What do you do with wavy borders?


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HI Hitomi,  I'm sure someone with more experience will chime in here with an answer for you.  What I did was steam it by holding my iron over the fabric until it shrank up a little. The quilt was still on the frame and I didn't want to press on the fabric on top of the batting in case the steam affected the batting. I've seen posts where someone said to put your ironing board under your frame and iron the quilt that way, but I couldn't make my ironing board work with the frame.  I hope this helps.  I also pushed and manipulated the border while easing in the fullness afterwards, as Heidi mentioned.

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That's exactly what I would do, is starch it a little and ease it in!  :)  I like striping/piano keys for full borders like this...or wide open feathers!  Something that gives me some room to play and get that extra fabric in without distorting the quilt or causing folds or puckers.  I have yet to have to be forced to pleat a quilt *knocks on wood*.

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...I also just about always turn my quilts to quilt the side borders...it's a pain and extra work but you can get that whole border done in one swoop and I find that I flow so much better so that it looks worlds better...it also makes playing around with that border and pinning if you need too SO much easier!  :)  I even turn sometimes just to do the sashings that run from top to bottom if I'm going to do one long continuous line of quilting.

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The only video I can find now on this subject is simply called "wavy border."   As a newbie, I am wondering how this happens. Does the fabric stretch during handling that much? Was the cutting off a little? How does this much wave come about?

 

Hi there!  Quilt tops "grow" as more rows and borders are added if you're not careful with measurements and piecing.  Most of the time, the piecer puts borders on based on the outside measurements of the edges and that makes the borders too long (and it causes the quilt to grow more).  Try to educate your customers about how to put a border on correctly by cutting the border lengths according to the measurement through the center (and sometimes they may have to measure a few places through the quilt and then sort of average those measurements).  Sometimes it's best to remove and replace these growing borders or you'll have to starch, steam, pin, and tuck or pleat to tame the fabric in to keep the quilt square?!

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If steam and starching doesn't do the trick, and if your customer is willing to pay extra for you to fuss with it, I've "fixed" multiple border fullness by frogging a section of the most-offensive seam. Make a pleat within the full section, preferably where it shows least and it's easiest to match the pattern of the fabric. Make sure the inner border edge is turned under and slip the now-fixed edge of the other border underneath and lined up. Use a basting stitch to join the seam and tack down the pleat. Quilt the borders. Your customer can use a hand-applique stitch to join the seam and nail down the pleat before she removes the basting stitches.

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