Recommended Posts

Quilters are underpaid.  Holy Moly! All the quilts that I paid to have quilted were worth every penny, and more.  I thought they were expensive but now I see things from the other perspective.  Funny how things change. 

If not for this forum and youtube, I'd be more lost than I am. 

Joan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have trouble charging what I should because I know I wouldn't want to pay it, but it is worth more than we charge. When I get busier, then I guess I will start adjusting prices. Still building my client base, and with the economy, well you know how it is.

Shirley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joan, I don't quilt for the public, so I can't speak from experience, but I suspect an "Amen, Sister!" is appropriate here! You're so right about how our perspective changes with circumstances. I'm just thankful that I can enjoy my hobby and the wonderful advice of the folks on this forum, without the added pressure of customers. Maybe one day!


1F9DFE34D41A6016711E24CB5113250C.png

2008 Millennium

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have pretty much stopped quilting for others.   I think a few people will discover that what I charged was VERY reasonable and they probably won't find that again.   I got tired of spending so much time with customers who didn't figure my time was worth anything.    ;) I enjoy quilting for myself, my quilt group and a couple gals in there who KNOW what machine quilting is worth and how much work goes into some of it.   


D7F6E8B831DDA5A10DA95B7BBCD5C9C7.png

APQS Millenium and Quiltazoid

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Helpful hint---NEVER figure out your hourly wage when you're first starting out with a business. :blink:  That way lies madness!

Try to look at it like your first learning years are an apprenticeship.

An apprentice in the manly trades works to learn and is paid less than a journeyman.

As a longarmer, you're paid less because while you may be charging industry-standard fees, it takes you longer to do all the tasks involved, from loading to deciding on designs, occasional frogging, grooming, second-guessing, etc. As you get more competent and confident, your tasks take less time and your hourly rate goes up.

 

The problem area is that stretch between when your talents are up-graded and still you're afraid to charge a logical cents-per-inch for your quilting. When you reach that point it's time to charge what you're worth, especially for custom.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Linda gives excellent advice, as always.

 

Longarm machine quilting is a lot hard work! There is no glamour in this job! :rolleyes:  :D


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my questions....how much is the average quilter charging per square inch for all overs, I charge 3.50/ square foot.   does anyone else charge a set-up fee? (I do) and how do you go about the customs?? According to my own price lists and the amount of hours I put into the custom quilts I do I never charge what the custom should be as I'm afraid to charge someone that much money.  What do you charge someone for something that takes you 30 hours to do??? I spend an inordinate amount of time on these things and then charge 5.00/square foot max because I'm afraid of losing the client, and I've been at this since 08.  Thoughts???


Tracey Russell, Whirls n Swirls Quilting-APQS Ontario Oshawa, Ontario.

Dealer Support and Educator APQS Canada

905-435-8720

https://www.facebook.com/whirlsnswirls/

http://www.whirlsnswirlsquilting.ca

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU5KPwWA2TaeO9xulOa5PKg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, all-overs generally are .02 to .03 psi. A custom quilt that takes 30 hours would come to about $750, I'm guessing, plus thread and batting. My custom range is .04 to .10 psi. They most commonly fall into the .06 range though. I used to be afraid of charging too much. I got over that though. I wanted to be paid properly for my work and as I started charging properly it got easier to say...."That will be $500 please." Oh and I do charge a setup fee now. It's only $5 per every 15 minutes.

Jess


Jessica Noonan

Butterfly Quilting Studio

http://www.jessicaquilts.blogspot.com

APQS Freedom SR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps consider charging custom by the hour, not by the square inch?


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a newbie, I have no idea what I would charge and will not be quilting for the public. But as a long time machine embroiderer, it seems like people would just expect me to do it for free or trade. Nobody wanted to put out any cold hard cash. They just thought it was so easy and quick and the machine did all the work. No matter the years of skill I had developed. It got kind of frustrating and I just stopped doing it. Now I embroider for myself, grandkids, family, charity.


Peggy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...