcha on an apqs millennium

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I don't use the stitch regulator and just go fairly quickly which makes stitches about 1/4" long.   I baste about 1/4" from the edge, so that basting is hidden inside the binding when I am done.   Do you use a straight ruler to hold down the edge as you go along?   I find that helps keep it flat and not pushing ahead of the hopping foot..


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APQS Millenium and Quiltazoid

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I generally have the regulator on....doesn't mater though. When going across the top of the quilt, first I pin about a half inch down from the top. You don't need a lot of pins. Then while stitching about an eighth inch from the top edge, use your left hand to push down on the quilt behind where you just stitched. Keeping pressure on the quilt really helps.

When stitching down the sides, I do kind of a zigzag on and off the quilt, often with my left hand working with the often wavy border edges. I don't get puckers that way.

Also, I don't remove basting. It gets cut out or hidden under the binding anyway.

Hope this is helpful.

Jess


Jessica Noonan

Butterfly Quilting Studio

http://www.jessicaquilts.blogspot.com

APQS Freedom SR

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Linda, thanks for the ruler idea, I will try this out tonight.  :-)  

Jess -  the closer I stitch to the edge, the harder it gets for me.    I will try the technique you suggested, as right now, I use my left hand to push down ahead of the stitching.  

 

 

So, the basting doesn't have to look perfect?  it's more the function of keeping edges flat, etc?


Andrea  http://www.urbanquiltworks.com

Motha Stitcha on an apqs millennium

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I pin baste the sides of the quilt top using flower head pins vertically along the edge of the quilt.   I remove the pins if I stitch to the edge with the design and baste down the sides after I have quilted the entire section, before advancing to the next section.  Sometimes I pin baste large areas of the quilt and roll back and forth to use a specific thread or design, leaving the sides pinned until all quilting is completed in the area of the machine.  I hope that makes sense.

 

I think that these are the Clover flower head pins that Dawn recommends:

 

http://www.clover-usa.com/product/69402/2505/_/Flower_Head_Pins_(Card)

 

These are the pins that I have been using:

 

http://clover-usa.com/product/69402/2506/_/Flower_Head_Pins_(Boxed)


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Carmen in the Ozarks
 

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You'll be surprised how fast and accurately you can zip across the quilt with your hand behind the stitching. And yep, your basting stitches can look like crapola! My customers have never complained....to my face anyway....heehee.


Jessica Noonan

Butterfly Quilting Studio

http://www.jessicaquilts.blogspot.com

APQS Freedom SR

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I feel like the odd girl out. I never baste the top, sides, or bottom of the quilt. If something needs to be straightened or adjusted, I use pins exclusively. I don't baste the top edge, but use my channel lock to determine if the first horizontal seam is straight and then pin both that seam and the top edge.

I have been shown in a class to ease in fullness on an edge by stitching on the edge and then off onto the batting and back onto the top--like a scallop or zig-zag--so the fullness can be taken up between the stitches. But I can get the same result with pins. Just the way I do it... ^_^


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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I'm wondering if your hopping foot is too low.. that will drag fabric.. 

We had to adjust mine when I used a puffy batting.

 

I use machine basting on the top of the quilt only, but I use the

up/down button and only baste about every inch.  works quite well.

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Linda's method of pin basting the first seam with the channel lock on before basting has helped a lot. And no, I do not worry about how it looks, just try to keep it within the seam allowance for the binding.

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Most generally, I do EXACTLY with Linda R does. Hardly EVER baste the quilt. If it's wonky...I may do single up/down stitches with longer stitches at my choice to help hold everything in it's place. It's easier that way to remove, if i'm needing/wanting to.


F55CA928B31BF9D50E35FB71F402EFB1.png Millennium/IntelliQuilter 402-450-8321 Designer of the 1/2" foot for Ult II's. 1sheributler@gmail.com

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This is really a God send type post! I have nothing but trouble using the machine to baste the sides down. I believe my hopping foot may be a little too low as I struggle with the fabric pushing ahead and to the side of my hopping foot when I try to baste something down. I just had to pick out a lot of stitching because I didn't realize how badly off kilter my quilt was getting. I'd love to try the pin/channel lock way (I have a machine with no electronic channel locks, but the Handi Quilter ones for the wheels work fine), but I'm having a hard time picturing how you use the channel lock to check the first seam. Is there somewhere where I can see this done or demonstrated that you know of online? Thanks.

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Easiest way to describe it is - line up the front portion of the foot with the first seam line inside the border,  clamp your machine on its carriage so it cannot move forward or back , then move along the table pinning the top edge of the quilt after you have adjusted the seam to be level with the front of the foot..


Lyn Crump   Hand Guided 2013 Millenium Blissed and Gliding    APQS Sales Rep SE Qld Australia   www.busyquilting.com.au   On Facebook and Instagram as BusyQuilting


Attitude is everything - So pick a good one!

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I always baste and I'm certainly ne expert, Im chiming in here because I have a different method. I use the fingernail on my left thumb to pull the fabric just a little bit. If I'm basting across the top I have my thumb to the left of the foot and as the foot pushes the fabric slightly to the right I grab little bits with my thumbnail and pull back the other way. If I'm basting down the side I keep my thumb behind the foot and pull backwards as the foot tries to push the fabric forward.

It works really well and if the border has excess fullness you can distribute it quite evenly with no puckers.


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2009 Millennium...loving the M&M wheels.

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It has been a long time since I have been on this site! but here is another way to baste:

 

Use the channel lock to make a straight horizontal line to line up the top and lay the top along the line. Then with a speed of around 9 (I sometimes use the stitch regulator) I stitch just outside the top and every couple of inches or so I stitch just at the edge of the top like a tiny "v" to tack it down. I started doing this when there was a lot of fullness and just stitching a straight line made pleats or didn't let me distribute the fullness easily. Now I just do it all the time. It really helps to take out the basting if I find I ever need to reposition anything before i get into the quilting. I just use a seam ripper to take out the 2-3 stitches for each "tack down". I baste the side edges like this too.

 

Again, just another idea for you!

 

Carol (Ferrari, aka Quilt Happy)


Carol

Always happy when quilting!

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I also struggle with this process, thanks for all the input and sharing of ideas. I am struggling with basting down the quilt top -how to deal with the fullness as you roll the quilt to baste the sides down. I am experimenting using loftier poly batting and as soon as I make one full turn on the roll up bar the quilt starts to wrinkle and pucker in the center. Then I am worried about basting any further on the sides. I am working on basting the quilt down so I can then go back and secure the "bones" of the quilt on all the pieced squares as I have seen on tutorials. With the loftier batting I also am seeing my foot push the fabric. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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Hi Andrea - I always stitch across the top and down the sides as I go.  It makes me feel like the quilt is more secure.  Once I get down to the bottom, tho, I pin until the very last pass, and then I put a line of stitching.  I try to keep 1/8 to 1/4 inch and use fairly big stitches (9 and nsr). 

 

I find that "walking" your index and middle fingers behind the hopping foot as you move left to right really helps.  When I move vertically, I use my left hand either in front of or behind the hopping foot to give a bit of pressure.

 

That what works for me -

 

Bev


Bev 2012 Blissed Freedom aka "Freeda"

 www.littlehousecreations.blogspot.com

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I always baste and I'm certainly ne expert, Im chiming in here because I have a different method. I use the fingernail on my left thumb to pull the fabric just a little bit. If I'm basting across the top I have my thumb to the left of the foot and as the foot pushes the fabric slightly to the right I grab little bits with my thumbnail and pull back the other way. If I'm basting down the side I keep my thumb behind the foot and pull backwards as the foot tries to push the fabric forward.

It works really well and if the border has excess fullness you can distribute it quite evenly with no puckers.

 

 

First, my quilt sandwich is very loose and the top edge rolled to right in front of me - I also, use my left hand fingers to help ease the quilt top as I slowly baste 1/2" long stitches on the top (first I stitch a guide line with the channel lock across the top through the batting and backing only).  When basting the top, I start in the middle (where everything is lined up) and baste to the right, then back in the middle and baste to the left.

And I either pin the sides or use the "walking fingers" behind the foot as Cindy says!  And, as others said, sometimes the fabric builds up a bit so I stitch off and back on the edge.


Cathy

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